Denver Nuggets

26 May 19
Sport Archives

During the last few decades, no NBA team like San Antonio Spurs may have had any track record in terms of drafting influential players and key participants. Of course, it is probably part of this that Greg Popovich is one of the greatest coaches in the history of the league, and old soldiers at the […]

26 May 19
High Velocity Sport

Jeff Chiu/Associated Press The Toronto Raptors advanced to their first NBA Finals with a 100-94 win over the Milwaukee Bucks Saturday. Kawhi Leonard scored a game-high 27 points to lead his club to a fourth consecutive victory. Raptors team president Masai Ujiri drew criticism because of the way he dealt forward DeMar DeRozan to the […]

26 May 19
High Velocity Sport

Jeff Chiu/Associated Press The Toronto Raptors advanced to their first NBA Finals with a 100-94 win over the Milwaukee Bucks Saturday. Kawhi Leonard scored a game-high 27 points to lead his club to a fourth consecutive victory. Raptors team president Masai Ujiri drew criticism because of the way he dealt forward DeMar DeRozan to the […]

26 May 19
NYDaily.news

Tim Warner/Getty Images Denver Nuggets Paul Millsap is a must-keep for Denver, but his $30 million team option nullifies his candidacy. He’ll only reach the open market if the Nuggets let him, which they won’t do without the intention of re-signing him to a…

26 May 19
The Denver Post
If there was a silver-lining to Michael Porter Jr.’s redshirt rookie season, it’s that he got a graduate course in NBA lifestyle without having to take the exams. Denver’s prized first-round pick of 2018 was exposed to the demanding travel and reaped the benefits of NBA coaching and trainers. But unlike the other rookies in his class, Porter Jr. soaked in the experience from the bench, watching in dress clothes as his teammates flourished into a Western Conference contender. After months of anticipation and viral glimpses of his talent, Porter Jr. is expected to make his professional debut at Las Vegas Summer League in July. The biggest question surrounding Porter Jr. is his health. Weeks after the Nuggets pounced on Porter Jr. with the No. 14 pick, he underwent a second back surgery in eight months. The first was a microdiscectomy while at Missouri; the second was on his lumbar spine last July. The Nuggets never planned on him playing this past season but his return to competitive basketball was further hampered after he developed drop foot, according to league sources, which was a symptom of his back surgeries. With drop foot, it’s difficult to lift the front part of one’s foot, causing it to drag. It’s sometimes a result of a herniated disk – and thus a pinched nerve – in one’s lower back. When Porter Jr. debuts in Summer League, he’ll wear a brace on his leg to help stabilize it, sources said. He’s worn the brace for months. The Nuggets wouldn’t confirm another injury but see it as a residual effect of his lower back surgery. They also remain highly encouraged by Porter Jr.’s progression. “To be honest, going into the season, I didn’t really expect myself to be able to play at 100 percent if I was to come play,” Porter Jr. said last week. “But like, the way I feel now, it’s leaps and bounds beyond where I thought I’d be at this point. I feel so good. … I feel like I’m a better player than I’ve ever been.” It won’t be until Summer League that the Nuggets can gauge how beneficial this past season was and what kind of talent they’ve been harboring. The Nuggets will rejoice if it’s the same route Philadelphia’s Ben Simmons pioneered. Due to a foot injury that kept him sidelined, Simmons won Rookie of the Year two years after he was drafted. “It’s a huge advantage,” said Porter Jr. of his indoctrination to the league. “Just being on the bench, watching them play, seeing where I’m going to get my shots in the offense, and just learning the NBA game. It’s a lot different than college, spacing, and everything.” While the rest of the Nuggets quickly went their separate ways in the wake of their stinging Game 7 loss to Portland, Porter Jr. said he wouldn’t allow himself much time to rest leading into Summer League. There will be more rehabbing – strengthening his core, improving his balance – and more uninhibited workouts. “This is a new season for me,” he said. “I’m getting ready to play.” How the fluid 6-foot-10 Porter Jr. will look in Las Vegas may be the most significant storyline of the summer for the Nuggets. When the Nuggets were on the road, it wasn’t uncommon to see Porter Jr. competing in 3-on-3 games several hours before tip-off. In those settings, his smooth jumper and savvy ball handling for a player of his size were impressive. The question, now that he’s begun playing 5-on-5 again, is whether he still has the same athleticism, post surgeries, that once made him the No. 1 high school recruit in the country. “What I’ve seen from Michael this year in flashes, is a guy with tremendous size and length, that’s got deep range, that can shoot the ball, that can put the ball on the floor and has great athleticism to finish at the rim,” said Nuggets coach Michael Malone. “This will be a really big summer for Michael.” During exit interviews, no less than three of his teammates remarked on Porter Jr.’s confidence – which apparently was impossible to miss. “Mike’s been talking all year long,” veteran Paul Millsap said. “I’m definitely going to be at the Summer League games. … He’s got a lot of swag and a lot of sauce to himself.” Backup point guard Monte Morris tried to conceal a grin when asked about him. “He’s special, for sure,” Morris said. “And the best thing about Mike, he feels like he’s the best player on the court at all times.” Even All-Star Nikola Jokic took a friendly jab at the celebrated rookie. “To be honest, I am (very excited to see him play) because he is talking a lot,” Jokic quipped. “Just how he’s working out and playing with guys, you can see he has a gift.” Now that he’s built himself up, the challenge for Porter Jr. is to simmer those expectations. He hasn’t played competitive basketball since March of 2018 with Missouri, and there’s likely the temptation to prove he’s all the way back with one thunderous dunk in Vegas. That wouldn’t be prudent for a Nuggets team that’s taken the long-view to this point and is counting on him as a contributor next season. “Just trying to temper everybody’s expectations,” said Malone, who is well aware of the excitement brewing ahead of his debut. “When you miss a whole year, it doesn’t happen right away.”
26 May 19
High Velocity Sport

