Daily Search Trends

24 May 19
CryptoCenterNews

Mid May Update: Technicals 4H BNBBTC 4H chart depicts a massive bull run of BNB against bitcoin. BNB ranged around 325k and the Fib236 (April high, May low) before moving up to the Fib382 at 355k and hanging around it for a while. It then broke this level and rocketed past the MA200 and Fib50 […]

24 May 19
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24 May 19

Lindsey Bartlett from Weedmaps News Online marketing is a daunting world, made considerably difficult with the limitations imposed on cannabis companies. Many of the largest online marketing services and social media platforms still don’t allow marijuana businesses to advertise. “When it comes to advertising the cannabis industry, options are extremely limited,” said Jared Leighty, Manager […]

24 May 19
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24 May 19
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24 May 19
Business Updates

By The Gold Report Source: Michael Ballanger for Streetwise Reports   05/22/2019 Sector expert Michael Ballanger discusses the demotivating effects of current market trends. With great apology, I am late with this week’s missive largely due to the arrival of boating season and the fierce need to secure a new vehicle, which should have taken (only) […]

24 May 19
RachelsLife

Sooooo it is officially summer and to celebrate I thought I would do a very fun, summery post with a festival wishlist. I am hoping that some of ye are fortunate enough to be attending some festivals this summer, whether it be Life happening this weekend, Indie or EP. I myself am suuupeerr excited to […]

24 May 19
UCSB Education Abroad Program

Written By: Bitota Hearvey Major: Global Studies ACADEMICS What types of classes did you take abroad and how did they compare to UCSB? In choosing my classes I wanted to get a general understanding of the social, economic, and political position of the Caribbean as a region so I took Caribbean International Politics, Caribbean Social […]

