Dan Wootton

23 Mar 19
The Scottish Sun
TICKETS for the first US Major League Baseball game in Britain are selling faster than those for Spice Girls reunion gigs. There is more demand to see New York Yankees play Boston Red Sox than Geri Halliwell and pals. Tickets for the US Major League American Baseball game in the UK are selling faster than those for the Spice Girls reunion gig in June Baseball fans from 28 countries have paid £100 to £1,000-plus to get into the 60,000-seat London Stadium in East London in June. Tickets for the Spice Girls’ Wembley gigs that month start at £92. StubHub UK said the baseball game was more popular than top music gigs. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN UK NEWS” posts_category=”141″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] A spokesman said: “”The Major League Baseball (MLB) game between the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox has seen higher demand for tickets than almost every other event in 2019. It’s harder to get tickets than for acts including Pink, Drake, Fleetwood Mac and Ariana Grande.” He said demand to see other US sports such as basketball and American football was also rising. [bc_video video_id=”6008943222001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Emma Bunton talks to Dan Wootton about how Victoria Beckham could still return to the Spice Girls “] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
23 Mar 19
The Sun
TICKETS for the first US Major League Baseball game in Britain are selling faster than those for Spice Girls reunion gigs. There is more demand to see New York Yankees play Boston Red Sox than Geri Halliwell and pals. Tickets for the US Major League American Baseball game in the UK are selling faster than those for the Spice Girls reunion gig in June Baseball fans from 28 countries have paid £100 to £1,000-plus to get into the 60,000-seat London Stadium in East London in June. Tickets for the Spice Girls’ Wembley gigs that month start at £92. StubHub UK said the baseball game was more popular than top music gigs. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN UK NEWS” posts_category=”327″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] A spokesman said: “”The Major League Baseball (MLB) game between the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox has seen higher demand for tickets than almost every other event in 2019. It’s harder to get tickets than for acts including Pink, Drake, Fleetwood Mac and Ariana Grande.” He said demand to see other US sports such as basketball and American football was also rising. [bc_video video_id=”6008943222001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Emma Bunton talks to Dan Wootton about how Victoria Beckham could still return to the Spice Girls “] GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
22 Mar 19
The Sun
I WAS sitting at home on my own, disbelieving and despondent, on Saturday having been told the terrible news that Mike Thalassitis had taken his own life. In recent months, as the Love Island star started to cope with life outside the villa, I had become pals with the man who was nicknamed Muggy on the ITV2 reality series. Mike Thalassitis had become pals with The Sun’s Dan Wootton Given his portrayal as a blokey lothario on the telly, I didn’t think we’d ever get on. But his quick wit and ­vulnerable ­personality cut through as we first connected on social media and an unlikely bond was formed. I’d last chatted with him just two days before he died and, despite the death of his beloved gran, he assured me he was fine. He was looking forward to the opening of his Essex ­restaurant and speaking to me in some detail about the choice of decor and food. On television Mike had always come across as confident So how could this have ­happened? Like so many ­suicides, it seemed almost impossible and totally ­senseless. But more because this was Mike we were talking about — the man with everything, on the surface at least. Looks. Sporting talent. A long line of women who were desperate to be with him. A lovely family. Mike left behind a fantastic family Like many others, I needed to say something, so I took to social media to share my ­feelings. There are so many downsides to this new form of communication — as we saw last week with the devastating New Zealand terrorist attack streamed live on Facebook — but on this dark night it filled me with hope. One of the many devastated, thoughtful and helpful replies and messages I received was from Sheridan Smith. “This should be a massive wake up call,” she wrote. “I feel sick. Reach out, sometimes to the most confident friend. We can only learn and try to change.” Sheridan Smith has urged all who are suffering to reach out This sparked a conversation that I could tell so many ­others needed that night — ­millions of Love Island fans felt they knew Mike. Sheridan summed up my feelings by adding: “Wish we could stop this but each person has their own sadness, but why is it the ones we think are strong? “We should teach and do anything we can, impossible as it seems. I feel so sick, Dan — we can surely do something to help. “That’s two suicides with one reality show. We have to help somehow.” Mike is the second Love Island star to end his own life I knew she was right. So many stories were flowing in. So much honesty. So much pain. Mike had already sparked something positive — the ­opening of a nationwide debate about the mental health of young men, and the damage reality TV and social media can cause. Just 24 hours later, The Sun partnered with the excellent and important charity Papyrus to launch our Let’s Talk ­campaign, which was quickly backed by the suicide prevention minister. The response was overwhelming. I was touched by the stories our readers shared with me publicly and privately all week, convincing me that this is a conversation so ­desperately needed. Of course, as always, there is a power in celebrities bravely recounting their own battles. Former X Factor winner Matt Terry told how his mental health issues had got so bad after the show that his mum slept in his bedroom. Thank you, Matt. Matt Terry has been discussing his own battles A girl band member reached out to me on Instagram and told me how she attempted to take her own life last year. But now she’s finding hope. Top TV presenter Matt Johnson wrote so powerfully about his own descent into darkness and why there is light at the end of the tunnel. Of course, this is an issue close to The Sun’s heart. TV host Matt Johnson says he has had his own struggles Last year we ran the You’re Not Alone campaign, designed to help people with mental illness. That campaign ­continues to run on The Sun Online today. I applaud ITV for tackling the issue head on and ­unveiling new health processes for Love Island — but what I’ve learned over the years is that suicide is no one’s fault. [bc_video video_id=”6015288873001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Dr Alex George says Love Island does provide help for its contestants in discussion about death of Mike Thalassitis”] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN CELEBRITY” posts_category=”332″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] Mike adored his time on that show. Contrary to popular belief, he even loved being referred to by his nickname Muggy. He told me so many times. I just wish he could have seen the heartfelt reaction to his life this week — tragically, he had no idea how much he meant to so many. [boxout headline=”How to get help” intro=”If YOU are struggling, or you are worried about someone, you can find confidential advice from mental health professionals at Papyrus. “] Call the Papyrus HopeLine UK on 0800 068 4141 or email pat@papyrus-uk.org. [/boxout] Love Island’s Alex Miller reveals he nearly took his own life LOVE Island star Alex Miller has revealed that he was close to taking his own life after appearing on the ITV2 show last year – but he was saved by one of the producers. Alex, 28, spoke out following Mike Thalassitis tragic death on Saturday, with the 2017 Love Island contestant taking his own life in a woodland near his home at the age of 26. Alex was close to taking his own life after Love Island Essex boy Alex got kicked out of the villa after