Costa

20 May 19
Frenchy Home & Lifestyle

My partner and I have been going to Cyprus for over 14 years now and we are never bored of it. Life is so different and chilled over there and the sun is shining most of the time which makes a huge difference to our UK weather! Paphos is our destination, in fact, more like […]

20 May 19
Noticias Ultimas

Atresmedia estrenará una serie basada en la prostitución masculina la próxima temporada

20 May 19
Notiziario Estero

Quali sono i principali settori di investimento per fare affari in Albania? E cosa conviene vendere nel Paese al di là dell’Adriatico?

20 May 19
News & Press Release Wire

MI exclusively added Water Sport Sunglasses market study that gives in-depth investigation regarding the current scenario of the Market size, share, demand, growth, trends, and forecast in the coming years. The report firstly introduced the Water Sport Sunglasses market basics like definitions, classifications, applications, and market overview; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures, raw materials […]

20 May 19
News & Press Release Wire

MI exclusively added India and Asia Pacific Button Mushroom market study that gives in-depth investigation regarding the current scenario of the Market size, share, demand, growth, trends, and forecast in the coming years. The report firstly introduced the India and Asia Pacific Button Mushroom market basics like definitions, classifications, applications, and market overview; product specifications; […]

20 May 19
MENA Solidarity Network

Trade unionists, MPs and campaigners have launched the open letter below to build solidarity across the labour and trade union movement around the world with the uprisings in Sudan and Algeria. Find out more about how you can get involved in this campaign below.  Dear comrade, The revolutions in Sudan and Algeria are reaching a […]

20 May 19
Mex Mads

Game of Thrones llegó a su final después de ocho largos años. La temporada final tuvo sus bajos a lo largo de cada uno de sus capítulos y su cierre no convence a todos. Sin embargo esta serie marcó un antes y un después en la televisión como la conocemos. ¡ESTA NOTA CONTIENE SPOILERS! El […]

20 May 19
Retired in Costa Rica

The trip photo gallery is completed! You can see my photos of this latest birding trip at: https://charliedoggett.smugmug.com/TRIPS/2019-May-9-15-Selva-Verde-Lodge-Sarapiqui Or click this print screen image of the gallery:   And how about my earlier visit to this same hotel with even more birds? See the TRIP GALLERY:  2016 December 23-27 – Selva Verde Lodge, Sarapiqui   or […]