24 May 19
Us Weekly
Trends may come and go, but what piece in our closet will always remain the same? A crossbody bag, of course! It’s the timeless accessory we can count on whether we’re running to and from events or looking for a season-to-season staple. [ami-related id=”- Click to search articles -” url=”https://www.usmagazine.com/shop-with-us/news/favorite-leggings-nordstrom-half-yearly-sale-zella-pockets-deal/” title=”Shop With Us: The Leggings Shoppers Rave About Are Now $35 in the Nordstrom Half-Yearly Sale” target=”” inset=”true”] Which crossbody has a fan club of over 1,200 reviewers? No, it’s not an expensive designer brand or fussy bag that might be more trouble than its worth. It’s this affordable crossbody, ideal for everything from weekday commutes to weekend excursions. See it: Grab the Alyssa Triple Zip Pocket Large Crossbody Bag starting at $23, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, May 24th, 2019, but are subject to change. It’s always a losing game when it comes to bags. Finding one that is big enough to hold everything we need and small enough to carry is nearly impossible. The Alyssa Triple Zip Pocket Large Crossbody Bag is slim but has plenty of interior pockets and compartments to store everything we need. It’s also the perfect pop of color everyone needs. With 25 shades to select from, there is quite literally a color for everyone. Whether we’re looking for black, white or another neutral-tone, there are countless options to chose from in the basic family of colors. And in the event those don’t work and we want something less simple? There are bolder and even brighter colors like orange, yellow and even a mint hue to chose from! The colors aren’t the only thing we’re loving here either! We’re swooning over the buttery-leather material it’s crafted from. It’s the soft-to-touch bag everyone will want to touch. We’re confident no one will have any trouble styling this bag, either. When slipping into anything from denim jackets and pants to dreamy dresses, this sleek silhouette will be a seamless addition into any wardrobe. Whether we’re a mother or a single girl in the city, this bag will give our lives the necessary order to make it part of our day-to-day activities. The interior is great when looking to opt out of a wallet and throw our keys, credit cards and iPhones in, plus a little bit extra. See it: Grab the Alyssa Triple Zip Pocket Large Crossbody Bag starting at $23, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, May 24th, 2019, but are subject to change. The spacious interior also has room for makeup, hair brushes, compact mirrors even a snack or two. One reviewer complimented the spacious interior and loved how this was the perfect fit when carrying their entire life in one tiny bag! Another reviewer who identifies as a “self-proclaimed tote lover” was a major fan of this crossbody, too. They loved it so much, they even claimed to have purchased an additional five shades after initially purchasing the taupe. Other reviewers loved how this crossbody added organization into their day-to-day routines with room for all of their daily necessities. Interestingly enough, several reviewers loved how their “excellent purchase” could even fit a 16-ounce bottle of water! Now that’s impressive, even to Us!  Other reviewers loved the “sturdy texture” and “beautiful colors,” with just about every single reviewer loving the adjustable strap. It was great when looking to maintain their on-the-go lifestyle with a hands-free option! Since so many reviewers are raving over how this crossbody was not only “five-star worthy” but an absolute staple in every single closet, at this price, we can’t say no! See it: Grab the Alyssa Triple Zip Pocket Large Crossbody Bag starting at $23, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, May 24th, 2019, but are subject to change. Not your style? Check out more from the Alyssa brand and additional crossbody bags also available at Amazon!   Check out more of our picks and deals here! This post is brought to you by Us Weekly’s Shop With Us team. The Shop With Us team aims to highlight products and services our readers might find interesting and useful. Product and service selection, however, is in no way intended to constitute an endorsement by either Us Weekly or of any celebrity mentioned in the post. The Shop With Us team may receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. In addition, Us Weekly receives compensation from the manufacturer of the products we write about when you click on a link and then purchase the product featured in an article. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product or service is featured or recommended. Shop With Us operates independently from advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback at ShopWithUs@usmagazine.com. Happy shopping!
24 May 19
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24 May 19
Whittier Daily News
By Stan Choe, The Associated Press Did you get a 7% raise last year? Congratulations, yours was in line with what CEOs at the biggest companies got. But for chief executives, that 7% was roughly $800,000. Pay for CEOs at S&P 500 companies rose to a median of $12 million last year, including salary, stock and other compensation, according to data analyzed by Equilar for The Associated Press. The eight-figure packages continue to rise as companies tie more of their CEOs’ pay to their stock prices, which are still near record levels, and as profits hit an all-time high last year due to lower tax bills and a still-growing economy. Pay for typical workers at these companies isn’t rising nearly as quickly. The median increase was 3% last year, less than half the growth for the top bosses. Median means half were larger, and half were smaller. The survey showed that it would take 158 years for the typical worker at most big companies to make what their CEO did in 2018, seven years longer than if both were still at 2017 pay levels. And when top executives are already making so much more than their employees, the bigger percentage raises compound the widening financial gap. Anger about widening income inequality is rising around the world, from Capitol Hill to protests in streets. But it’s only slowly seeping into the conference rooms where boards of directors set the pay for CEOs. Boards are often more concerned with what a competitor may pay to poach their CEO than how much more that person makes versus the rest of the workforce. “It’s a natural thing for a CEO and a board to say, ‘How are others who are doing similar work paid?’ And there’s a natural sense that if the board believes and supports their CEO, they don’t expect their CEO to be paid less than the others in the industry,” said Eric Hosken, a partner at Compensation Advisory Partners, a consulting firm that works with boards. Investors — the ultimate corporate bosses who have the power to vote directors off the board — also continue to vote overwhelmingly in favor of executive pay packages at the biggest companies, though the margins have been decreasing. “There’s a belief that if we underpay our CEO, they can go work in private equity. They can go work for a competitor. They will find places to go,” Hosken said. The AP’s CEO compensation study included pay data for 340 executives at S&P 500 companies who have served at least two full consecutive fiscal years at their companies, which filed proxy statements between Jan. 1 and April 30. Some companies with highly paid CEOs did not fit these criteria and were excluded, such as Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, co-CEOs of Oracle. Each had compensation valued at $108.3 million last fiscal year, but Oracle usually files its proxy statement in September due to its fiscal year ending in May. WHO’S ON TOP Last year’s top paid executive in the survey was David Zaslav of Discovery, the media giant behind HGTV and the Food Network. His total compensation was valued at $129.5 million, up 207% from a year earlier. Like other executives at the top of the rankings, most of Zaslav’s pay is not from cash but from stock awards or option grants that he will fully benefit from only if Discovery’s share price rises in the future. Nearly 80% of Zaslav’s compensation last year came from stock options valued at $102.1 million, most of which he received as part of a new employment contract that runs through 2023. Companies often grant big options packages when top executives renew their contracts. Discovery’s stock returned 11% last year, beating the S&P 500’s loss of 4%, including dividends, and it has also beat the market since its initial public offering in 2008. Media CEOs tend to dominate the top of the rankings for compensation, corralling as much or more in compensation as the stars who work for them. Walt Disney’s CEO Robert Iger was No. 2 on the list, with a compensation package worth $65.6 million, up 81% in a year. His pay vs typical company worker? 1,424 times. One commonly recurring name did not make this year’s list: Leslie Moonves, whose ouster from CBS last year was one of the highest profile results of the #MeToo movement. See the other top paid CEOs here. DISPARITY DEEPENS This is the second year that the government has required companies to show how pay for top bosses compares with the pay for their typical worker. The measure is far from perfect, mostly because companies have a lot of flexibility in how to calculate the numbers. Comparisons between companies can also be meaningless when one has mostly part-time workers in developing countries while the other has office parks full of Ph.D.s in Silicon Valley. But now that companies have submitted two years of data, investors can see how the gap in pay is trending at individual companies. At more than 40% of the companies in this year’s survey, the CEO’s pay rose by at least double the percentage of the median worker’s pay gain. Across the economy, pay is climbing at a faster rate for workers, but the gains are still below where they usually are when the economy is this healthy. Average hourly pay rose 3.4% in February from a year earlier, the largest annual gain in a decade. Companies find that they have to pay more to hold on to staff after the unemployment rate dropped to a nearly 50-year low. But the last time the jobless rate was almost this low, in the late 1990s, hourly pay rose at a 4% to 4.5% rate. Economists say several trends are holding back wage gains, including businesses facing intense pressure from online and overseas competitors. And with larger, multinational companies dominating more industries, workers have fewer alternatives to jump to in search of a raise. “For the kind of numbers we’re seeing on the unemployment rate, or the length of the recovery, all those numbers would tell us that we’re in an incredibly good economy. But it’s not as rosy as those statistics suggest,” said Julia Coronado, an economist and president of MacroPolicy Perspectives. A FEW OUTLIERS In some industries, worker pay is closer to the CEO’s. Some tech CEOs have famously low salaries, such as Lawrence Page of Google’s parent, Alphabet, and Jack Dorsey of Twitter. Both took home a $1 salary last year, but both also own huge stakes of their companies as co-founders. Tech companies also often pay high salaries to lure in programmers and data scientists. At Alphabet, for example, the median employee had compensation of $246,804 last year, up 25% from the year before. High salaries of more than $100,000 are most typically found in a more staid area of the market: utilities. Most of the big utilities paid their median worker above $110,000 last year, but that may not last for long. Compensation fell for the median worker at most utilities last year. Women, meanwhile, still remain relatively rare in the corner offices for S&P 500 companies, even though they enter U.S. companies at roughly the same rate as men. Of the 340 CEOs in this year’s survey, just 19 were women. Their median pay was $12.7 million last year, versus $11.2 million for men. MOST SHAREHOLDERS SIGN OFF ON RAISES For the most part, investors are OK with these big pay