Corona

19 Dec 18
halfwheel

Warped’s Kyle Gellis has been making inroads into the wine industry with his Blue Monster wine brand; now Warped itself has created a cigar for a winery. The winery is Nine Suns, a 23-acre vineyard in Napa Valley. The cigar is called Sun Archer. Gellis posted a picture of the cigar on his Instagram Stories. […]

19 Dec 18
Press Telegram
Scott Meyer, left, shown during a game in 2015, has resigned as the football coach at Servite. He was the team’s coach for three seasons. (File photo: Michael Goulding, Orange County Register/SCNG) After a six-week search, Lakewood has its new football coach. The Lancers have hired former Jordan head coach Scott Meyer to lead their football program, with him set to meet his new team for the first time Wednesday afternoon. For Meyer, it’s a homecoming to the place where he had his first job as a high school position coach. “Just very excited, very happy,” Meyer said. “My family is really excited that I’m going to be back and close to home in Long Beach. Just very thankful for this opportunity. I think there’s a ton of potential in Lakewood. Unfortunately, they’ve gone through quite a few coaches since Thad McNeal left, but I think it’s a good area to attract kids, new stadium going in in a couple years, all of that. So a lot of positives.” Meyer returns to Long Beach Unified School District, and the Moore League, after spending the past season at University High School and before that four years at Corona del Mar, where he won three section championships and one state title with the Sea Kings, and three seasons at Servite (2015-17). He first made his name at Jordan, though, spending six years in charge of the Panthers and making the playoffs in 2008. “I’m trying to get Lakewood back where they were when I left the Moore League close to 10 years ago,” Meyer said. Meyer’s experience in Long Beach and the Moore League was a big factor for Lakewood in making the hire. “I’m fired up,” athletic director Mike Wadley said. “Scott checked off a lot of our boxes. Having been in the Moore League, having success with Jordan and then leaving and going to Corona del Mar and having success there, has ideas of connecting with our Pop Warner programs. And he’s a Long Beach guy. He knows the area, he knows the kids. He knows the lay of the land and that’s so important to us that we had that.” Meyer inherits a Lakewood program that went 3-7 last season with a tough nonleague schedule and a 3-3 mark in the Moore League. Former head coach Michael Christensen resigned from Lakewood in November following three years in his second tenure with the program. “Coach Christensen has built it, the foundation is there; now we need someone to put a house on it,” Wadley said. “We were the Lakers, we needed a LeBron. And we got a LeBron.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]The work starts on Wednesday with his first team meeting with the Lancers, where Meyer expects to set the plan for this spring, when he’ll start preparing the team and working as a teacher at Lakewood, as well. “Lifting, speed workouts, getting to know each of the young men on the team, have a parent meeting, getting to know everybody at Lakewood,” Meyer listed. “Ton of work to do, but just really getting the guys in the program excited.”
19 Dec 18
SCNG
Scott Meyer, left, shown during a game in 2015, has resigned as the football coach at Servite. He was the team’s coach for three seasons. (File photo: Michael Goulding, Orange County Register/SCNG) After a six-week search, Lakewood has its new football coach. The Lancers have hired former Jordan head coach Scott Meyer to lead their football program, with him set to meet his new team for the first time Wednesday afternoon. For Meyer, it’s a homecoming to the place where he had his first job as a high school position coach. “Just very excited, very happy,” Meyer said. “My family is really excited that I’m going to be back and close to home in Long Beach. Just very thankful for this opportunity. I think there’s a ton of potential in Lakewood. Unfortunately, they’ve gone through quite a few coaches since Thad McNeal left, but I think it’s a good area to attract kids, new stadium going in in a couple years, all of that. So a lot of positives.” Meyer returns to Long Beach Unified School District, and the Moore League, after spending the past season at University High School and before that four years at Corona del Mar, where he won three section championships and one state title with the Sea Kings, and three seasons at Servite (2015-17). He first made his name at Jordan, though, spending six years in charge of the Panthers and making the playoffs in 2008. “I’m trying to get Lakewood back where they were when I left the Moore League close to 10 years ago,” Meyer said. Meyer’s experience in Long Beach and the Moore League was a big factor for Lakewood in making the hire. “I’m fired up,” athletic director Mike Wadley said. “Scott checked off a lot of our boxes. Having been in the Moore League, having success with Jordan and then leaving and going to Corona del Mar and having success there, has ideas of connecting with our Pop Warner programs. And he’s a Long Beach guy. He knows the area, he knows the kids. He knows the lay of the land and that’s so important to us that we had that.” Meyer inherits a Lakewood program that went 3-7 last season with a tough nonleague schedule and a 3-3 mark in the Moore League. Former head coach Michael Christensen resigned from Lakewood in November following three years in his second tenure with the program. “Coach Christensen has built it, the foundation is there; now we need someone to put a house on it,” Wadley said. “We were the Lakers, we needed a LeBron. And we got a LeBron.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]The work starts on Wednesday with his first team meeting with the Lancers, where Meyer expects to set the plan for this spring, when he’ll start preparing the team and working as a teacher at Lakewood, as well. “Lifting, speed workouts, getting to know each of the young men on the team, have a parent meeting, getting to know everybody at Lakewood,” Meyer listed. “Ton of work to do, but just really getting the guys in the program excited.”