20 May 19
The Mercury News
MARTINEZ — Sheriff’s deputies raided the jail cells of 13 suspected North Richmond gang members last year, searching for “paperwork” related to a nonfatal shooting last year that police say spurned a gang-related homicide. The raids — which were publicly detailed for the first time in a series of legal motions in March and April — turned up numerous copies of a police report related to a January 2018 shooting involving brothers Jermaine Hicks Sr. and Darjon Hicks, two suspected members of the decades-old Project Trojans gang in North Richmond. Authorities believe the Project Trojans are behind an attempted killing on a witness in the case, where the hitman killed the wrong guy by mistake. The raids targeted suspected members of the Swerve Team, another North Richmond gang composed primarily of children and nephews of Project Trojans members. Attorneys for four of the men, in failed motions to throw out evidence seized in the raids, argued the raids were based on warrants that painted the North Richmond and Oakland communities with a broad brush and set a “dangerous precedent,” handing too much power to law enforcement. It’s all centered on the arrest last September of 39-year-old William Melvin Edwards Jr., a former clerk at the Contra Costa County Public Defender’s office who was hired there after serving a prison term for killing a witness in an Oakland murder case in 2001. Edwards was charged with conspiracy and murder the June 2018 killing of 22-year-old Taison Calderon-Lopez, a Richmond resident who authorities say Edwards mistook for the man who was to testify against the Hicks brothers. Authorities say that in order to silence the witness, Project Trojan members solicited Edwards, an alleged member of a notorious Oakland gang called Ghost Town, using an unredacted police report with the the witness’ information. In one April 2018 recorded jail call to his son, Dorjan Hicks alleged referenced the plan, referring to Edwards by his nickname “Bop.” “Me and Slim (Jermain Hicks Sr.) ready to holler at Bop,” Hicks allegedly said, adding that another man he contacted would “Let Bop know what time it is.” In 2001, Edwards shot and killed Chance Grundy in Oakland, weeks before Grundy was to testify in a murder case. He reportedly told another man, “That’s what you get for snitching.” Edwards was arrested two months later, but the case against him took a hit when the key witness disappeared and was believed to have fled the state, according to court records. In 2006, Edwards pleaded no contest to voluntary manslaughter, and the murder charges were reduced. He was sentenced to 15 years in state prison, with three years credit for time served. After his release, Edwards marketed himself as a changed man who’d obtained paralegal degrees in prison, and eventually was hired by the public defender’s office. His tenure there ended in October 2017, roughly eight months before the homicide. In a written statement last year, Chief Public Defender Robin Lipetzky said she conducted an investigation into whether Edwards ever “accessed sensitive information while he worked for,” and said she had “no reason to believe” that he did. “As you know, the allegations against Mr. Edwards stem from a time long after he worked in our office,” she added. Controversy over jail raids Following the raids, attorneys for several of the 13 inmates filed motions to throw out evidence that was seized. In an April year, Judge Lewis Davis denied a motion filed by four defendants, saying the warrants were appropriately written. Attorneys for the men described the raid as a police “fishing expedition” an an excuse to snoop through privileged attorney/client communications. Even innocuous items, like family pictures, were seized, said defense lawyer Chris Weir, who represents one of the 13 inmates, alleged Swerve Team member Ronald Fluker. Weir attacked authorities’ stated justification for the warrant, that the Project Trojans, Swerve Team, and Ghost Town gangs were closely associated or formed an alliance. He said the warrants were written so broadly they could “just as easily support searching everyone in North Richmond or Oakland.” In denying the motion, Davis pointed to 1776 writings of founding father John Henry Adams regarding writs of assistance, a type of search warrant that essentially said, “take this piece of paper and do what you want,” Davis said. . “That’s a general warrant,” Davis added. “That’s not what we have here.” Meanwhile, the case against Edwards continues. His preliminary hearing was set for Monday but is being delayed. His attorney, Paul Feuerwerker, cautioned against buying into the prosecution’s theory of a conspiracy involving multiple gangs. “For as long as I’ve been around in this county, law enforcement has always had, in my opinion, an over-the-top view of anyone associated with North Richmond,” Feuerwerker said. “Oftentimes they are proven to be wrong.”
20 May 19