packages. Last year, the median company in the survey received a 94% approval rate on its “Say on Pay” vote, where shareholders give a nonbinding up-or-down vote on executive compensation. That was down only slightly from 95% a year earlier. But those high approval numbers belie increasing scrutiny of executive compensation by shareholders. “It’s accelerating a lot,” said Rosanna Landis Weaver, researcher at As You Sow, a shareholder advocacy group. “You have scholarship showing how widening income inequality is bad for everyone, shareholders and democracy. And the myth of ‘pay for performance’ has taken a couple of blows, so people are re-examining pay.” In many cases, the dissenting voices are coming from shareholders outside the United States. “I have the impression that here in the U.S., the culture is still — maybe rightly so — that if your CEO is successful, you are entitled to make basically as much money as you want,” said Luca Paolini, chief strategist at Pictet Asset Management, which is based in Switzerland. “In Europe, we think slightly differently. And in Japan as well. They say, ‘Ok, your company is great, you should give back something.’” Associated Press Economics Writer Chris Rugaber in Washington contributed to this report.
24 May 19
Daily Breeze
By Stan Choe, The Associated Press Did you get a 7% raise last year? Congratulations, yours was in line with what CEOs at the biggest companies got. But for chief executives, that 7% was roughly $800,000. Pay for CEOs at S&P 500 companies rose to a median of $12 million last year, including salary, stock and other compensation, according to data analyzed by Equilar for The Associated Press. The eight-figure packages continue to rise as companies tie more of their CEOs’ pay to their stock prices, which are still near record levels, and as profits hit an all-time high last year due to lower tax bills and a still-growing economy. Pay for typical workers at these companies isn’t rising nearly as quickly. The median increase was 3% last year, less than half the growth for the top bosses. Median means half were larger, and half were smaller. The survey showed that it would take 158 years for the typical worker at most big companies to make what their CEO did in 2018, seven years longer than if both were still at 2017 pay levels. And when top executives are already making so much more than their employees, the bigger percentage raises compound the widening financial gap. Anger about widening income inequality is rising around the world, from Capitol Hill to protests in streets. But it’s only slowly seeping into the conference rooms where boards of directors set the pay for CEOs. Boards are often more concerned with what a competitor may pay to poach their CEO than how much more that person makes versus the rest of the workforce. “It’s a natural thing for a CEO and a board to say, ‘How are others who are doing similar work paid?’ And there’s a natural sense that if the board believes and supports their CEO, they don’t expect their CEO to be paid less than the others in the industry,” said Eric Hosken, a partner at Compensation Advisory Partners, a consulting firm that works with boards. Investors — the ultimate corporate bosses who have the power to vote directors off the board — also continue to vote overwhelmingly in favor of executive pay packages at the biggest companies, though the margins have been decreasing. “There’s a belief that if we underpay our CEO, they can go work in private equity. They can go work for a competitor. They will find places to go,” Hosken said. The AP’s CEO compensation study included pay data for 340 executives at S&P 500 companies who have served at least two full consecutive fiscal years at their companies, which filed proxy statements between Jan. 1 and April 30. Some companies with highly paid CEOs did not fit these criteria and were excluded, such as Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, co-CEOs of Oracle. Each had compensation valued at $108.3 million last fiscal year, but Oracle usually files its proxy statement in September due to its fiscal year ending in May. WHO’S ON TOP Last year’s top paid executive in the survey was David Zaslav of Discovery, the media giant behind HGTV and the Food Network. His total compensation was valued at $129.5 million, up 207% from a year earlier. Like other executives at the top of the rankings, most of Zaslav’s pay is not from cash but from stock awards or option grants that he will fully benefit from only if Discovery’s share price rises in the future. Nearly 80% of Zaslav’s compensation last year came from stock options valued at $102.1 million, most of which he received as part of a new employment contract that runs through 2023. Companies often grant big options packages when top executives renew their contracts. Discovery’s stock returned 11% last year, beating the S&P 500’s loss of 4%, including dividends, and it has also beat the market since its initial public offering in 2008. Media CEOs tend to dominate the top of the rankings for compensation, corralling as much or more in compensation as the stars who work for them. Walt Disney’s CEO Robert Iger was No. 2 on the list, with a compensation package worth $65.6 million, up 81% in a year. His pay vs typical company worker? 