19 Dec 18
Orange County Register
Scott Meyer, left, shown during a game in 2015, has resigned as the football coach at Servite. He was the team’s coach for three seasons. (File photo: Michael Goulding, Orange County Register/SCNG) After a six-week search, Lakewood has its new football coach. The Lancers have hired former Jordan head coach Scott Meyer to lead their football program, with him set to meet his new team for the first time Wednesday afternoon. For Meyer, it’s a homecoming to the place where he had his first job as a high school position coach. “Just very excited, very happy,” Meyer said. “My family is really excited that I’m going to be back and close to home in Long Beach. Just very thankful for this opportunity. I think there’s a ton of potential in Lakewood. Unfortunately, they’ve gone through quite a few coaches since Thad McNeal left, but I think it’s a good area to attract kids, new stadium going in in a couple years, all of that. So a lot of positives.” Meyer returns to Long Beach Unified School District, and the Moore League, after spending the past season at University High School and before that four years at Corona del Mar, where he won three section championships and one state title with the Sea Kings, and three seasons at Servite (2015-17). He first made his name at Jordan, though, spending six years in charge of the Panthers and making the playoffs in 2008. “I’m trying to get Lakewood back where they were when I left the Moore League close to 10 years ago,” Meyer said. Meyer’s experience in Long Beach and the Moore League was a big factor for Lakewood in making the hire. “I’m fired up,” athletic director Mike Wadley said. “Scott checked off a lot of our boxes. Having been in the Moore League, having success with Jordan and then leaving and going to Corona del Mar and having success there, has ideas of connecting with our Pop Warner programs. And he’s a Long Beach guy. He knows the area, he knows the kids. He knows the lay of the land and that’s so important to us that we had that.” Meyer inherits a Lakewood program that went 3-7 last season with a tough nonleague schedule and a 3-3 mark in the Moore League. Former head coach Michael Christensen resigned from Lakewood in November following three years in his second tenure with the program. “Coach Christensen has built it, the foundation is there; now we need someone to put a house on it,” Wadley said. “We were the Lakers, we needed a LeBron. And we got a LeBron.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]The work starts on Wednesday with his first team meeting with the Lancers, where Meyer expects to set the plan for this spring, when he’ll start preparing the team and working as a teacher at Lakewood, as well. “Lifting, speed workouts, getting to know each of the young men on the team, have a parent meeting, getting to know everybody at Lakewood,” Meyer listed. “Ton of work to do, but just really getting the guys in the program excited.”
19 Dec 18
Tech, Great Beer, and Sweat!