East Bay Times
MARTINEZ — Sheriff’s deputies raided the jail cells of 13 suspected North Richmond gang members last year, searching for “paperwork” related to a nonfatal shooting last year that police say spurned a gang-related homicide. The raids — which were publicly detailed for the first time in a series of legal motions in March and April — turned up numerous copies of a police report related to a January 2018 shooting involving brothers Jermaine Hicks Sr. and Darjon Hicks, two suspected members of the decades-old Project Trojans gang in North Richmond. Authorities believe the Project Trojans are behind an attempted killing on a witness in the case, where the hitman killed the wrong guy by mistake. The raids targeted suspected members of the Swerve Team, another North Richmond gang composed primarily of children and nephews of Project Trojans members. Attorneys for four of the men, in failed motions to throw out evidence seized in the raids, argued the raids were based on warrants that painted the North Richmond and Oakland communities with a broad brush and set a “dangerous precedent,” handing too much power to law enforcement. It’s all centered on the arrest last September of 39-year-old William Melvin Edwards Jr., a former clerk at the Contra Costa County Public Defender’s office who was hired there after serving a prison term for killing a witness in an Oakland murder case in 2001. Edwards was charged with conspiracy and murder the June 2018 killing of 22-year-old Taison Calderon-Lopez, a Richmond resident who authorities say Edwards mistook for the man who was to testify against the Hicks brothers. Authorities say that in order to silence the witness, Project Trojan members solicited Edwards, an alleged member of a notorious Oakland gang called Ghost Town, using an unredacted police report with the the witness’ information. In one April 2018 recorded jail call to his son, Dorjan Hicks alleged referenced the plan, referring to Edwards by his nickname “Bop.” “Me and Slim (Jermain Hicks Sr.) ready to holler at Bop,” Hicks allegedly said, adding that another man he contacted would “Let Bop know what time it is.” In 2001, Edwards shot and killed Chance Grundy in Oakland, weeks before Grundy was to testify in a murder case. He reportedly told another man, “That’s what you get for snitching.” Edwards was arrested two months later, but the case against him took a hit when the key witness disappeared and was believed to have fled the state, according to court records. In 2006, Edwards pleaded no contest to voluntary manslaughter, and the murder charges were reduced. He was sentenced to 15 years in state prison, with three years credit for time served. After his release, Edwards marketed himself as a changed man who’d obtained paralegal degrees in prison, and eventually was hired by the public defender’s office. His tenure there ended in October 2017, roughly eight months before the homicide. In a written statement last year, Chief Public Defender Robin Lipetzky said she conducted an investigation into whether Edwards ever “accessed sensitive information while he worked for,” and said she had “no reason to believe” that he did. “As you know, the allegations against Mr. Edwards stem from a time long after he worked in our office,” she added. Controversy over jail raids Following the raids, attorneys for several of the 13 inmates filed motions to throw out evidence that was seized. In an April year, Judge Lewis Davis denied a motion filed by four defendants, saying the warrants were appropriately written. Attorneys for the men described the raid as a police “fishing expedition” an an excuse to snoop through privileged attorney/client communications. Even innocuous items, like family pictures, were seized, said defense lawyer Chris Weir, who represents one of the 13 inmates, alleged Swerve Team member Ronald Fluker. Weir attacked authorities’ stated justification for the warrant, that the Project Trojans, Swerve Team, and Ghost Town gangs were closely associated or formed an alliance. He said the warrants were written so broadly they could “just as easily support searching everyone in North Richmond or Oakland.” In denying the motion, Davis pointed to 1776 writings of founding father John Henry Adams regarding writs of assistance, a type of search warrant that essentially said, “take this piece of paper and do what you want,” Davis said. . “That’s a general warrant,” Davis added. “That’s not what we have here.” Meanwhile, the case against Edwards continues. His preliminary hearing was set for Monday but is being delayed. His attorney, Paul Feuerwerker, cautioned against buying into the prosecution’s theory of a conspiracy involving multiple gangs. “For as long as I’ve been around in this county, law enforcement has always had, in my opinion, an over-the-top view of anyone associated with North Richmond,” Feuerwerker said. “Oftentimes they are proven to be wrong.”
20 May 19
L8night with Choccy

