Crumpler

17 Jul 19
Wyo4News

Results from Performance #6, Wednesday 7/17/19 Performance #7, Wednesday, 7/17, 7:00 p.m., Sweetwater Events Complex Barrel Racing Performance 6 Wednesday 9:00 AM 1. (MT) Shai McDonald, Gardiner, Mont., 17.466 2. (AR) Shelbi Rice, Natural Dam, Ark., 17.548 3. (ND) Trista Hovde, Sidney, Mont., 17.563 4. (UT) Hayden Madsen, Honeyville, Utah, 17.713 5. (UT) Kamryn Carlsen, […]

16 Jul 19
Wyo4News

Results from Performance #3, Monday 7/15/19 Performance #4, Tuesday, 7/16/19 9:00 a.m., Sweetwater Events Complex Barrel Racing Performance 3 Monday 7:00 PM 1. (SD) Shaw Nelson, Hartford, S.D., 17.232 2. (SK) Brooke Lang, Cadillac, Saskatchewan, Can., 17.499 3. (BC) Taya Hamming, Falkland, British Columbia, Can., 17.551 4. (FL) Lacey Nail, Okeechobee, Fla., 17.633 5. (CO) […]

15 Jul 19
Gunner Q

It’s a Tradcon mistake to offer advice to one’s enemies, unless one does it to twist their petards upon their own rhetoric. For this lazy Monday, I twist the Pentagon’s petards with honest talk about how they can best staff their cybersecurity department. TL;DR hire the people you’re supposed to protect. Tech vanguard is dodging […]

12 Jul 19
News Directory

During the past week, a high-profile dispute over public art at a high school after an explosion on the national stage, after the San Francisco School Board voted unanimously to eradicate a cycle of New Road era murals. George Washington's life. The transfer of protests by students and parents continued to contain images in the […]

10 Jul 19
Daily Republic

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon’s cybersecurity mission is facing a classic supply and demand problem: There’s a nationwide shortage of tech talent and an oversupply of jobs. This leaves the Pentagon starved of the cyber-sentries needed to defend its digital networks as the nation’s top computer scientists and software engineers often choose careers in the private […]

10 Jul 19
Archy news nety

In the past week, a simmering dispute over public art appeared on the national stage at a high school, after the San Francisco School Board unanimously decided to launch a cycle of New Deal murals, called the The life of George Washington. The movement followed protests from students and parents that racist images in the […]

10 Jul 19
Daily Republic

WASHINGTON _ The Pentagon’s cybersecurity mission is facing a classic supply and demand problem: There’s a nationwide shortage of tech talent and an oversupply of jobs. This leaves the Pentagon starved of the cyber-sentries needed to defend its digital networks as the nation’s top computer scientists and software engineers often choose careers in the private […]

10 Jul 19
Being Online

I bought a ‘Crumpler Barney Rustle Blanket Messenger Bag‘ way back when I worked in government. Somehow it ended up in storage, unused. Thankfully it stayed dry, so it is in A1 condition. I don’t need it where I live now, it is surplus to needs. It could be yours now. Check out the sales […]

09 Jul 19
Renegades Nation

When the F.F.L. became a keeper league in 2004, the ten charter teams took part in an initial 18-round draft to populate their rosters. Each team had to pick three quarterbacks, four running backs, five wide receivers, and two each of tight ends, kickers, and team defenses in the draft, which followed a snake format. […]

