Crime

20 Jun 19
Fort Smith/Fayetteville News | 5newsonline KFSM 5NEWS

On New Year’s Eve in 2016, Dasha Fincher was on her way to a pawn shop in Macon, Georgia with her boyfriend. She said she wasn’t nervous when she got pulled over by a police officer, “because we weren’t doing anything wrong.” Dashcam video showed that the pair was calm and cooperative – but things […]

20 Jun 19
Now or Never

There is no question Hizbollah was planning an attack in Canada at Pearson Airport. BY LEO KNIGHT JUNE 19, 2019 Last month a Hizbollah sleeper agent was tried and convicted in New York on multiple charges related to terrorism. And the media hardly noticed. The Canadian media ignored the matter completely.  I should add that Hizbollah […]

20 Jun 19
Ghosts of the Stratosphere

Hello Everyone! It’s Jabroniville, again, with another trip down comic book memory lane with shout out to some of my favorite comic book characters that you might have forgotten about! Hope you enjoy this latest entry! THE SERPENT SOCIETY: The Serpent Society are my favorite Jobber Villains ever! I mean, who else represents that particular […]

20 Jun 19
FOX2548 & WIProud
WASHINGTON DC (NEXSTAR) – Wednesday is June 19th – a day known as Juneteenth by many as it celebrates the end of slavery in America.   For the first time in more than 10 years, Congress talked about payment, or reparations, to the descendants of African slaves.   “A national reparations policy is a moral, democratic and economic imperative,” said actor, producer and activist Danny Glover.   As Blank Panthers stood in silence outside,  Glover joined a panel in front of a House committee to remember his roots. He’s the great-grandson of a former slave who was freed by the Emancipation Proclamation.  “Slavery was a crime against humanity – one which whose impacts we as a society continue to grapple with today,” said Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tennessee)  Cohen and his colleagues revived a conversation that hasn’t happened in Congress in more than a decade – payments, or reparations for descendants of African slaves.   “It is only this group,” U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas) said.   The Texas congresswoman is sponsoring a resolution, which was first introduced three decades ago, to form a commission to get the process going.  Outside Wednesday’s hearing, huge crowds lined the walls to push it forward.    “If we want the America that we talk about, this is the first step,” Derrick Williams, an American Descendants of Slavery (ADOS) Movement member from Virginia said.   Some see the discussion as purely political.   Project 21, a black leadership network, calls reparations a sham that hurts race relations. And on Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell also voiced his opposition.   “We’re always a work in progress in this country, but no one currently alive was responsible for that,” Sen. McConnell (R-Senate Majority Leader)   Members of the panel fired back.  “This rebuttal proffers a strange theory of governance that American accounts are somehow bound by the lifetime of its generations,” said Ta-Nehisi Coates, Distinguished Writer in Residence, Arthur J. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University.   The country has paid other debts— including reparations to Japanese Americans after they were held in internment camps during world war two.  Now, these Americans argue it’s their turn. 
20 Jun 19
Callum McLaughlin

Sadie by Courtney Summers Published by Wednesday Books, 2018 My rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ Sadie is that rare look at trauma, and the dark side of humanity, that manages to be unflinching without ever feeling salacious. The story is told in two parallel narratives. The first follows our title character, hellbent on tracking down […]