Some people figure out what they want to do with their lives at an early age. For instance, Choccy thought he would be a doctor or chiropractor. Yeah, right!? Our next guest is Dane Hesse. He grew up aspiring to a be lawyer. He got into Vanguard University to pursue his career, but fortunately he […]

20 May 19
9 weeks. 23 dates. 1 lonely bitch.

Saturday February 2nd Only 3 days have passed since I left your house. Since then, my stomach has recovered, and grad school applications are but a worry of the past. I feel satisfied – free. On the drive up I stop at Walmart to pick up condoms for some peace of mind. We haven’t even […]

20 May 19
Daily Breeze
Dealing with adversity is the measuring stick in sports as well as in life. Jay Uhlman learned this lesson while still a teenager. A center fielder by trade, he found himself playing shortstop as a senior at Redondo High because the Seahawks had a great big void there. Tim Ammentorp, the Redondo coach back then, remembered a star-it play at short during an inter-squad game late in Uhlman’s junior season. Why was he at shortstop? Somebody had to play there. Plus it was a fun break from the drudgery that comes from repetition in practice. “He probably would have preferred to stay in center,” Ammentorp said recently. “That’s where he was comfortable. But he was a team guy and said, ‘If that’s what you need, that’s what I’ll do.’ ” It was not fun early in his senior season. There was an unfortunate game at Saugus that Uhlman cannot forget. He was in a hitting slump — 0-for-13 he vividly remembers. As happens when the baseball gods have turned their backs on you, he hit a rocket up the middle. It became just another out in the scorebook because the out-of-position shortstop was standing there to catch the ball. It was even worse in the field. A ground ball ricocheted off his forehead. With studied gallows humor his players will recognize, Ammentorp told him, “Well, it can’t get any worse than this.” The measure of Uhlman is it got better. It got much better as he became an all-star, an MLB drafted player, a leader at shortstop for Harbor College and Nevada Reno University and, for the past 22 years, a top-of-the-line college coach. He currently is associate head coach at Oregon for George Horton, better known in these parts for taking Cal State Fullerton to the College World Series six times in 11 seasons while winning the championship in 2004. Looking at Uhlman’s impressive resume, you cannot help but wonder about those gods of baseball. Why has he not been a head coach since he was learning on the job during two successful seasons at Harbor College in 2000-2001? This brings us to Long Beach State’s search for a baseball coach. Uhlman clearly is someone the 49ers need to interview. Not given to self promotion, he said, “I just like to keep my head down and keep pounding away and let who I am and my work speak for itself.” Those who have known him from the beginning do not hesitate to speak in his behalf. “At Harbor he was with a lot of good athletes,” Ammentorp said. “He learned that unless you’re Darryl Strawberry, and that’s a name from the past, you’re not going to get there unless you work hard. He was willing to put in the time. That carries over to coaching.” The word on the street is the Long Beach State people are looking for someone with a history at the school. They clarify this by explaining they’re not looking for a 49er, they’re looking for a Dirtbag, a nod to their gritty baseball history. While Uhlman did not play or coach there, he has Dirtbag roots as a young fan. “We went to Long Beach State games,” he recalled. “We watched Chris Gomez and Jason Gomez.” Then there is the historic similarity between the Dirtbags and Harbor College, where the unofficial nickname is the Rats. The rough-and-tumble baseball culture of the two programs is cut from the same cloth. “Jay was just a hard-nosed very, very intelligent baseball player, a student of the game who was a baseball player, not just someone paying baseball,” Tony Bloomfield, his Harbor coach, said. “He took as many ground balls before and after practice as any player I have ever had.” Off the field, Uhlman impressed Jim O’Brien, the former Harbor baseball coach who as athletic director hired him, by being “very well organized.” “Jay kept his office neater than anyone else,” he said. Bloomfield has an Uhlman story. “I was still taking ground balls with the players,” he said with the pride of a former shortstop who prided himself in still having better range than his players, not all of whom appreciated the little drama this created. “Jay did not shy away,” he said. “He loved the competition.” Along with knowing how to deal with adversity, paste that in Uhlman’s resume. Clearing out the mini-notebook: Opinion — Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka and Frank Vogel, his new coach, talked the talk during their Monday press conference in El Segundo with Pelinka taking the high road when asked about shots taken by Magic Johnson, his former boss. Now they have a much tougher task, demonstrating they can do the job. … Gridlock — San Pedro native Andy Lopez, the former Mira Costa High, Cal State Dominguez Hills, Pepperdine and Arizona baseball coach now a commentator for the Pac-12 Network, groaned about needing 55 minutes to drive from LAX to USC Friday afternoon. … Bottom line — It is easy to dismiss Dave Roberts due to the analytical dictates from upper management. This misses the point that Roberts knows his stuff. Mike Waldner can be reached at mwsptcol@aol.col.
20 May 19
My Beautiful Life

A sunny monday! My day started with my pre-chemo assessment and bloods in preparation for tomorrow! All went well and my efficient nurses thought it was best to leave the needle and tubes attached to save me having to be stabbed again with another needle a few hours later…. ouch! So I’m walking around looking […]