In a world driven by technology and transcending into a milestone of revolution, millennials are fast becoming the principal instruments of this change—bringing in a more developed society. Regardless of the label of the most entitled generation in history, they are pushing through the bars of politics, social platforms, and businesses. They are active and […]

18 Dec 18
SCNG
#gallery-1491056-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1491056-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1491056-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1491056-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Coach of the Year Randy Post, of Foothill, snaps a selfie with The Register’s All-County girls volleyball team at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Natalie Berty is the 2018 SCNG SoCal Varsity girls volleyball Player of the Year. Photographed at the Meruelo Athletic Center in Santa Ana on Tuesday, December 4, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Foothill’s Randy Post is The Register’s All-County girls volleyball Coach of Year. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) The Register’s All-County girls volleyball team includes San Clemente’s Kirra Schulz, Trabuco Hills’ Kelly Negron, Mater Dei’s Mandalay Rennon, front row from left, Foothill’s Grace Cannon, Los Alamitos’ Abby Karich, San Juan Hills’ Abby Dayton, Mater Dei’s Mia Tuaniga, second row from left, and Coach of the Year Foothill’s Randy Post photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Corona del Mar’s Kendall Kipp in Newport Beach on Monday, Sep. 10, 2018 is considered one of the top volley ball players in the state, and Corona del Mar will be one of the top teams in the county this season. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Mandalay Rennon is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Mia Tuaniga is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Foothill’s Grace Cannon is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Los Alamitos’ Abby Karich is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) San Juan Hills’ Abby Dayton is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Trabuco Hills’ Kelly Negron is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) San Clemente’s Kirra Schulz is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Natalie Berty is the 2018 SCNG SoCal Varsity girls volleyball Player of the Year. Photographed at the Meruelo Athletic Center in Santa Ana on Tuesday, December 4, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Foothill’s Randy Post is The Register’s All-County girls volleyball Coach of Year. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Mandalay Rennon is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Trabuco Hills’ Kelly Negron is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Corona del Mar’s Kendall Kipp in Newport Beach on Monday, Sep. 10, 2018 is considered one of the top volley ball players in the state, and Corona del Mar will be one of the top teams in the county this season. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG) San Juan Hills’ Abby Dayton is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Mia Tuaniga is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Foothill’s Grace Cannon is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Los Alamitos’ Abby Karich is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) San Clemente’s Kirra Schulz is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Mandalay Rennon is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Natalie Berty is the 2018 SCNG SoCal Varsity girls volleyball Player of the Year. Photographed at the Meruelo Athletic Center in Santa Ana on Tuesday, December 4, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Mandalay Rennon is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) San Juan Hills’ Abby Dayton is on The Register’s 2018 All-County girls volleyball team. Photographed at Foothill High in Santa Ana on Thursday, December 13, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Natalie Berty is the 2018 SCNG SoCal Varsity girls volleyball Player of the Year. Photographed at the Meruelo Athletic Center in Santa Ana on Tuesday, December 4, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) Corona del Mar’s Kendall Kipp in Newport Beach on Monday, Sep. 10, 2018 is considered one of the top volley ball players in the state, and Corona del Mar will be one of the top teams in the county this season. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG) Mater Dei’s Natalie Berty is the 2018 SCNG SoCal Varsity girls volleyball Player of the Year. Photographed at the Meruelo Athletic Center in Santa Ana on Tuesday, December 4, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) The Register’s All-County girls volleyball team for 2018: ALL-COUNTY VOLLEYBALL First Team Natalie Berty, Mater Dei, Sr., OH The Register’s Orange County player of the year. Berty signed with Stanford and was CIF-Southern Section Division 1 player of the year. Grace Cannon, Foothill, Sr., MB Cannon was Crestview League MVP and All-CIF Division 1 first team. She signed with Utah Abby Dayton, San Juan Hills, Sr., OH She had a team-high 324 kills for the South Coast League champions. She was an All-CIF Division 1 