Megan Barton-Hanson chose Wes Nelson over him during a recoupling, and he has now revealed that he suffered from depression once the show ended. Speaking on Access All Areas with Lizzie Cundy and Stephen Leng, the reality star shared: “I did go through a dark patch where I would look at bridges and think ‘Yeah, I could drive into that’. “I was in a dark place [after the show]. It was winter time, there was a lot of factors coming up, knowing that everything was sort of coming to an end like getting back into the old routine in the job.” Alex said that he struggled to return to his regular job, adding: “Everything has died a death, you’ve fallen off the cliff of reality fame. It’s not what it is cracked up to be.” The hunk was dumped by blonde beauty Megan Thankfully, one of Love Island’s producers saw a worrying rant that Alex had posted to his Instagram page and got in touch. The reality star continued: “I had a little rant on Instagram. I went through a bit of a dark patch and luckily one of the producers follow me on Instagram saw the rant got in touch with me and put me back in touch with a psychiatrist. “Looking back, all I needed to do was be forward and go talk to them.” Alex said that the therapy helped him get through the dark days and he is now trying to move on with his life. Alex opened up on Access All Areas earlier today The hunk went on to defend the show’s producers, who have come under scrutiny following Mike and fellow Love Island alumni Sophie Gradon’s shock deaths, with ex-contestants insisting that bosses need to provide more after care. But Alex disagrees, sharing: “They can’t be pro-active all the time and keep chasing and keep chasing. “There are so many contestants, it’s impossible for them to do.” [bc_video video_id=”6014787845001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=” Love Island star Mike Thalassitis found dead aged 26″] [article-rail-section title=”Most Read In TV & Showbiz” posts_category=”325″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Alex’s comments come as Love Island bosses sent a letter to The Sun detailing new safeguards for their stars. It said that therapy will be offered to “all Islanders and not only those that reach out to us”. They will also provide social media training and financial management advice. [bc_video video_id=”6016649089001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Love Island’s Alex Miller reveals he nearly took his own life after the show but was saved by a producer”] [boxout headline=”What I’ve learned”] BBC News luvvies are not as smart as they like to think.At the Ultimate News Quiz this week, the Lorraine show team – featuring ­fashionista Mark Heyes, The Chase’s Anne Hegerty and my good self – managed to thrash BBC Radio 4 (with Nick Robinson and Rory Bremner) and Newsnight, as well as the likes of Channel 4 News (featuring Jon Snow) and Sky News.Congratulations to my Good Morning Britain colleagues, who triumphed for the second year even without the help of their great leader Piers Morgan  SOMETIMES a sequel of a classic film is better never made. The now-abandoned Forrest Gump 2, it emerges, would have featured Tom Hanks’ iconic ­character riding the ­freeway with O J Simpson, dancing with Princess Diana and ­witnessing the Oklahoma City ­Bombing.Potentially brilliant? Yes. But much more likely catastrophically bad. Grease is my favourite movie of all time but, I promise you, I have never watched the much-maligned sequel.Sometimes it’s worth accepting you can’t improve perfection, no matter how much money might be made. AMERICA’s most famous women can’t resist a British bloke. How else to explain the unlikely ­courting going on between Brits host Jack Whitehall and ­legendary US socialite Paris Hilton?After romances with Kate Beckinsale and Gemma Chan, it’s proof that a wicked sense of humour means far more than a bulging bicep. [/boxout] Wootton’s Week GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
22 Mar 19
The Scottish Sun
I WAS sitting at home on my own, disbelieving and despondent, on Saturday having been told the terrible news that Mike Thalassitis had taken his own life. In recent months, as the Love Island star started to cope with life outside the villa, I had become pals with the man who was nicknamed Muggy on the ITV2 reality series. Mike Thalassitis had become pals with The Sun’s Dan Wootton Given his portrayal as a blokey lothario on the telly, I didn’t think we’d ever get on. But his quick wit and ­vulnerable ­personality cut through as we first connected on social media and an unlikely bond was formed. I’d last chatted with him just two days before he died and, despite the death of his beloved gran, he assured me he was fine. He was looking forward to the opening of his Essex ­restaurant and speaking to me in some detail about the choice of decor and food. On television Mike had always come across as confident So how could this have ­happened? Like so many ­suicides, it seemed almost impossible and totally ­senseless. But more because this was Mike we were talking about — the man with everything, on the surface at least. Looks. Sporting talent. A long line of women who were desperate to be with him. A lovely family. Mike left behind a fantastic family Like many others, I needed to say something, so I took to social media to share my ­feelings. There are so many downsides to this new form of communication — as we saw last week with the devastating New Zealand terrorist attack streamed live on Facebook — but on this dark night it filled me with hope. One of the many devastated, thoughtful and helpful replies and messages I received was from Sheridan Smith. “This should be a massive wake up call,” she wrote. “I feel sick. Reach out, sometimes to the most confident friend. We can only learn and try to change.” Sheridan Smith has urged all who are suffering to reach out This sparked a conversation that I could tell so many ­others needed that night — ­millions of Love Island fans felt they knew Mike. Sheridan summed up my feelings by adding: “Wish we could stop this but each person has their own sadness, but why is it the ones we think are strong? “We should teach and do anything we can, impossible as it seems. I feel so sick, Dan — we can surely do something to help. “That’s two suicides with one reality show. We have to help somehow.” Mike is the second Love Island star to end his own life I knew she was right. So many stories were flowing in. So much honesty. So much pain. Mike had already sparked something positive — the ­opening of a nationwide debate about the mental health of young men, and the damage reality TV and social media can cause. Just 24 hours later, The Sun partnered with the excellent and important charity Papyrus to launch our Let’s Talk ­campaign, which was quickly backed by the suicide prevention minister. The response was overwhelming. I was touched by the stories our readers shared with me publicly and privately all week, convincing me that this is a conversation so ­desperately needed. Of course, as always, there is a power in celebrities bravely recounting their own battles. Former X Factor winner Matt Terry told how his mental health issues had got so bad after the show that his mum slept in his bedroom. Thank you, Matt. Matt Terry has been discussing his own battles A girl band member reached out to me on Instagram and told me how she attempted to take her own life last year. But now she’s finding hope. Top TV presenter Matt Johnson wrote so powerfully about his own descent into darkness and why there is light at the end of the tunnel. Of course, this is an issue close to The Sun’s heart. TV host Matt Johnson says he has had his own struggles Last year we ran the You’re Not Alone campaign, designed to help people with mental illness. That campaign ­continues to run on The Sun Online today. I applaud ITV for tackling the issue head on and ­unveiling new health processes for Love Island — but what I’ve learned over the years is that suicide is no one’s fault. [bc_video video_id=”6015288873001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Dr Alex George says Love Island does provide help for its contestants in discussion about death of Mike Thalassitis”] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN CELEBRITY” posts_category=”122″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] Mike adored his time on that show. Contrary to popular belief, he even loved being referred to by his nickname Muggy. He told me so many times. I just wish he could have seen the heartfelt reaction to his life this week — tragically, he had no idea how much he meant to so many. [boxout headline=”How to get help” intro=”If YOU are struggling, or you are worried about someone, you can find confidential advice from mental health professionals at Papyrus. “] Call the Papyrus HopeLine UK on 0800 068 4141 or email pat@papyrus-uk.org. [/boxout] Love Island’s Alex Miller reveals he nearly took his own life LOVE Island star Alex Miller has revealed that he was close to taking his own life after appearing on the ITV2 show last year – but he was saved by one of the producers. Alex, 28, spoke out following Mike Thalassitis tragic death on Saturday, with the 2017 Love Island contestant taking his own life in a woodland near his home at the age of 26. Alex was close to taking his own life after Love Island Essex boy Alex got kicked out of the villa after Megan Barton-Hanson chose Wes Nelson over him during a recoupling, and he has now revealed that he suffered from depression once the show ended. Speaking on Access All Areas with Lizzie Cundy and Stephen Leng, the reality star shared: “I did go through a dark patch where I would look at bridges and think ‘Yeah, I could drive into that’. “I was in a dark place [after the show]. It was winter time, there was a lot of factors coming up, knowing that everything was sort of coming to an end like getting back into the old routine in the job.” Alex said that he struggled to return to his regular job, adding: “Everything has died a death, you’ve fallen off the cliff of reality fame. It’s not what it is cracked up to be.” The hunk was dumped by blonde beauty Megan Thankfully, one of Love Island’s producers saw a worrying rant that Alex had posted to his Instagram page and got in touch. The reality star continued: “I had a little rant on Instagram. I went through a bit of a dark patch and luckily one of the producers follow me on Instagram saw the rant got in touch with me and put me back in touch with a psychiatrist. “Looking back, all I needed to do was be forward and go talk to them.” Alex said that the therapy helped him get through the dark days and he is now trying to move on with his life. Alex opened up on Access All Areas earlier today The hunk went on to defend the show’s producers, who have come under scrutiny following Mike and fellow Love Island alumni Sophie Gradon’s shock deaths, with ex-contestants insisting that bosses need to provide more after care. But Alex disagrees, sharing: “They can’t be pro-active all the time and keep chasing and keep chasing. “There are so many contestants, it’s impossible for them to do.” [bc_video video_id=”6014787845001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=” Love Island star Mike Thalassitis found dead aged 26″] [article-rail-section title=”Most Read In TV & Showbiz” posts_category=”6″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Alex’s comments come as Love Island bosses sent a letter to The Sun detailing new safeguards for their stars. It said that therapy will be offered to “all Islanders and not only those that reach out to us”. They will also provide social media training and financial management advice. [bc_video video_id=”6016649089001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Love Island’s Alex Miller reveals he nearly took his own life after the show but was saved by a producer”] [boxout headline=”What I’ve learned”] BBC News luvvies are not as smart as they like to think.At the Ultimate News Quiz this week, the Lorraine show team – featuring ­fashionista Mark Heyes, The Chase’s Anne Hegerty and my good self – managed to thrash BBC Radio 4 (with Nick Robinson and Rory Bremner) and Newsnight, as well as the likes of Channel 4 News (featuring Jon Snow) and Sky News.Congratulations to my Good Morning Britain colleagues, who triumphed for the second year even without the help of their great leader Piers Morgan  SOMETIMES a sequel of a classic film is better never made. The now-abandoned Forrest Gump 2, it emerges, would have featured Tom Hanks’ iconic ­character riding the ­freeway with O J Simpson, dancing with Princess Diana and ­witnessing the Oklahoma City ­Bombing.Potentially brilliant? Yes. But much more likely catastrophically bad. Grease is my favourite movie of all time but, I promise you, I have never watched the much-maligned sequel.Sometimes it’s worth accepting you can’t improve perfection, no matter how much money might be made. AMERICA’s most famous women can’t resist a British bloke. How else to explain the unlikely ­courting going on between Brits host Jack Whitehall and ­legendary US socialite Paris Hilton?After romances with Kate Beckinsale and Gemma Chan, it’s proof that a wicked sense of humour means far more than a bulging bicep. [/boxout] Wootton’s Week GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
22 Mar 19
The Irish Sun
I WAS sitting at home on my own, disbelieving and despondent, on Saturday having been told the terrible news that Mike Thalassitis had taken his own life. In recent months, as the Love Island star started to cope with life outside the villa, I had become pals with the man who was nicknamed Muggy on the ITV2 reality series. Mike Thalassitis had become pals with The Sun’s Dan Wootton Given his portrayal as a blokey lothario on the telly, I didn’t think we’d ever get on. But his quick wit and ­vulnerable ­personality cut through as we first connected on social media and an unlikely bond was formed. I’d last chatted with him just two days before he died and, despite the death of his beloved gran, he assured me he was fine. He was looking forward to the opening of his Essex ­restaurant and speaking to me in some detail about the choice of decor and food. On television Mike had always come across as confident So how could this have ­happened? Like so many ­suicides, it seemed almost impossible and totally ­senseless. But more because this was Mike we were talking about — the man with everything, on the surface at least. Looks. Sporting talent. A long line of women who were desperate to be with him. A lovely family. Mike left behind a fantastic family Like many others, I needed to say something, so I took to social media to share my ­feelings. There are so many downsides to this new form of communication — as we saw last week with the devastating New Zealand terrorist attack streamed live on Facebook — but on this dark night it filled me with hope. One of the many devastated, thoughtful and helpful replies and messages I received was from Sheridan Smith. “This should be a massive wake up call,” she wrote. “I feel sick. Reach out, sometimes to the most confident friend. We can only learn and try to change.” Sheridan Smith has urged all who are suffering to reach out This sparked a conversation that I could tell so many ­others needed that night — ­millions of Love Island fans felt they knew Mike. Sheridan summed up my feelings by adding: “Wish we could stop this but each person has their own sadness, but why is it the ones we think are strong? “We should teach and do anything we can, impossible as it seems. I feel so sick, Dan — we can surely do something to help. “That’s two suicides with one reality show. We have to help somehow.” Mike is the second Love Island star to end his own life I knew she was right. So many stories were flowing in. So much honesty. So much pain. Mike had already sparked something positive — the ­opening of a nationwide debate about the mental health of young men, and the damage reality TV and social media can cause. Just 24 hours later, The Sun partnered with the excellent and important charity Papyrus to launch our Let’s Talk ­campaign, which was quickly backed by the suicide prevention minister. The response was overwhelming. I was touched by the stories our readers shared with me publicly and privately all week, convincing me that this is a conversation so ­desperately needed. Of course, as always, there is a power in celebrities bravely recounting their own battles. Former X Factor winner