1,424 times. One commonly recurring name did not make this year’s list: Leslie Moonves, whose ouster from CBS last year was one of the highest profile results of the #MeToo movement. See the other top paid CEOs here. DISPARITY DEEPENS This is the second year that the government has required companies to show how pay for top bosses compares with the pay for their typical worker. The measure is far from perfect, mostly because companies have a lot of flexibility in how to calculate the numbers. Comparisons between companies can also be meaningless when one has mostly part-time workers in developing countries while the other has office parks full of Ph.D.s in Silicon Valley. But now that companies have submitted two years of data, investors can see how the gap in pay is trending at individual companies. At more than 40% of the companies in this year’s survey, the CEO’s pay rose by at least double the percentage of the median worker’s pay gain. Across the economy, pay is climbing at a faster rate for workers, but the gains are still below where they usually are when the economy is this healthy. Average hourly pay rose 3.4% in February from a year earlier, the largest annual gain in a decade. Companies find that they have to pay more to hold on to staff after the unemployment rate dropped to a nearly 50-year low. But the last time the jobless rate was almost this low, in the late 1990s, hourly pay rose at a 4% to 4.5% rate. Economists say several trends are holding back wage gains, including businesses facing intense pressure from online and overseas competitors. And with larger, multinational companies dominating more industries, workers have fewer alternatives to jump to in search of a raise. “For the kind of numbers we’re seeing on the unemployment rate, or the length of the recovery, all those numbers would tell us that we’re in an incredibly good economy. But it’s not as rosy as those statistics suggest,” said Julia Coronado, an economist and president of MacroPolicy Perspectives. A FEW OUTLIERS In some industries, worker pay is closer to the CEO’s. Some tech CEOs have famously low salaries, such as Lawrence Page of Google’s parent, Alphabet, and Jack Dorsey of Twitter. Both took home a $1 salary last year, but both also own huge stakes of their companies as co-founders. Tech companies also often pay high salaries to lure in programmers and data scientists. At Alphabet, for example, the median employee had compensation of $246,804 last year, up 25% from the year before. High salaries of more than $100,000 are most typically found in a more staid area of the market: utilities. Most of the big utilities paid their median worker above $110,000 last year, but that may not last for long. Compensation fell for the median worker at most utilities last year. Women, meanwhile, still remain relatively rare in the corner offices for S&P 500 companies, even though they enter U.S. companies at roughly the same rate as men. Of the 340 CEOs in this year’s survey, just 19 were women. Their median pay was $12.7 million last year, versus $11.2 million for men. MOST SHAREHOLDERS SIGN OFF ON RAISES For the most part, investors are OK with these big pay packages. Last year, the median company in the survey received a 94% approval rate on its “Say on Pay” vote, where shareholders give a nonbinding up-or-down vote on executive compensation. That was down only slightly from 95% a year earlier. But those high approval numbers belie increasing scrutiny of executive compensation by shareholders. “It’s accelerating a lot,” said Rosanna Landis Weaver, researcher at As You Sow, a shareholder advocacy group. “You have scholarship showing how widening income inequality is bad for everyone, shareholders and democracy. And the myth of ‘pay for performance’ has taken a couple of blows, so people are re-examining pay.” In many cases, the dissenting voices are coming from shareholders outside the United States. “I have the impression that here in the U.S., the culture is still — maybe rightly so — that if your CEO is successful, you are entitled to make basically as much money as you want,” said Luca Paolini, chief strategist at Pictet Asset Management, which is based in Switzerland. “In Europe, we think slightly differently. And in Japan as well. They say, ‘Ok, your company is great, you should give back something.’” Associated Press Economics Writer Chris Rugaber in Washington contributed to this report.
24 May 19
Daily News
By Stan Choe, The Associated Press Did you get a 7% raise last year? Congratulations, yours was in line with what CEOs at the biggest companies got. But for chief executives, that 7% was roughly $800,000. Pay for CEOs at S&P 500 companies rose to a median of $12 million last year, including salary, stock and other compensation, according to data analyzed by Equilar for The Associated Press. The eight-figure packages continue to rise as companies tie more of their CEOs’ pay to their stock prices, which are still near record levels, and as profits hit an all-time high last year due to lower tax bills and a still-growing economy. Pay for typical workers at these companies isn’t rising nearly as quickly. The median increase was 3% last year, less than half the growth for the top bosses. Median means half were larger, and half were smaller. The survey showed that it would take 158 years for the typical worker at most big companies to make what their CEO did in 2018, seven years longer than if both were still at 2017 pay levels. And when top executives are already making so much more than their employees, the bigger percentage raises compound the widening financial gap. Anger about widening income inequality is rising around the world, from Capitol Hill to protests in streets. But it’s only slowly seeping into the conference rooms where boards of directors set the pay for CEOs. Boards are often more concerned with what a competitor may pay to poach their CEO than how much more that person makes versus the rest of the workforce. “It’s a natural thing for a CEO and a board to say, ‘How are others who are doing similar work paid?’ And there’s a natural sense that if the board believes and supports their CEO, they don’t expect their CEO to be paid less than the others in the industry,” said Eric Hosken, a partner at Compensation Advisory Partners, a consulting firm that works with boards. Investors — the ultimate corporate bosses who have the power to vote directors off the board — also continue to vote overwhelmingly in favor of executive pay packages at the biggest companies, though the margins have been decreasing. “There’s a belief that if we underpay our CEO, they can go work in private equity. They can go work for a competitor. They will find places to go,” Hosken said. The AP’s CEO compensation study included pay data for 340 executives at S&P 500 companies who have served at least two full consecutive fiscal years at their companies, which filed proxy statements between Jan. 1 and April 30. Some companies with highly paid CEOs did not fit these criteria and were excluded, such as Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, co-CEOs of Oracle. Each had compensation valued at $108.3 million last fiscal year, but Oracle usually files its proxy statement in September due to its fiscal year ending in May. WHO’S ON TOP Last year’s top paid executive in the survey was David Zaslav of Discovery, the media giant behind HGTV and the Food Network. His total compensation was valued at $129.5 million, up 207% from a year earlier. Like other executives at the top of the rankings, most of Zaslav’s pay is not from cash but from stock awards or option grants that he will fully benefit from only if Discovery’s share price rises in the future. Nearly 80% of Zaslav’s compensation last year came from stock options valued at $102.1 million, most of which he received as part of a new employment contract that runs through 2023. Companies often grant big options packages when top executives renew their contracts. Discovery’s stock returned 11% last year, beating the S&P 500’s loss of 4%, including dividends, and it has also beat the market since its initial public offering in 2008. Media CEOs tend to dominate the top of the rankings for compensation, corralling as much or more in compensation as the stars who work for them. Walt Disney’s CEO Robert Iger was No. 2 on the list, with a compensation package worth $65.6 million, up 81% in a year. His pay vs typical company worker? 1,424 times. One commonly recurring name did not make this year’s list: Leslie Moonves, whose ouster from CBS last year was one of the highest profile results of the #MeToo movement. See the other top paid CEOs here. DISPARITY DEEPENS This is the second year that the government has required companies to show how pay for top bosses compares with the pay for their typical worker. The measure is far from perfect, mostly because companies have a lot of flexibility in how to calculate the numbers. Comparisons between companies can also be meaningless when one has mostly part-time workers in developing countries while the other has office parks full of Ph.D.s in Silicon Valley. But now that companies have submitted two years of data, investors can see how the gap in pay is trending at individual companies. At more than 40% of the companies in this year’s survey, the CEO’s pay rose by at least double the percentage of the median worker’s pay gain. Across the economy, pay is climbing at a faster rate for workers, but the gains are still below where they usually are when the economy is this healthy. Average hourly pay rose 3.4% in February from a year earlier, the largest annual gain in a decade. Companies find that they have to pay more to hold on to staff after the unemployment rate dropped to a nearly 50-year low. But the last time the jobless rate was almost this low, in the late 1990s, hourly pay rose at a 4% to 4.5% rate. Economists say several trends are holding back wage gains, including businesses facing intense pressure from online and overseas competitors. And with larger, multinational companies dominating more industries, workers have fewer alternatives to jump to in search of a raise. “For the kind of numbers we’re seeing on the unemployment rate, or the length of the recovery, all those numbers would tell us that we’re in an incredibly good economy. But it’s not as rosy as those statistics suggest,” said Julia Coronado, an economist and president of MacroPolicy Perspectives. A FEW OUTLIERS In some industries, worker pay is closer to the CEO’s. Some tech CEOs have famously low salaries, such as Lawrence Page of Google’s parent, Alphabet, and Jack Dorsey of Twitter. Both took home a $1 salary last year, but both also own huge stakes of their companies as co-founders. Tech companies also often pay high salaries to lure in programmers and data scientists. At Alphabet, for example, the median employee had compensation of $246,804 last year, up 25% from the year before. High salaries of more than $100,000 are most typically found in a more staid area of the market: utilities. Most of the big utilities paid their median worker above $110,000 last year, but that may not last for long. Compensation fell for the median worker at most utilities last year. Women, meanwhile, still remain relatively rare in the corner offices for S&P 500 companies, even though they enter U.S. companies at roughly the same rate as men. Of the 340 CEOs in this year’s survey, just 19 were women. Their median pay was $12.7 million last year, versus $11.2 million for men. MOST SHAREHOLDERS SIGN OFF ON RAISES For the most part, investors are OK with these big pay packages. Last year, the median company in the survey received a 94% approval rate on its “Say on Pay” vote, where shareholders give a nonbinding up-or-down vote on executive compensation. That was down only slightly from 95% a year earlier. But those high approval numbers belie increasing scrutiny of executive compensation by shareholders. “It’s accelerating a lot,” said Rosanna Landis Weaver, researcher at As You Sow, a shareholder advocacy group. “You have scholarship showing how widening income inequality is bad for everyone, shareholders and democracy. And the myth of ‘pay for performance’ has taken a couple of blows, so people are re-examining pay.” In many cases, the dissenting voices are coming from shareholders outside the United States. “I have the impression that here in the U.S., the culture is still — maybe rightly so — that if your CEO is successful, you are entitled to make basically as much money as you want,” said Luca Paolini, chief strategist at Pictet Asset Management, which is based in Switzerland. “In Europe, we think slightly differently. And in Japan as well. They say, ‘Ok, your company is great, you should give back something.’” Associated Press Economics Writer Chris Rugaber in Washington contributed to this report.