Duke’s Zion WilliamsonPatrick Semansky/Associated Press The NBA has largely become a position-less sport, with players regularly rotation roles to fit the situation. Yet, teams should and do still recognize base positions when looking to fill needs on their rosters. Take postseason standout Kawhi Leonard, for example. Sure, he is capable of playing on the perimeter […]

26 May 19
High Velocity Sport

For the first time ever, the Toronto Raptors are headed to the NBA’s championship stage.  Toronto clinched its inaugural Finals trip with a 100-94 win in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals against the Milwaukee Bucks. In doing so, they have put an end to one of the NBA’s longest Finals droughts. The 2019 […]

26 May 19
Daily Republic

May 25– May 25–OAKLAND — “God willing,” Iguodala said following practice on Saturday. Iguodala described himself as feeling “good” and even maintained he feels 100 percent after completing a shooting workout on Saturday. Then again, that is all relatively speaking for the 35-year-old Iguodala. He has been sidelined since feeling tightness and soreness in his […]

26 May 19
Daily Republic

May 26– May 26–OAKLAND — “God willing, no,” Iguodala said following practice on Saturday. Iguodala described himself as feeling “good” and even maintained he feels 100 percent after completing a shooting workout on Saturday. Then again, that is all relatively speaking for the 35-year-old Iguodala. He has been sidelined since feeling tightness and soreness in […]

26 May 19
VOICE OF THE HWY

CLOSE It all comes down to this. The long playoff journey has arrived at the NBA Finals. It’s time to decide the Larry O’Brien Trophy and the NBA championship. The Golden State Warriors are back in the Finals for the fifth consecutive year after sweeping the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference finals. The […]

26 May 19
Toronto Sun

Normally in an evenly matched series like the Eastern Conference final, it is the coach who makes the better adjustments mid-series that comes out victorious. Through five games that has been Toronto’s Nick Nurse and it’s not even been close. Nurse showed a willingness to adapt and change on the fly in the second round […]