Matt Terry told how his mental health issues had got so bad after the show that his mum slept in his bedroom. Thank you, Matt. Matt Terry has been discussing his own battles A girl band member reached out to me on Instagram and told me how she attempted to take her own life last year. But now she’s finding hope. Top TV presenter Matt Johnson wrote so powerfully about his own descent into darkness and why there is light at the end of the tunnel. Of course, this is an issue close to The Sun’s heart. TV host Matt Johnson says he has had his own struggles Last year we ran the You’re Not Alone campaign, designed to help people with mental illness. That campaign ­continues to run on The Sun Online today. I applaud ITV for tackling the issue head on and ­unveiling new health processes for Love Island — but what I’ve learned over the years is that suicide is no one’s fault. [bc_video video_id=”6015288873001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Dr Alex George says Love Island does provide help for its contestants in discussion about death of Mike Thalassitis”] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN CELEBRITY” posts_category=”170″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] Mike adored his time on that show. Contrary to popular belief, he even loved being referred to by his nickname Muggy. He told me so many times. I just wish he could have seen the heartfelt reaction to his life this week — tragically, he had no idea how much he meant to so many. [boxout headline=”How to get help” intro=”If YOU are struggling, or you are worried about someone, you can find confidential advice from mental health professionals at Papyrus. “] Call the Papyrus HopeLine UK on 0800 068 4141 or email pat@papyrus-uk.org. [/boxout] Love Island’s Alex Miller reveals he nearly took his own life LOVE Island star Alex Miller has revealed that he was close to taking his own life after appearing on the ITV2 show last year – but he was saved by one of the producers. Alex, 28, spoke out following Mike Thalassitis tragic death on Saturday, with the 2017 Love Island contestant taking his own life in a woodland near his home at the age of 26. Alex was close to taking his own life after Love Island Essex boy Alex got kicked out of the villa after Megan Barton-Hanson chose Wes Nelson over him during a recoupling, and he has now revealed that he suffered from depression once the show ended. Speaking on Access All Areas with Lizzie Cundy and Stephen Leng, the reality star shared: “I did go through a dark patch where I would look at bridges and think ‘Yeah, I could drive into that’. “I was in a dark place [after the show]. It was winter time, there was a lot of factors coming up, knowing that everything was sort of coming to an end like getting back into the old routine in the job.” Alex said that he struggled to return to his regular job, adding: “Everything has died a death, you’ve fallen off the cliff of reality fame. It’s not what it is cracked up to be.” The hunk was dumped by blonde beauty Megan Thankfully, one of Love Island’s producers saw a worrying rant that Alex had posted to his Instagram page and got in touch. The reality star continued: “I had a little rant on Instagram. I went through a bit of a dark patch and luckily one of the producers follow me on Instagram saw the rant got in touch with me and put me back in touch with a psychiatrist. “Looking back, all I needed to do was be forward and go talk to them.” Alex said that the therapy helped him get through the dark days and he is now trying to move on with his life. Alex opened up on Access All Areas earlier today The hunk went on to defend the show’s producers, who have come under scrutiny following Mike and fellow Love Island alumni Sophie Gradon’s shock deaths, with ex-contestants insisting that bosses need to provide more after care. But Alex disagrees, sharing: “They can’t be pro-active all the time and keep chasing and keep chasing. “There are so many contestants, it’s impossible for them to do.” [bc_video video_id=”6014787845001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=” Love Island star Mike Thalassitis found dead aged 26″] [article-rail-section title=”Most Read In TV & Showbiz” posts_category=”169″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Alex’s comments come as Love Island bosses sent a letter to The Sun detailing new safeguards for their stars. It said that therapy will be offered to “all Islanders and not only those that reach out to us”. They will also provide social media training and financial management advice. [bc_video video_id=”6016649089001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Love Island’s Alex Miller reveals he nearly took his own life after the show but was saved by a producer”] [boxout headline=”What I’ve learned”] BBC News luvvies are not as smart as they like to think.At the Ultimate News Quiz this week, the Lorraine show team – featuring ­fashionista Mark Heyes, The Chase’s Anne Hegerty and my good self – managed to thrash BBC Radio 4 (with Nick Robinson and Rory Bremner) and Newsnight, as well as the likes of Channel 4 News (featuring Jon Snow) and Sky News.Congratulations to my Good Morning Britain colleagues, who triumphed for the second year even without the help of their great leader Piers Morgan  SOMETIMES a sequel of a classic film is better never made. The now-abandoned Forrest Gump 2, it emerges, would have featured Tom Hanks’ iconic ­character riding the ­freeway with O J Simpson, dancing with Princess Diana and ­witnessing the Oklahoma City ­Bombing.Potentially brilliant? Yes. But much more likely catastrophically bad. Grease is my favourite movie of all time but, I promise you, I have never watched the much-maligned sequel.Sometimes it’s worth accepting you can’t improve perfection, no matter how much money might be made. AMERICA’s most famous women can’t resist a British bloke. How else to explain the unlikely ­courting going on between Brits host Jack Whitehall and ­legendary US socialite Paris Hilton?After romances with Kate Beckinsale and Gemma Chan, it’s proof that a wicked sense of humour means far more than a bulging bicep. [/boxout] Wootton’s Week GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk
22 Mar 19
The Irish Sun
MUNSTER welcome the visit of Italian side Zebre this weekend as the PRO14 returns to action. Here’s everything you need to know about the match: Munster take on Zebre this weekend What time is the match on at? Kick off for the match takes place at 7.45 pm on Saturday March 23rd at Thomond Park. What Irish TV channel is the match on? The match is being shown live on Eir Sport with coverage starting at 7.15 pm on Eir Sport 1. Zebre have the lowest point total in the competition Eir Sport customers can also live stream the match off of the Eir Sport app. What is the latest team news? MUNSTER: Mike Haley; Darren Sweetnam, Dan Goggin, Rory Scannell, Alex Wootton; JJ Hanrahan, Alby Mathewson; Jeremy Loughman, Rhys Marshall, Stephen Archer; Fineen Wycherley, Darren O’Shea; Jack O’Donoghue, Chris Cloete, CJ Stander ZEBRE: Edoardo Padovani, Gabriele Di Giulio, Giulio Bisegni, Tommaso Boni, James Elliott, Carlo Canna, Guglielmo Palazzani; Andrea Lovotti, Oliviero Fabiani, Roberto Tenga, David Sisi, George Biagi, Maxime Mbanda, Jimmy Tuivaiti, Renato Giammarioli What are the latest betting odds? Munster are the overwhelming favourites to get the win on Saturday evening at the price of 1/200. Zebre are extreme outsiders to come away from Thomond Park with a victory at the price of 45/1 while the draw is priced at 75/1. How have both teams done in the competition so far? [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN SPORT ” posts_category=”18″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Munster are still competing at the top end of the Conference A table as the PRO14 regular season enters the final four rounds of matches. Johann Van Graan’s side are currently second in Conference A, three points behind leaders Glasgow Warriors and 11 points clear of Connacht in third place, and the Reds remain in the fight to secure a home semi-final. Zebre sit at the foot of the table and, with just 18 points through 17 matches, the Italians have the lowest points total of any team in the competition.