20 Jun 19
WRBL
Yesterday, June 19, marked Juneteenth, known as the celebration of the end of slavery in America– and it’s the first time in more than 10 years Congress talked about payment- or reparations- to the descendants of African slaves. As Blank Panthers stood in silence outside, actor Danny Glover joined a panel in front of a House committee to remember his roots. He’s the great grandson of a former slave who was freed by the Emancipation Proclamation. “A national reparations policy is a moral, democratic and economic imperative,” Glover told the committee. Tennessee Congressman Steve Cohen and his colleagues revived a conversation that hasn’t happened in Congress in more than a decade, payments, or reparations, for descendants of African slaves, African Americans. “Slavery was a crime against humanity, one which whose impacts we as a society continue to grapple with today,” Cohen stated. Texas Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee is sponsoring a resolution, first introduced three decades ago, to form a commission to get the process going. A huge crowd lined the walls outside of the hearing to push it forward. “If we want the America that we talk about, this is the first step,” said Derrick Williams with the American Descendants of Slavery Movement. However, Some see the discussion as purely political. Project 21- a black leadership network- calls reparations a sham that hurts race relations. and On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell also voiced his opposition. “We’re always a work in progress in this country, but no one currently alive was responsible for that,” McConnell said. But members of the panel fired back. “This rebuttal proffers a strange theory of governance that American accounts are somehow bound by the lifetime of its generations,” said Ta-Nehisi Coates, Distinguished Writer in Residence, Arthur J. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University. The country has paid other debts— including reparations to Japanese Americans after they were held in internment camps during World War II. Now some Americans say it’s time for reparations for the descendants of slavery.
20 Jun 19
Fiction Writer's Guide to Reality:

The U.S. Army in the Occupation of Germany 1944-1946 (Center of Military History) – https://history.army.mil/html/books/030/30-6/index.html Post by Daniel Cornwall 12/23/2013 Representative questions that can be answered with this resource: How do occupiers see themselves? What problems do people under occupation face? How did the US manage relationships between GIs and German woman? What did a […]