selection and signed with BYU. RELATED All-County girls volleyball teams Player of the Year: Mater Dei’s Natalie Berty Coach of the Year: Foothill’s Randy Post Abby Karich, Los Alamitos, Jr., OH Karich was CIF-SS Division 2 player of the year as the Griffins won the Division 2 championship. She committed to Utah. Kendall Kipp, Corona del Mar, Sr., OH She totaled 505 kills for the Surf League champions. Kipp was All-CIF Division 1 first team, an Under Armour All-American and signed with Stanford. Kelly Negron, Trabuco Hills, Sr., S Negron had 1,061 assists for the Mustangs who advanced to the CIF-SS Division 2 finals. Negron, a UC Irvine signee, was selected All-CIF Division 2. Mandalay Rennon, Mater Dei, Sr., L A high-energy player, the 5-foot-3 Rennon led the state-champion Monarchs in digs with 527 and was second on the team in aces with 47. An All-CIF Division 1 selection and she signed with Northwestern. Kirra Schulz, San Clemente, Sr., OH Not the tallest outside hitter around at 5-foot-9, Schulz was the leader of a Tritons team that went undefeated in the Sea View League. She was an All-CIF Division 1 team selection. Mia Tuaniga, Mater Dei, Jr., S She wowed crowds with her high-velocity serves and on-target sets. Tuaniga, an All-CIF Division 1 selection who committed to Long Beach State, was second on the state-champion Monarchs in kills with 269 and led the team in aces (57) and assists (660). Second Team Eliza Cannon, Foothill, Sr., S Rachel Fairbanks, Foothill, So., S Brielle Mullally, Mater Dei, Sr., S Soren Patchell, Laguna Beach, Jr., S Kristina Pepek, Mater Dei, Sr., MB Gwen Russell, Cypress, Sr., Opp Jill Schneggenburger, Beckman, Sr., OH Jessica Smith, Aliso Niguel, So., OH Starr Williams, Los Alamitos, So., OH
18 Dec 18
Press Enterprise
LuLaRoe, the Corona-based husband-and-wife-operated fashion wholesaler that markets its merchandise through individual freelance salespeople, has been sued for more than $48.7 million by its major supplier, according to court documents. Suit alleges creation of shell companies The lawsuit, filed Nov. 29 in Riverside County Superior Court by Providence Industries, alleges that LuLaRoe has not paid for any of the clothing it ordered from Providence more than seven months ago. It also accuses the company and its founders, Mark and DeAnne Stidham, of creating numerous shell companies to hide its assets from Providence and other creditors. Seven of those alleged shell companies were named as co-defendants in the suit. The lawsuit additionally claims there are reasons to believe that LuLaRoe is becoming insolvent, pointing out that a court ruling in California directs an insolvent company to place its remaining assets in a trust fund so creditors can be paid. “The plaintiff believes that LuLaRoe has sold the products and absconded with the proceeds of the sale without paying plaintiffs for the very same products,” the suit reads. Long Beach-based Providence Industries, which designs, manufactures and distributes clothing, said the money from those sales is funding a “lavish lifestyle” for LuLaRoe’s principals. LuLaRoe says the claims are without merit A LuLaRoe spokesperson declined to discuss any of the specifics mentioned in the suit. “We believe the claims in this case are completely without merit and will fight vigorously against them,” the spokesperson in an email. “Given this is pending litigation, we cannot comment on the specifics.” The company has said sales in 2017 hit $2.3 billion. The suit contends that LuLaRoe never intended to pay its bills for the material it has purchased. Providence Industries’ representatives claim that, in September, Mark Stidham said, “Look, guys, I am not going to pay you guys a (expletive) dime unless a judge orders me to pay it, and DeAnne and I will take our two to three hundred million dollars to the Bahamas, and (expletive) everything.” According to the lawsuit, the Stidhams have acquired assets with the intent of shielding LuLaRoe from creditors. These assets include companies that own expensive race cars, private airplanes, a distribution facility in South Carolina and a ranch in Wyoming. The suit claims they own 17 individual properties, all set up as limited liability companies. Thirteen of those property-related LLCs were set up in December 2017, after a series of class action lawsuits were filed against LuLaRoe late in that year, according to the suit. A multitude of legal actions The 2017 legal actions — as many as 13 lawsuits —  were filed by retailers, private citizens who signed up with LuLaRoe to buy clothing from the company and sell it at a markup, either online, door-to-door or at parties. At one point there were close to 80,000 retailers, called “independent fashion consultants,” across the country. The suits alleged that LuLaRoe was operating a pyramid scheme, that it was maintaining an unfair policy for the return of unsold merchandise and that it had provided some poorly made products That, in turn, caused many salespeople to leave the company, which hurt its bottom line. The November 2018 suit maintains that the magnitude of this decline was not disclosed to Provident, to induce the company to continue to supply LuLaRoe. Riverside County’s Superior Court has set a May 28, 2019 date for a case management conference.