09 Jul 19
Thrive Global
African American Women Trailblazers African American women have accomplished a great deal in this country. Although they are often overlooked, the contributions of African American Women are undeniable. Here is an overview of 5 African American women who are trailblazers:  Katherine Johnson: Mathematician. Born in 1918 in White Sulphur Springs West Virginia, Johnson rose to prominence as one of the premier mathematicians at NASA. Katherine Johnson received her undergraduate degree in Mathematics and French in 1937 from West Virginia State College. She went on to teach public school in Virginia and eventually was hired by NASA in 1953. She worked at NASA for 33 years and was responsible for handling the mathematical computations that allowed John Glenn’s orbital mission in 1962.  Rebecca Lee Crumpler: Medicine. Crumpler was born in 1833 and was among the first African Americans to become a medical doctor. She began her career in medicine as a nurse in the 1850’s while living in Massachusetts. Crumpler then decided to become a physician and pursued her education in Boston at the New England Female Medical College. After becoming a doctor, she traveled south to Richmond, Virginia to provide medical care to freed slaves following the Civil War.  Toni Morrison: Novelist. Born Chloe Ardelia Wofford in 1931, Toni Morrison is one of the most prolific American writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Morrison received her undergraduate degree from Howard University and a Masters degree from Cornell. Her most notable works as a novelist include The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon, and Beloved. In 1988 Beloved won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction.  Oprah Winfrey: Entertainment Mogul. In January of 1954, Oprah Winfrey was born in Rural Mississippi. She also lived in Milwaukee and Tennessee. She graduated from Tennessee State University and quickly found work as a journalist. In 1986 The Oprah Winfrey Show began and over a 25-year period, it became one of the most successful shows in television history. Oprah is the first black woman in the world to become a self-made billionaire.  Loretta Lynch: Lawyer. Loretta Lynch was born in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1959. She received her undergraduate degree and a law degree from Harvard University. After working in corporate law, she also served in the office of the US attorney in Brooklyn, New York. In 2015 she became the first Black woman to serve as Attorney General of the United States.
09 Jul 19
Thrive Global
The blockbuster film about NASA’s human computers, Hidden Figures, made famous the black women scientists Mary Jackson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Katherine Johnson. There are so many other black women scientists who also deserve a spotlight, however. The following are several such.  Mamie Phipps Clark A social psychologist, Mamie was born in 1917 to her physician father and homemaker mother in Arkansas. After receiving various scholarship opportunities, she selected Howard University as her alma mater in 1934. She started out in a math major with a minor in physics. Then she met the man who would become her husband, Kenneth Bancroft Clark, who was a master’s student pursuing psychology. He convinced her to pursue her interests in the development of children by switching to a psychology major. She graduated from Howard University magna cum laude in 1938, continued her schooling to receive her master’s there, also in psychology, and then later got her PhD in 1943 from Columbia University, becoming the first black woman to receive a psychology doctorate there.  Joycelyn Elders, M.D. Born Minnie Lee Jones in Arkansas in 1933 to sharecroppers, she was the oldest of eight children in a three-room cabin that lacked electricity and plumbing. Despite hardships, Minnie graduated valedictorian and went to college in Little Rock, the first of her family to do so. There she changed her name, selecting Minnie Joycelyn Lee, later dropping her first name. She received her B.S. in Biology in 1952 from Philander Smith College. In 1953, after a brief stint as a nurse’s aide, she joined the U.S. Army’s Women’s Medical Specialist Corps. She married Oliver Elders in the year 1960 while in attendance at the University of Arkansas’s Medical School, using the G.I. Bill’s assistance, and received her M.D. in 1960. She went on for her M.S. in Biochemistry in the year 1967. She became the first to receive board certification in the state of Arkansas as a pediatric endocrinologist in 1978. In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed her as the Surgeon General of the United States, the first African American to hold the place. There are so many exceptional black women scientists. In 1864, Rebecca Lee Crumpler was the first African American woman to earn a Doctorate of Medicine in the United States. In 1947, the first African American woman to achieve a PhD in chemistry was Marie Maynard Daly. These and so many more deserve recognition.
08 Jul 19
Hyperallergic

Victor Arnautoff’s “The Life of George Washington” was painted at George Washington High School in 1934 under the Works Progress Administration. Recently, the school board voted unanimously to paint over it, becoming a contentious topic on public art preservation.

05 Jul 19
Katelin Crumpler's Blog

My name is Katelin Crumpler, and I have been asked to share a story about me. I may not have all that interesting of a life, but when I thought about it for a minute, the stories started pouring into my mind. I am twenty-six years old, so I should have more stories than the […]

30 Jun 19
News Directory

Julio Jones, Matt Ryan and Calvin Ridley all love the Atlanta Falcons, but there is one person in particular who should get more of that love than he does. Atlanta Falcons fans were spoiled for most of the last 15 years. Alge Crumpler was in the first place and then after departure, they always went […]

30 Jun 19
Professor O'Connell's Music History Blog: Assignments, Readings, and Random Thoughts on Music and History Both Inside and Outside the Classroom

The San Francisco City School Board recently voted to scrape down a mural (one panel of which is shown above) from a wall of the city’s George Washington High School. The 13-panel mural, which depicts the life of our first president (the school’s namesake), was painted in the 1930s by Victor Arnautoff, a Russian-Jewish immigrant […]