22 Mar 19
RugbyLAD

Back in action. Head coach Johann van Graan has named his Munster team for tomorrow night’s PRO14 return against Zebre at Thomond Park. CJ Stander captains the side on his return from international duty with Jack O’Donoghue making his first start since recovering from a serious knee injury. There are seven changes to the side […]

22 Mar 19
Nouvelles Du Monde

// Debenhams a obtenu un financement de 200 millions de livres sterling // Le détaillant cherchait à l'origine 150 M £ // Confirmé le vendredi matin Debenhams a obtenu une injection de fonds de 200 millions de livres sterling afin de sauver l’entreprise et d’empêcher une campagne de prise de contrôle menée par Mike Ashley […]

20 Mar 19
Dirt Hub

Nearly five months after the crowning of the overall champion, Steve HOLCOMBE (GB – Beta), the 2019 EnduroGP season will start where the previous year finished; in Germany! The 162 entrants will tackle one of the country’s oldest races, the “Rund Um Dahlen”! Feature image courtesy of Future7Media A Historic Race The MSC Dahlen eV […]

23 Mar 19
Scorebook Live Washington

The state of Washington is well represented in the 2019 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament with 29 former high school players participating in March Madness. From Stanford freshmen twins Lacie and Lexie Hull to Gonzaga senior Zykera Rice, here’s a list of former Washington high school girls basketball players to root for in the NCAA Tournament. […]

19 Mar 19
News Archives Uk

In recent months, reports of a persistent fracture between the two brothers have multiplied. The rumors were fueled by speculation of a dispute involving their wives Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex, and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge. Dan Wootton, chief editor of Sun Id New, said the tensions were so exacerbated that they "can […]

18 Mar 19
The Scottish Sun
FROM the first Big Brother in 2000 through to the steamy scenes of Love Island, reality TV has thrown people together for onscreen entertainment. But Channel 5’s latest show The House of Extraordinary People, which sees nine men and women with unusual appearances living together for 10 days in a Yorkshire cottage, has caused controversy with some branding it a “latter day freak show.” The House of Extraordinary People throws nine people together in a Yorkshire house for ten days But 27-year-old Harnaam Kaur, who has a full beard as a result of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), has slammed the critics as “disgusting” and “offensive.” Harnaam stars in the show, which airs tonight, along with a man with no legs, another who is turning himself into a parrot through body modification, and a mum-of-four whose confidence has been destroyed by hundreds of tumours all over her face and body. It’s being billed as a vehicle to “confront prejudices” and starts with the line: “This is no modern day freak show. This determined group of people are here to be heard.” But Danielle Wootton, from disability equality charity Scope, expressed concern at the weekend saying: “But there is a fine line to tread between insight and understanding, and voyeurism and exploitation. “We hope that this programme is inclusive and gives disabled people a positive platform where the public can hear their voices, and gain a greater understanding of their lives.” Harnaam has a full beard due to PCOS and has suffered mental illness, abuse and death threats But motivational speaker Harnaam, who suffered horrendous bullying after growing facial hair at 11, says the show gives out a positive message. She tells Sun Online: “Every time someone who looks different to the Eurocentric beauty standard is on TV they are labelled as ‘freaks’ and it’s disgusting. “There are shows out there that are so fake but this show is real and can help people who are marginalised. “It’s 100 per cent positive and it’s going to help a lot of people so it’s horrendous that people are calling it a freak show. It’s offensive and degrading.” Harnaam made the decision to stop shaving at 16 I was suicidal by the end of secondary school The brave social media star first noticed her excess hair in year 6 and, shaved and waxed her face throughout her teens to get rid of it. She said: “I didn’t know I had facial hair until some boys at my school said ‘0h my God she’s got a moustache.’ “I looked in the mirror and said, ‘Damn I do.’ “I hit puberty, started my periods and went through really horrendous pain. I was diagnosed with the condition PCOS at the age of 11 or 12.” Harnaam is using her experiences to help other people and raise awareness Despite her efforts she suffered horrific bullying at school, being stabbed with pens, pushed around and kicked, as well as constantly mocked. As a result she suffered from anxiety, low self-esteem and self-harm in her teenage years. She said: “If you look like me in a world where other people want you to look like them, it leads to anxiety. “I went through bullying and low self-esteem and I became suicidal towards the end of secondary school.” I had no choice but to be strong At 16, she took the brave decision to embrace her facial hair and became the youngest woman to grow a full beard. Harnaam talks to Rachael on the show, after fleeing a bar where strangers approached the group “When I decided to grow out my beard I realised I had no choice but to be strong. “I knew I was going to look different and the world was going to see me in a very different way. I had to build myself up to be mentally thrown to the ground over and over again.” After pressure from family, she did shave off her beard at 17 but says she hated the result. “I cried my eyes out because at that second I was normal,” she said. “It took away something that makes me unique. I gave in when I should have been strong, I gave in to other people’s negative perceptions of me.” I get death threats and groped Since then, Harmaan has used her look to fight prejudice and injustice as well as highlighting the plight of the one in five women who suffer with PCOS. But not everyone appreciates her high profile and she says she often receives death threats. “People think I’m trans or in drag and I get mistaken for a man all the time,” she says. “I’ve heard everything about me and nothing shocks me anymore. [bc_video video_id=”6015289177001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”House of Extraordinary People star Rachael braves the swimming baths”] “I get a lot of death threats from insecure people and I don’t know where they are coming from so if I’m in a big crowd I do get social anxiety. “I have been groped in public. Rowdy men think it’s funny to grab my beard and I think that’s really disrespectful. “I’ve had people shouting abuse at me like ‘kill her before she has children’”. Harnaam says she agreed to do the show because she others to gain from her strength. She said: “Looking the way that I do I’ve gone through a lot. I want to help others who are different to overcome trials and tribulations and trauma. I want to help people cope with their differences as well.” Tumours all over her body Rachael’s confidence is at rock bottom in the house Harnaam is joined in the house by Rachael Reynolds, 43, from Huddersfield who suffers from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a rare genetic disorder that causes non-cancerous tumours to grow all over her body, inside and out. The married  mum-of-four first started noticing the condition in her teens but it got worse with each pregnancy. Rachael, who is also hard of hearing,  has had a lot of plastic surgery and laser treatment to remove her lumps but they continue to grow back. Rachael suffers from outbreaks of tumours all over her body Her confidence is at rock bottom on the show and she struggles in a scene where the group go swimming. She says: “I’ve got thousands of lumps all over my body. “I’m very self-conscious and I’m scared of public places and the way people react.” The man who wants to be a parrot Ted Parrotman has tattoos and body