18 Dec 18
Redlands Daily Facts
LuLaRoe, the Corona-based husband-and-wife-operated fashion wholesaler that markets its merchandise through individual freelance salespeople, has been sued for more than $48.7 million by its major supplier, according to court documents. Suit alleges creation of shell companies The lawsuit, filed Nov. 29 in Riverside County Superior Court by Providence Industries, alleges that LuLaRoe has not paid for any of the clothing it ordered from Providence more than seven months ago. It also accuses the company and its founders, Mark and DeAnne Stidham, of creating numerous shell companies to hide its assets from Providence and other creditors. Seven of those alleged shell companies were named as co-defendants in the suit. The lawsuit additionally claims there are reasons to believe that LuLaRoe is becoming insolvent, pointing out that a court ruling in California directs an insolvent company to place its remaining assets in a trust fund so creditors can be paid. “The plaintiff believes that LuLaRoe has sold the products and absconded with the proceeds of the sale without paying plaintiffs for the very same products,” the suit reads. Long Beach-based Providence Industries, which designs, manufactures and distributes clothing, said the money from those sales is funding a “lavish lifestyle” for LuLaRoe’s principals. LuLaRoe says the claims are without merit A LuLaRoe spokesperson declined to discuss any of the specifics mentioned in the suit. “We believe the claims in this case are completely without merit and will fight vigorously against them,” the spokesperson in an email. “Given this is pending litigation, we cannot comment on the specifics.” The company has said sales in 2017 hit $2.3 billion. The suit contends that LuLaRoe never intended to pay its bills for the material it has purchased. Providence Industries’ representatives claim that, in September, Mark Stidham said, “Look, guys, I am not going to pay you guys a (expletive) dime unless a judge orders me to pay it, and DeAnne and I will take our two to three hundred million dollars to the Bahamas, and (expletive) everything.” According to the lawsuit, the Stidhams have acquired assets with the intent of shielding LuLaRoe from creditors. These assets include companies that own expensive race cars, private airplanes, a distribution facility in South Carolina and a ranch in Wyoming. The suit claims they own 17 individual properties, all set up as limited liability companies. Thirteen of those property-related LLCs were set up in December 2017, after a series of class action lawsuits were filed against LuLaRoe late in that year, according to the suit. A multitude of legal actions The 2017 legal actions — as many as 13 lawsuits —  were filed by retailers, private citizens who signed up with LuLaRoe to buy clothing from the company and sell it at a markup, either online, door-to-door or at parties. At one point there were close to 80,000 retailers, called “independent fashion consultants,” across the country. The suits alleged that LuLaRoe was operating a pyramid scheme, that it was maintaining an unfair policy for the return of unsold merchandise and that it had provided some poorly made products That, in turn, caused many salespeople to leave the company, which hurt its bottom line. The November 2018 suit maintains that the magnitude of this decline was not disclosed to Provident, to induce the company to continue to supply LuLaRoe. Riverside County’s Superior Court has set a May 28, 2019 date for a case management conference.