20 Jun 19
KLBK | KAMC | EverythingLubbock
FILE – In this April 10, 2019, file photo, Regina Wells, foreground right, a forensic laboratories supervisor with the Kentucky State Police, demonstrates new crime-fighting technology in Frankfort, Ky. Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky. Now a state board in Texas has asked a growing government provider of the DNA equipment used in those high-profile projects to halt work amid concerns of potentially jeopardized criminal cases, according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, File) AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — With a name that sounds like futuristic fiction, Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky, identified California wildfire victims and verified family connections of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border. Now a state board in Texas has asked a growing government provider of the DNA equipment used in those high-profile projects to halt work amid concerns of potentially jeopardized criminal cases, according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press. Texas is not the only place where the company, Longmont, Colorado-based ANDE, has come under scrutiny. Utah officials say they will likely no longer use Rapid DNA machines for sexual assault investigations, citing a higher degree of technical analysis required, but one case raised concerns about swabs taken from a victim. And when the Arizona Legislature this year considered creating a new statewide DNA database, ANDE helped draft the bill that included language excluding its only U.S. competitor, giving some lawmakers discomfort. “Prosecutors are saying, ‘You’re screwing up our cases,'” said Lynn Garcia, general counsel of the Texas Forensic Science Commission. On Monday, the governor-appointed board sent a letter asking ANDE to “cease any project in Texas involving the use of its Rapid DNA technology” unless it goes through an accredited lab familiar with handling criminal evidence. The commission says ANDE embarked on projects with police and a hospital in Houston without input from prosecutors, leaving them in the dark about evidence they’re required to disclose to criminal suspects. That sent prosecutors scrambling to comply with a 2013 Texas law named after a man who wrongfully spent 25 years in prison after significant evidence in his case was withheld. ANDE spokeswoman Annette Mattern disputed the accusations, saying law enforcement agencies bear the responsibility for evidence handling. She said no issues have been raised regarding ANDE’s equipment. Started in 2004, ANDE is becoming synonymous with Rapid DNA thanks to a run of high-profile projects, including a pilot program on the border with the U.S. government that ended in May. Voluntary cheek swabs were taken from some migrant adults and children to confirm family connections, amid worries by the Trump administration that some migrants were fraudulently posing as parents. Mattern said the company’s technology is “challenging norms” and suggested that some might be struggling to adjust. “If there are procedural issues within the agencies, I’m not surprised because this is new,” she said. “If there is confusion because one group says it has a protocol and another says, ‘Well, it should be different,’ those are good conversations to have. Make it better.” It has left ANDE facing criticism as the company — one of just two manufacturers of Rapid DNA machines in the U.S. — makes an aggressive push into police stations and labs nationwide. Officials in Texas say they fear the company’s actions are setting back a promising technology that has gotten a boost under President Donald Trump, who in 2017 signed the Rapid DNA Act that allows police stations to link machines to the nation’s DNA database. The technology is gaining traction. Although Rapid DNA results aren’t used for courtroom evidence, investigators are embracing a tool that can give them results in a couple hours rather than waiting days or weeks, allowing them to zero in on suspects and solve cases faster. In Texas, the commission said the company’s arrival in Houston has jeopardized the integrity of ongoing criminal cases, although the board did not cite any that had been derailed because of ANDE. Peter Stout, chief executive of the Houston Forensic Science Center, said at least one swab taken from a sexual assault victim was lost in the mail. Mattern said she had no information about a lost sample, but the commission noted other concerns related to the integrity of samples “sent out of state.” Stout rejected ANDE’s assertion that it had no responsibility in how evidence was handled. “It’s a little disingenuous on ANDE’s part because they are so aggressive in marketing this to the officers that this is an investigative tool. And they certainly don’t take the opportunity to explain and point out that you guys need to make sure you’re giving everybody the information,” Stout said. Utah Republican Attorney General Sean Reyes, who purchased two ANDE machines, raves about the technology on his website in a video that includes about 90 seconds of ANDE promotional footage. The machines were purchased for low-priority property and gun crimes but in one case ran evidence from a sexual assault investigation, said Nate Mutter, the office’s assistant chief of investigations. He said technical assistance was needed from ANDE to help analyze the sample. Mutter said it was “very possible” that the Utah law enforcement agency that obtained the swab, which he would not disclose, did not get consent from the victim for a rapid DNA analysis. He acknowledged concerns were raised, but said his office’s reluctance to use the machine again in sexual assault cases is because the analysis requires more technical proficiency. “I would just find it hard to believe that they wouldn’t consent to extra swabs if that meant their case got adjudicated faster, and their rape suspect got held accountable faster,” Mutter said. In Arizona, Mattern defended the company asking for “performance parameters” in the proposed DNA database bill that excluded the company’s chief rival, Thermo Fischer Scientific, saying it wouldn’t have prevented competitors from ultimately meeting the same requirements. Mattern said ANDE later asked to kill the legislation. During a February hearing, Mattern was other ANDE representatives testified in support of the proposal. Some senators questioned whether there were other advocates besides the company. “Limiting that to just one company, or two companies, that can make a lot of money on this makes me uncomfortable,” Arizona Democratic Sen. Jamescita Peshlakai said at the hearing.
20 Jun 19
M.J.Black

What follows here is a true recollection of events which I hope, in some way, will bring about in the reader some understanding of how I came to be where I now am and how I came to know what I now know. My life to this point was, though not unusual, never quite as […]

20 Jun 19
The Irresponsible Reader

Two days in a row where I use denouement in a post. Odd streak. Pretty sure I can guarantee I won’t go for three, though. Sorry for the babbling that’s about to ensue. No, I’m not really, it’s what happens when I get excited. — How To Kill Friends And Implicate People by Jay Stringer […]

20 Jun 19
TODAY NEWS

“AS I stepped into a small house in the middle of…

20 Jun 19
Newsy Today

CLOSE Not all vocal assistants can handle the same applications. We put the test on Siri, Alexa and Google. US TODAY Consider all the things a microphone can build up: voices, noise, wars, conversations, arguments, confessions – even people alone, in a room, destroying themselves. Think of all the things you say in a private […]

20 Jun 19
Hadena James

As I was working on the second Nephilim Narrative, I was listening to book 2 of the Tommy & Tuppence Series by Agatha Christie. And I was enjoying it, but I also realized why there were 30+ Hercule Poirot novels. For those that don’t read a lot of Agatha Christie, she wrote 4 different series: […]