modifications to look like his favourite bird Ted Parrotman, 60, from Bristol, had numerous tattoos and body modifications – including cutting off his ears – to look more like his beloved parrots, of which he owns seven. Formerly known as Edward Richards, he has transdermal implants in his head and tattooed eyes. Ted now wants to have septum removed so his nose can be shaped more like a beak and to have multi-coloured teeth. He used to work in a shoe factory but has struggled to find a job since his body modifications. He says: “I want to look like a parrot because I love their colours and their characters. “Society judges people by their appearance. People think I’m a freak.” Man who had his healthy leg amputated Dan told the group he had his healthy leg amputated Dan Cooper, 74, from Wyoming, USA, shocks the house with his unusual story. Since he was a child, Dan felt as if his lower left leg and foot didn’t belong to him. It took him many years to discover that this rare condition has a name – body integrity identity disorder. [bc_video video_id=”6015289639001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=” Dan tells amazing story of how he lost his leg on House of Extraordinary People”] Sufferers have an intense desire to have a healthy limb amputated and in 2009, aged 64, Dan finally found a surgeon in Thailand to remove his lower leg – and he has no regrets. He says: “All my life I wanted to be one-legged. It is extreme but I wanted to be happy in my skin.” An ‘actual giant’ Aly is 6ft 9in and calls herself a giant At 6ft 9in, Aly Stosz, 29, an artist from New York City, USA is one of the tallest women the world. She documents her “humongous life” through her social media and artwork, telling people she’s an “actual giant”. The American artist doesn’t want other women who feel like they don’t fit the traditional beauty mould to feel less worthy. She says: “I’m 6ft 9in and I own it. “People do look at me all the time – and sometimes I wear sunglasses and headphones just to block it out.” The man bullies branded ‘a cow’ Bashir suffers from vitiligo but is proud of his condition Bashir Aziz, 24, a sales assistant and model, from London was born with a form of vitiligo. As a child his mother used to put make-up on his white patches to try to hide his condition. Bullies called him “cow” or “zebra” at school but Bashir is now proud of his condition and flaunts his body on social media, spreading his message of body confidence. He says: “I started off with all the white patches and then as I get older my black spots flourish. “I’m like the Benjamin Button of vitiligo. When I was younger I just wanted to fit in but now I’m happy to stand out.” The short person who has to buy clothes to fit toddlers Kristin suffers from dwarfism and is 3ft 5.5in Kristin Riley, 36, an activities co-ordinator in an elderly care home, from Michigan, USA is one of the oldest people in the world with primordial dwarfism, the eldest being just 40 years old. She is 3ft 5.5in tall and has to shop for clothes to fit toddlers. Her brother, also a primordial dwarf, died at 24 from a brain aneurysm, a common complication of the condition and she has had brain surgery to remove her own aneurysm. She tells the show: “I’m 3ft 5.5in. People do point at me but I try not to notice what’s going on around me.” Born with a facial deformity Lucas was bullied at school over his facial deformity Lucas Hayward, 22, a roofer, from Leicester, was born with a facial deformity called oculo-auriculo-fronto-nasal syndrome and has undergone multiple plastic surgeries to make his appearance more “normal”. The condition gave him a wider nose and tags on the left side of his face – he describes it as being similar to that of a cleft palate but with his nose. He experienced a lot of bullying as a child and is now a vocal anti-bullying campaigner for disfigurement charity, Changing Faces. His work with the charity led to him being one of the Olympic torchbearers in 2012, aged 15. He says: “I was born with a facial deformity where my face over-developed. I’ve had a lot of surgery. “I’ve been through a lot so I just want people to know that personality is a lot bigger than the way you look.” Man whose legs stopped growing Rowdy walks ion his hands after having his legs amputated Rowdy Burton, 31, from Alabama, USA was born with the genetic condition sacral agenesis, which meant that his legs stopped growing and he had both amputated when he was a toddler. He walks on his hands and uses a motorised skateboard to get around. [article-rail-section title=”Most read in TV and Showbiz” posts_category=”6″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Rowdy, who has recently moved in with his girlfriend, uses his YouTube channel to discuss living with no legs. He says: “I’d like to change the constant assumption that I can’t do things. “You might be right but I’m going to give it a try.” The House Of Extraordinary People starts on Monday at 10pm on, C5.
18 Mar 19
The Irish Sun
FROM the first Big Brother in 2000 through to the steamy scenes of Love Island, reality TV has thrown people together for onscreen entertainment. But Channel 5’s latest show The House of Extraordinary People, which sees nine men and women with unusual appearances living together for 10 days in a Yorkshire cottage, has caused controversy with some branding it a “latter day freak show.” The House of Extraordinary People throws nine people together in a Yorkshire house for ten days But 27-year-old Harnaam Kaur, who has a full beard as a result of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), has slammed the critics as “disgusting” and “offensive.” Harnaam stars in the show, which airs tonight, along with a man with no legs, another who is turning himself into a parrot through body modification, and a mum-of-four whose confidence has been destroyed by hundreds of tumours all over her face and body. It’s being billed as a vehicle to “confront prejudices” and starts with the line: “This is no modern day freak show. This determined group of people are here to be heard.” But Danielle Wootton, from disability equality charity Scope, expressed concern at the weekend saying: “But there is a fine line to tread between insight and understanding, and voyeurism and exploitation. “We hope that this programme is inclusive and gives disabled people a positive platform where the public can hear their voices, and gain a greater understanding of their lives.” Harnaam has a full beard due to PCOS and has suffered mental illness, abuse and death threats But motivational speaker Harnaam, who suffered horrendous bullying after growing facial hair at 11, says the show gives out a positive message. She tells Sun Online: “Every time someone who looks different to the Eurocentric beauty standard is on TV they are labelled as ‘freaks’ and it’s disgusting. “There are shows out there that are so fake but this show is real and can help people who are marginalised. “It’s 100 per cent positive and it’s going to help a lot of people so it’s horrendous that people are calling it a freak show. It’s offensive and degrading.” Harnaam made the decision to stop shaving at 16 I was suicidal by the end of secondary school The brave social media star first noticed her excess hair in year 6 and, shaved and waxed her face throughout her teens to get rid of it. She said: “I didn’t know I had facial hair until some boys at my school said ‘0h my God she’s got a moustache.’ “I looked in the mirror and said, ‘Damn I do.’ “I hit puberty, started my periods and went through really horrendous pain. I was diagnosed with the condition PCOS at the age of 11 or 12.” Harnaam is using her experiences to help other people and raise awareness Despite her efforts she suffered horrific bullying at school, being stabbed with pens, pushed around and kicked, as well as constantly mocked. As a result she suffered from anxiety, low self-esteem and self-harm in her teenage years. She said: “If you look like me in a world where other people want you to look like them, it leads to anxiety. “I went through bullying and low self-esteem and I became suicidal towards the end of secondary school.” I had no choice but to be strong At 16, she took the brave decision to embrace her facial hair and became the youngest woman to grow a full beard. Harnaam talks to Rachael on the show, after fleeing a bar where strangers approached the group “When I decided to grow out my beard I realised I had no choice but to be strong. “I knew I was going to look different and the world was going to see me in a very different way. I had to build myself up to be mentally thrown to the ground over and over again.” After pressure from family, she did shave off her beard at 17 but says she hated the result. “I cried my eyes out because at that second I was normal,” she said. “It took away something that makes me unique. I gave in when I should have been strong, I gave in to other people’s negative perceptions of me.” I get death threats and groped Since then, Harmaan has used her look to fight prejudice and injustice as well as highlighting the plight of the one in five women who suffer with PCOS. But not everyone appreciates her high profile and she says she often receives death threats. “People think I’m trans or in drag and I get mistaken for a man all the time,” she says. “I’ve heard everything about me and nothing shocks me anymore. [bc_video video_id=”6015289177001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”House of Extraordinary People star Rachael braves the swimming baths”] “I get a lot of death threats from insecure people and I don’t know where they are coming from so if I’m in a big crowd I do get social anxiety. “I have been groped in public. Rowdy men think it’s funny to grab my beard and I think that’s really disrespectful. “I’ve had people shouting abuse at me like ‘kill her before she has children’”. Harnaam says she agreed to do the show because she others to gain from her strength. She said: “Looking the way that I do I’ve gone through a lot. I want to help others who are different to overcome trials and tribulations and trauma. I want to help people cope with their differences as well.” Tumours all over her body Rachael’s confidence is at rock bottom in the house Harnaam is joined in the house by Rachael Reynolds, 43, from Huddersfield who suffers from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a rare genetic disorder that causes non-cancerous tumours to grow all over her body, inside and out. The married  mum-of-four first started noticing the condition in her teens but it got worse with each pregnancy. Rachael, who is also hard of hearing,  has had a lot of plastic surgery and laser treatment to remove her lumps but they continue to grow back. Rachael suffers from outbreaks of tumours all over her body Her confidence is at rock bottom on the show and she struggles in a scene where the group go swimming. She says: “I’ve got thousands of lumps all over my body. “I’m very self-conscious and I’m scared of public places and the way people react.” The man who wants to be a parrot Ted Parrotman has tattoos and body modifications to look like his favourite bird Ted Parrotman, 60, from Bristol, had numerous tattoos and body modifications – including cutting off his ears – to look more like his beloved parrots, of which he owns seven. Formerly known as Edward Richards, he has transdermal implants in his head and tattooed eyes. Ted now wants to have septum removed so his nose can be shaped more like a beak and to have multi-coloured teeth. He used to work in a shoe factory but has struggled to find a job since his body modifications. He says: “I want to look like a parrot because I love their colours and their characters. “Society judges people by their appearance. People think I’m a freak.” Man who had his healthy leg amputated Dan told the group he had his healthy leg amputated Dan Cooper, 74, from Wyoming, USA, shocks the house with his unusual story. Since he was a child, Dan felt as if his lower left leg and foot didn’t belong to him. It took him many years to discover that this rare condition has a name – body integrity identity disorder. [bc_video video_id=”6015289639001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=” Dan tells amazing story of how he lost his leg on House of Extraordinary People”] Sufferers have an intense desire to have a healthy limb amputated and in 2009, aged 64, Dan finally found a surgeon in Thailand to remove his lower leg – and he has no regrets. He says: “All my life I wanted to be one-legged. It is extreme but I wanted to be happy in my skin.” An ‘actual giant’ Aly is 6ft 9in and calls herself a giant At 6ft 9in, Aly Stosz, 29, an artist from New York City, USA is one of the tallest women the world. She documents her “humongous life” through her social media and artwork, telling people she’s an “actual giant”. The American artist doesn’t want other women who feel like they don’t fit the traditional beauty mould to feel less worthy. She says: “I’m 6ft 9in and I own it. “People do look at me all the time – and sometimes I wear sunglasses and headphones just to block it out.” The man bullies branded ‘a cow’ Bashir suffers from vitiligo but is proud of his condition Bashir Aziz, 24, a sales assistant and model, from London was born with a form of vitiligo. As a child his mother used to put make-up on his white patches to try to hide his condition. Bullies called him “cow” or “zebra” at school but Bashir is now proud of his condition and flaunts his body on social media, spreading his message of body confidence. He says: “I started off with all the white patches and then as I get older my black spots flourish. “I’m like the Benjamin Button of vitiligo. When I was younger I just wanted to fit in but now I’m happy to stand out.” The short person who has to buy clothes to fit toddlers Kristin suffers from dwarfism and is 3ft 5.5in Kristin Riley, 36, an activities co-ordinator in an elderly care home, from Michigan, USA is one of the oldest people in the world with primordial dwarfism, the eldest being just 40 years old. She is 3ft 5.5in tall and has to shop for clothes to fit toddlers. Her brother, also a primordial dwarf, died at 24 from a brain aneurysm, a common complication of the condition and she has had brain surgery to remove her own aneurysm. She tells the show: “I’m 3ft 5.5in. People do point at me but I try not to notice what’s going on around me.” Born with a facial deformity Lucas was bullied at school over his facial deformity Lucas Hayward, 22, a roofer, from Leicester, was born with a facial deformity called oculo-auriculo-fronto-nasal syndrome and has undergone multiple plastic surgeries to make his appearance more “normal”. The condition gave him a wider nose and tags on the left side of his face – he describes it as being similar to that of a cleft palate but with his nose. He experienced a lot of bullying as a child and is now a vocal anti-bullying campaigner for disfigurement charity, Changing Faces. His work with the charity led to him being one of the Olympic torchbearers in 2012, aged 15. He says: “I was born with a facial deformity where my face over-developed. I’ve had a lot of surgery. “I’ve been through a lot so I just want people to know that personality is a lot bigger than the way you look.” Man whose legs stopped growing Rowdy walks ion his hands after having his legs amputated Rowdy Burton, 31, from Alabama, USA was born with the genetic condition sacral agenesis, which meant that his legs stopped growing and he had both amputated when he was a toddler. He walks on his hands and uses a motorised skateboard to get around. [article-rail-section title=”Most read in TV and Showbiz” posts_category=”169″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Rowdy, who has recently moved in with his girlfriend, uses his YouTube channel to discuss living with no legs. He says: “I’d like to change the constant assumption that I can’t do things. “You might be right but I’m going to give it a try.” The House Of Extraordinary People starts on Monday at 10pm on, C5.