18 Dec 18
Daily Bulletin
LuLaRoe, the Corona-based husband-and-wife-operated fashion wholesaler that markets its merchandise through individual freelance salespeople, has been sued for more than $48.7 million by its major supplier, according to court documents. Suit alleges creation of shell companies The lawsuit, filed Nov. 29 in Riverside County Superior Court by Providence Industries, alleges that LuLaRoe has not paid for any of the clothing it ordered from Providence more than seven months ago. It also accuses the company and its founders, Mark and DeAnne Stidham, of creating numerous shell companies to hide its assets from Providence and other creditors. Seven of those alleged shell companies were named as co-defendants in the suit. The lawsuit additionally claims there are reasons to believe that LuLaRoe is becoming insolvent, pointing out that a court ruling in California directs an insolvent company to place its remaining assets in a trust fund so creditors can be paid. “The plaintiff believes that LuLaRoe has sold the products and absconded with the proceeds of the sale without paying plaintiffs for the very same products,” the suit reads. Long Beach-based Providence Industries, which designs, manufactures and distributes clothing, said the money from those sales is funding a “lavish lifestyle” for LuLaRoe’s principals. LuLaRoe says the claims are without merit A LuLaRoe spokesperson declined to discuss any of the specifics mentioned in the suit. “We believe the claims in this case are completely without merit and will fight vigorously against them,” the spokesperson in an email. “Given this is pending litigation, we cannot comment on the specifics.” The company has said sales in 2017 hit $2.3 billion. The suit contends that LuLaRoe never intended to pay its bills for the material it has purchased. Providence Industries’ representatives claim that, in September, Mark Stidham said, “Look, guys, I am not going to pay you guys a (expletive) dime unless a judge orders me to pay it, and DeAnne and I will take our two to three hundred million dollars to the Bahamas, and (expletive) everything.” According to the lawsuit, the Stidhams have acquired assets with the intent of shielding LuLaRoe from creditors. These assets include companies that own expensive race cars, private airplanes, a distribution facility in South Carolina and a ranch in Wyoming. The suit claims they own 17 individual properties, all set up as limited liability companies. Thirteen of those property-related LLCs were set up in December 2017, after a series of class action lawsuits were filed against LuLaRoe late in that year, according to the suit. A multitude of legal actions The 2017 legal actions — as many as 13 lawsuits —  were filed by retailers, private citizens who signed up with LuLaRoe to buy clothing from the company and sell it at a markup, either online, door-to-door or at parties. At one point there were close to 80,000 retailers, called “independent fashion consultants,” across the country. The suits alleged that LuLaRoe was operating a pyramid scheme, that it was maintaining an unfair policy for the return of unsold merchandise and that it had provided some poorly made products That, in turn, caused many salespeople to leave the company, which hurt its bottom line. The November 2018 suit maintains that the magnitude of this decline was not disclosed to Provident, to induce the company to continue to supply LuLaRoe. Riverside County’s Superior Court has set a May 28, 2019 date for a case management conference.
18 Dec 18
SCNG
LuLaRoe, the Corona-based husband-and-wife-operated fashion wholesaler that markets its merchandise through individual freelance salespeople, has been sued for more than $48.7 million by its major supplier, according to court documents. Suit alleges creation of shell companies The lawsuit, filed Nov. 29 in Riverside County Superior Court by Providence Industries, alleges that LuLaRoe has not paid for any of the clothing it ordered from Providence more than seven months ago. It also accuses the company and its founders, Mark and DeAnne Stidham, of creating numerous shell companies to hide its assets from Providence and other creditors. Seven of those alleged shell companies were named as co-defendants in the suit. The lawsuit additionally claims there are reasons to believe that LuLaRoe is becoming insolvent, pointing out that a court ruling in California directs an insolvent company to place its remaining assets in a trust fund so creditors can be paid. “The plaintiff believes that LuLaRoe has sold the products and absconded with the proceeds of the sale without paying plaintiffs for the very same products,” the suit reads. Long Beach-based Providence Industries, which designs, manufactures and distributes clothing, said the money from those sales is funding a “lavish lifestyle” for LuLaRoe’s principals. LuLaRoe says the claims are without merit A LuLaRoe spokesperson declined to discuss any of the specifics mentioned in the suit. “We believe the claims in this case are completely without merit and will fight vigorously against them,” the spokesperson in an email. “Given this is pending litigation, we cannot comment on the specifics.” The company has said sales in 2017 hit $2.3 billion. The suit contends that LuLaRoe never intended to pay its bills for the material it has purchased. Providence Industries’ representatives claim that, in September, Mark Stidham said, “Look, guys, I am not going to pay you guys a (expletive) dime unless a judge orders me to pay it, and DeAnne and I will take our two to three hundred million dollars to the Bahamas, and (expletive) everything.” According to the lawsuit, the Stidhams have acquired assets with the intent of shielding LuLaRoe from creditors. These assets include companies that own expensive race cars, private airplanes, a distribution facility in South Carolina and a ranch in Wyoming. The suit claims they own 17 individual properties, all set up as limited liability companies. Thirteen of those property-related LLCs were set up in December 2017, after a series of class action lawsuits were filed against LuLaRoe late in that year, according to the suit. A multitude of legal actions The 2017 legal actions — as many as 13 lawsuits —  were filed by retailers, private citizens who signed up with LuLaRoe to buy clothing from the company and sell it at a markup, either online, door-to-door or at parties. At one point there were close to 80,000 retailers, called “independent fashion consultants,” across the country. The suits alleged that LuLaRoe was operating a pyramid scheme, that it was maintaining an unfair policy for the return of unsold merchandise and that it had provided some poorly made products That, in turn, caused many salespeople to leave the company, which hurt its bottom line. The November 2018 suit maintains that the magnitude of this decline was not disclosed to Provident, to induce the company to continue to supply LuLaRoe. Riverside County’s Superior Court has set a May 28, 2019 date for a case management conference.