20 May 19
Press Telegram
Dealing with adversity is the measuring stick in sports as well as in life. Jay Uhlman learned this lesson while still a teenager. A center fielder by trade, he found himself playing shortstop as a senior at Redondo High because the Seahawks had a great big void there. Tim Ammentorp, the Redondo coach back then, remembered a star-it play at short during an inter-squad game late in Uhlman’s junior season. Why was he at shortstop? Somebody had to play there. Plus it was a fun break from the drudgery that comes from repetition in practice. “He probably would have preferred to stay in center,” Ammentorp said recently. “That’s where he was comfortable. But he was a team guy and said, ‘If that’s what you need, that’s what I’ll do.’ ” It was not fun early in his senior season. There was an unfortunate game at Saugus that Uhlman cannot forget. He was in a hitting slump — 0-for-13 he vividly remembers. As happens when the baseball gods have turned their backs on you, he hit a rocket up the middle. It became just another out in the scorebook because the out-of-position shortstop was standing there to catch the ball. It was even worse in the field. A ground ball ricocheted off his forehead. With studied gallows humor his players will recognize, Ammentorp told him, “Well, it can’t get any worse than this.” The measure of Uhlman is it got better. It got much better as he became an all-star, an MLB drafted player, a leader at shortstop for Harbor College and Nevada Reno University and, for the past 22 years, a top-of-the-line college coach. He currently is associate head coach at Oregon for George Horton, better known in these parts for taking Cal State Fullerton to the College World Series six times in 11 seasons while winning the championship in 2004. Looking at Uhlman’s impressive resume, you cannot help but wonder about those gods of baseball. Why has he not been a head coach since he was learning on the job during two successful seasons at Harbor College in 2000-2001? This brings us to Long Beach State’s search for a baseball coach. Uhlman clearly is someone the 49ers need to interview. Not given to self promotion, he said, “I just like to keep my head down and keep pounding away and let who I am and my work speak for itself.” Those who have known him from the beginning do not hesitate to speak in his behalf. “At Harbor he was with a lot of good athletes,” Ammentorp said. “He learned that unless you’re Darryl Strawberry, and that’s a name from the past, you’re not going to get there unless you work hard. He was willing to put in the time. That carries over to coaching.” The word on the street is the Long Beach State people are looking for someone with a history at the school. They clarify this by explaining they’re not looking for a 49er, they’re looking for a Dirtbag, a nod to their gritty baseball history. While Uhlman did not play or coach there, he has Dirtbag roots as a young fan. “We went to Long Beach State games,” he recalled. “We watched Chris Gomez and Jason Gomez.” Then there is the historic similarity between the Dirtbags and Harbor College, where the unofficial nickname is the Rats. The rough-and-tumble baseball culture of the two programs is cut from the same cloth. “Jay was just a hard-nosed very, very intelligent baseball player, a student of the game who was a baseball player, not just someone paying baseball,” Tony Bloomfield, his Harbor coach, said. “He took as many ground balls before and after practice as any player I have ever had.” Off the field, Uhlman impressed Jim O’Brien, the former Harbor baseball coach who as athletic director hired him, by being “very well organized.” “Jay kept his office neater than anyone else,” he said. Bloomfield has an Uhlman story. “I was still taking ground balls with the players,” he said with the pride of a former shortstop who prided himself in still having better range than his players, not all of whom appreciated the little drama this created. “Jay did not shy away,” he said. “He loved the competition.” Along with knowing how to deal with adversity, paste that in Uhlman’s resume. Clearing out the mini-notebook: Opinion — Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka and Frank Vogel, his new coach, talked the talk during their Monday press conference in El Segundo with Pelinka taking the high road when asked about shots taken by Magic Johnson, his former boss. Now they have a much tougher task, demonstrating they can do the job. … Gridlock — San Pedro native Andy Lopez, the former Mira Costa High, Cal State Dominguez Hills, Pepperdine and Arizona baseball coach now a commentator for the Pac-12 Network, groaned about needing 55 minutes to drive from LAX to USC Friday afternoon. … Bottom line — It is easy to dismiss Dave Roberts due to the analytical dictates from upper management. This misses the point that Roberts knows his stuff. Mike Waldner can be reached at mwsptcol@aol.col.