18 Mar 19
The Sun
FROM the first Big Brother in 2000 through to the steamy scenes of Love Island, reality TV has thrown people together for onscreen entertainment. But Channel 5’s latest show The House of Extraordinary People, which sees nine men and women with unusual appearances living together for 10 days in a Yorkshire cottage, has caused controversy with some branding it a “latter day freak show.” The House of Extraordinary People throws nine people together in a Yorkshire house for ten days But 27-year-old Harnaam Kaur, who has a full beard as a result of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), has slammed the critics as “disgusting” and “offensive.” Harnaam stars in the show, which airs tonight, along with a man with no legs, another who is turning himself into a parrot through body modification, and a mum-of-four whose confidence has been destroyed by hundreds of tumours all over her face and body. It’s being billed as a vehicle to “confront prejudices” and starts with the line: “This is no modern day freak show. This determined group of people are here to be heard.” But Danielle Wootton, from disability equality charity Scope, expressed concern at the weekend saying: “But there is a fine line to tread between insight and understanding, and voyeurism and exploitation. “We hope that this programme is inclusive and gives disabled people a positive platform where the public can hear their voices, and gain a greater understanding of their lives.” Harnaam has a full beard due to PCOS and has suffered mental illness, abuse and death threats But motivational speaker Harnaam, who suffered horrendous bullying after growing facial hair at 11, says the show gives out a positive message. She tells Sun Online: “Every time someone who looks different to the Eurocentric beauty standard is on TV they are labelled as ‘freaks’ and it’s disgusting. “There are shows out there that are so fake but this show is real and can help people who are marginalised. “It’s 100 per cent positive and it’s going to help a lot of people so it’s horrendous that people are calling it a freak show. It’s offensive and degrading.” Harnaam made the decision to stop shaving at 16 I was suicidal by the end of secondary school The brave social media star first noticed her excess hair in year 6 and, shaved and waxed her face throughout her teens to get rid of it. She said: “I didn’t know I had facial hair until some boys at my school said ‘0h my God she’s got a moustache.’ “I looked in the mirror and said, ‘Damn I do.’ “I hit puberty, started my periods and went through really horrendous pain. I was diagnosed with the condition PCOS at the age of 11 or 12.” Harnaam is using her experiences to help other people and raise awareness Despite her efforts she suffered horrific bullying at school, being stabbed with pens, pushed around and kicked, as well as constantly mocked. As a result she suffered from anxiety, low self-esteem and self-harm in her teenage years. She said: “If you look like me in a world where other people want you to look like them, it leads to anxiety. “I went through bullying and low self-esteem and I became suicidal towards the end of secondary school.” I had no choice but to be strong At 16, she took the brave decision to embrace her facial hair and became the youngest woman to grow a full beard. Harnaam talks to Rachael on the show, after fleeing a bar where strangers approached the group “When I decided to grow out my beard I realised I had no choice but to be strong. “I knew I was going to look different and the world was going to see me in a very different way. I had to build myself up to be mentally thrown to the ground over and over again.” After pressure from family, she did shave off her beard at 17 but says she hated the result. “I cried my eyes out because at that second I was normal,” she said. “It took away something that makes me unique. I gave in when I should have been strong, I gave in to other people’s negative perceptions of me.” I get death threats and groped Since then, Harmaan has used her look to fight prejudice and injustice as well as highlighting the plight of the one in five women who suffer with PCOS. But not everyone appreciates her high profile and she says she often receives death threats. “People think I’m trans or in drag and I get mistaken for a man all the time,” she says. “I’ve heard everything about me and nothing shocks me anymore. [bc_video video_id=”6015289177001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”House of Extraordinary People star Rachael braves the swimming baths”] “I get a lot of death threats from insecure people and I don’t know where they are coming from so if I’m in a big crowd I do get social anxiety. “I have been groped in public. Rowdy men think it’s funny to grab my beard and I think that’s really disrespectful. “I’ve had people shouting abuse at me like ‘kill her before she has children’”. Harnaam says she agreed to do the show because she others to gain from her strength. She said: “Looking the way that I do I’ve gone through a lot. I want to help others who are different to overcome trials and tribulations and trauma. I want to help people cope with their differences as well.” Tumours all over her body Rachael’s confidence is at rock bottom in the house Harnaam is joined in the house by Rachael Reynolds, 43, from Huddersfield who suffers from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a rare genetic disorder that causes non-cancerous tumours to grow all over her body, inside and out. The married  mum-of-four first started noticing the condition in her teens but it got worse with each pregnancy. Rachael, who is also hard of hearing,  has had a lot of plastic surgery and laser treatment to remove her lumps but they continue to grow back. Rachael suffers from outbreaks of tumours all over her body Her confidence is at rock bottom on the show and she struggles in a scene where the group go swimming. She says: “I’ve got thousands of lumps all over my body. “I’m very self-conscious and I’m scared of public places and the way people react.” The man who wants to be a parrot Ted Parrotman has tattoos and body modifications to look like his favourite bird Ted Parrotman, 60, from Bristol, had numerous tattoos and body modifications – including cutting off his ears – to look more like his beloved parrots, of which he owns seven. Formerly known as Edward Richards, he has transdermal implants in his head and tattooed eyes. Ted now wants to have septum removed so his nose can be shaped more like a beak and to have multi-coloured teeth. He used to work in a shoe factory but has struggled to find a job since his body modifications. He says: “I want to look like a parrot because I love their colours and their characters. “Society judges people by their appearance. People think I’m a freak.” Man who had his healthy leg amputated Dan told the group he had his healthy leg amputated Dan Cooper, 74, from Wyoming, USA, shocks the house with his unusual story. Since he was a child, Dan felt as if his lower left leg and foot didn’t belong to him. It took him many years to discover that this rare condition has a name – body integrity identity disorder. [bc_video video_id=”6015289639001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=” Dan tells amazing story of how he lost his leg on House of Extraordinary People”] Sufferers have an intense desire to have a healthy limb amputated and in 2009, aged 64, Dan finally found a surgeon in Thailand to remove his lower leg – and he has no regrets. He says: “All my life I wanted to be one-legged. It is extreme but I wanted to be happy in my skin.” An ‘actual giant’ Aly is 6ft 9in and calls herself a giant At 6ft 9in, Aly Stosz, 29, an artist from New York City, USA is one of the tallest women the world. She documents her “humongous life” through her social media and artwork, telling people she’s an “actual giant”. The American artist doesn’t want other women who feel like they don’t fit the traditional beauty mould to feel less worthy. She says: “I’m 6ft 9in and I own it. “People do look at me all the time – and sometimes I wear sunglasses and headphones just to block it out.” The man bullies branded ‘a cow’ Bashir suffers from vitiligo but is proud of his condition Bashir Aziz, 24, a sales assistant and model, from London was born with a form of vitiligo. As a child his mother used to put make-up on his white patches to try to hide his condition. Bullies called him “cow” or “zebra” at school but Bashir is now proud of his condition and flaunts his body on social media, spreading his message of body confidence. He says: “I started off with all the white patches and then as I get older my black spots flourish. “I’m like the Benjamin Button of vitiligo. When I was younger I just wanted to fit in but now I’m happy to stand out.” The short person who has to buy clothes to fit toddlers Kristin suffers from dwarfism and is 3ft 5.5in Kristin Riley, 36, an activities co-ordinator in an elderly care home, from Michigan, USA is one of the oldest people in the world with primordial dwarfism, the eldest being just 40 years old. She is 3ft 5.5in tall and has to shop for clothes to fit toddlers. Her brother, also a primordial dwarf, died at 24 from a brain aneurysm, a common complication of the condition and she has had brain surgery to remove her own aneurysm. She tells the show: “I’m 3ft 5.5in. People do point at me but I try not to notice what’s going on around me.” Born with a facial deformity Lucas was bullied at school over his facial deformity Lucas Hayward, 22, a roofer, from Leicester, was born with a facial deformity called oculo-auriculo-fronto-nasal syndrome and has undergone multiple plastic surgeries to make his appearance more “normal”. The condition gave him a wider nose and tags on the left side of his face – he describes it as being similar to that of a cleft palate but with his nose. He experienced a lot of bullying as a child and is now a vocal anti-bullying campaigner for disfigurement charity, Changing Faces. His work with the charity led to him being one of the Olympic torchbearers in 2012, aged 15. He says: “I was born with a facial deformity where my face over-developed. I’ve had a lot of surgery. “I’ve been through a lot so I just want people to know that personality is a lot bigger than the way you look.” Man whose legs stopped growing Rowdy walks ion his hands after having his legs amputated Rowdy Burton, 31, from Alabama, USA was born with the genetic condition sacral agenesis, which meant that his legs stopped growing and he had both amputated when he was a toddler. He walks on his hands and uses a motorised skateboard to get around. [article-rail-section title=”Most read in TV and Showbiz” posts_category=”325″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Rowdy, who has recently moved in with his girlfriend, uses his YouTube channel to discuss living with no legs. He says: “I’d like to change the constant assumption that I can’t do things. “You might be right but I’m going to give it a try.” The House Of Extraordinary People starts on Monday at 10pm on, C5.