18 Dec 18
ABCpr Media Group -Community News, Public Relations and Advertising Services

The City of Eastvale News covers local news for Eastvale, Norco, Corona, Jurupa Valley, MiraLoma, Chino and more. Click the following link to access the complete issue in pdf format: 

18 Dec 18
Orange County Register
The boys basketball tournaments schedule for Tuesday through Saturday, Dec. 18-22. BASKETBALL LIBERTY CHRISTIAN TOURNAMENT Tuesday, Dec. 18 Brethren Christian vs. Orange County Christian, 3 p.m. Central City vs. Ambassador, 4:30 p.m. Santa Ana Valley vs. Mann UCLA, 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19 Mann UCLA vs. Brethren Christian, 3 p.m. Santa Ana Valley vs. Central City, 4:30 p.m. Orange County Christian vs. Ambassador, 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 20 Fifth-place game, 3 p.m. Third-place game, 4:30 p.m. Championship, 6 p.m.   ORANGE COUNTY NORTH/SOUTH CHALLENGE At Tesoro High Friday, Dec. 21 San Juan Hills vs. Godinez, 3:30 p.m. Capistrano Valley vs. Valencia, 5 p.m. Aliso Niguel vs. Tustin, 6:30 p.m. San Clemente vs. Cypress, 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22 Capistrano Valley Christian vs. Pacifica, 12:30 p.m. El Toro vs. Corona del Mar, 2 p.m. Dana Hills vs. Woodbridge, 3:30 p.m. Mission Viejo vs. Beckman, 5 p.m. Tesoro vs. Newport Harbor, 6:30 p.m. Saddleback Valley Christian vs. Northwood, 8 p.m.    
18 Dec 18
SCNG
The boys basketball tournaments schedule for Tuesday through Saturday, Dec. 18-22. BASKETBALL LIBERTY CHRISTIAN TOURNAMENT Tuesday, Dec. 18 Brethren Christian vs. Orange County Christian, 3 p.m. Central City vs. Ambassador, 4:30 p.m. Santa Ana Valley vs. Mann UCLA, 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19 Mann UCLA vs. Brethren Christian, 3 p.m. Santa Ana Valley vs. Central City, 4:30 p.m. Orange County Christian vs. Ambassador, 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 20 Fifth-place game, 3 p.m. Third-place game, 4:30 p.m. Championship, 6 p.m.   ORANGE COUNTY NORTH/SOUTH CHALLENGE At Tesoro High Friday, Dec. 21 San Juan Hills vs. Godinez, 3:30 p.m. Capistrano Valley vs. Valencia, 5 p.m. Aliso Niguel vs. Tustin, 6:30 p.m. San Clemente vs. Cypress, 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22 Capistrano Valley Christian vs. Pacifica, 12:30 p.m. El Toro vs. Corona del Mar, 2 p.m. Dana Hills vs. Woodbridge, 3:30 p.m. Mission Viejo vs. Beckman, 5 p.m. Tesoro vs. Newport Harbor, 6:30 p.m. Saddleback Valley Christian vs. Northwood, 8 p.m.