25 May 19
Times-Standard
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – It may have been hard to decipher Andre Iguodala’s playful sarcasm. Despite sitting out of practices for the past three days to heal soreness in his left calf, Iguodala sounded optimistic he will have no issues entering Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. “God willing, no,” Iguodala said following practice on Saturday. Iguodala described himself as feeling “good” and even maintained he feels 100 percent after completing a shooting workout on Saturday. Then again, that is all relatively speaking for the 35-year-old Iguodala. He has been sidelined since feeling tightness and soreness in his left calf last week during the Warriors’ eventual Game 3 win over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. And after playing for 12 NBA seasons including four consecutive NBA Finals, Iguodala found it easy to trace the source of his injury. “Just a lot of minutes and overuse. I’m old,” Iguodala said. “It just flared up real quick, but we have a good training staff. When you’ve been playing for five long seasons, it’s bound to come up. It’s rare that you see it. It’s hard for it to be realized. My career is almost over, anyway. So I don’t really care.” Iguodala said those words with obvious facetiousness. Almost a month ago, Iguodala maintained confidence he could play past his current contract that expires in the 2020 offseason. So why does Iguodala suddenly think his career will end “soon?” “I didn’t change my mind,” Iguodala said. “It’s ‘If I want to.’ I can sign a one-year deal. It’s the beauty of having a sense of self.” Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group The Warriors have handled Iguodala with care in recent seasons, which is one of many reasons why they might benefit from the nine-day layoff before playing with Milwaukee or Toronto in Game 1 on Thursday. Just like they did in regular season, the Warriors can ease Iguodala’s workload leading into Game 1. Just like they saw in the regular season, the Warriors expect Iguodala to thrive once again in the NBA Finals. “It’s been good. But it’s weird, though. At one point, you want to relax and just enjoy it. The other part is you have to pay attention to every game and know what’s going on,” Iguodala said. “You still get antsy and have some anxiety that the season is still going on. That’s stuff that human beings deal with. But since we’re super athletes, people don’t take that into account and they don’t care.” Iguodala has figured out how to spend his time just fine, though. He has resisted golfing, mindful that his favorite hobby might relax his mind at the expense of his left calf. Instead, Iguodala has sat out for most of the Warriors’ practices in favor strengthening his calf before completing light shooting workouts. Despite his current injury, this hardly compares to what Iguodala faced last season. Then, he missed a combined 24 games because of various ailments to his knees, ankles and shoulders. Because of a bothersome left leg, Iguodala also missed four games of the Western Conference Finals against Houston and the first two games of the NBA Finals against Cleveland. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Iguodala declined to reflect on last season. After having a non-invasive procedure on his left leg last summer, though, Iguodala only missed a combined 14 games this season for minor ailments and rest purposes. Then, Iguodala averaged a career-low 5.7 points, but he shot 50 percent from the field, his second-most efficient shooting season during his five-year run with the Warriors. In the postseason, Iguodala has played even better. He always does. This year, though, Iguodala’s scoring average (10.1) mirror his output in the 2015 NBA playoffs when he won Finals MVP (10.4). Iguodala has also averaged a post-season best 52.2 percent from the field. “I felt like I had a good year,” Iguodala said. “I played more this year. It was explosive minutes, too. I felt pretty good. Hopefully I can continue to do it for however many long I have. That’s part of the plan. I’m confident in myself I can do it anywhere.” After all, Iguodala was the Philadelphia 76er’s franchise player for an eight-year stretch (2004-12) that coincided with an All-Star appearance (2012) and a U.S. Olympic appearance (2012). After being part of a four-team trade that included the Denver Nuggets (2012-13), the Warriors then signed Iguodala a year later. Following Steve Kerr’s hiring, Iguodala then accepted a bench role without complaining. “It’s good fortune, but I try to maximize it with the work ethic,” Iguodala said. “I’m trying to make smart decisions surround myself with the right people and mature and grow each and every year.” Iguodala has done that, setting himself for another anticipated return to the NBA Finals that the Warriors expect will yield more results. “We have a tough series ahead. But I’m going to enjoy it,” Iguodala said. “I’m about to be done playing, anyway.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
25 May 19
The Reporter
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – It may have been hard to decipher Andre Iguodala’s playful sarcasm. Despite sitting out of practices for the past three days to heal soreness in his left calf, Iguodala sounded optimistic he will have no issues entering Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. “God willing, no,” Iguodala said following practice on Saturday. Iguodala described himself as feeling “good” and even maintained he feels 100 percent after completing a shooting workout on Saturday. Then again, that is all relatively speaking for the 35-year-old Iguodala. He has been sidelined since feeling tightness and soreness in his left calf last week during the Warriors’ eventual Game 3 win over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. And after playing for 12 NBA seasons including four consecutive NBA Finals, Iguodala found it easy to trace the source of his injury. “Just a lot of minutes and overuse. I’m old,” Iguodala said. “It just flared up real quick, but we have a good training staff. When you’ve been playing for five long seasons, it’s bound to come up. It’s rare that you see it. It’s hard for it to be realized. My career is almost over, anyway. So I don’t really care.” Iguodala said those words with obvious facetiousness. Almost a month ago, Iguodala maintained confidence he could play past his current contract that expires in the 2020 offseason. So why does Iguodala suddenly think his career will end “soon?” “I didn’t change my mind,” Iguodala said. “It’s ‘If I want to.’ I can sign a one-year deal. It’s the beauty of having a sense of self.” Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group The Warriors have handled Iguodala with care in recent seasons, which is one of many reasons why they might benefit from the nine-day layoff before playing with Milwaukee or Toronto in Game 1 on Thursday. Just like they did in regular season, the Warriors can ease Iguodala’s workload leading into Game 1. Just like they saw in the regular season, the Warriors expect Iguodala to thrive once again in the NBA Finals. “It’s been good. But it’s weird, though. At one point, you want to relax and just enjoy it. The other part is you have to pay attention to every game and know what’s going on,” Iguodala said. “You still get antsy and have some anxiety that the season is still going on. That’s stuff that human beings deal with. But since we’re super athletes, people don’t take that into account and they don’t care.” Iguodala has figured out how to spend his time just fine, though. He has resisted golfing, mindful that his favorite hobby might relax his mind at the expense of his left calf. Instead, Iguodala has sat out for most of the Warriors’ practices in favor strengthening his calf before completing light shooting workouts. Despite his current injury, this hardly compares to what Iguodala faced last season. Then, he missed a combined 24 games because of various ailments to his knees, ankles and shoulders. Because of a bothersome left leg, Iguodala also missed four games of the Western Conference Finals against Houston and the first two games of the NBA Finals against Cleveland. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Iguodala declined to reflect on last season. After having a non-invasive procedure on his left leg last summer, though, Iguodala only missed a combined 14 games this season for minor ailments and rest purposes. Then, Iguodala averaged a career-low 5.7 points, but he shot 50 percent from the field, his second-most efficient shooting season during his five-year run with the Warriors. In the postseason, Iguodala has played even better. He always does. This year, though, Iguodala’s scoring average (10.1) mirror his output in the 2015 NBA playoffs when he won Finals MVP (10.4). Iguodala has also averaged a post-season best 52.2 percent from the field. “I felt like I had a good year,” Iguodala said. “I played more this year. It was explosive minutes, too. I felt pretty good. Hopefully I can continue to do it for however many long I have. That’s part of the plan. I’m confident in myself I can do it anywhere.” After all, Iguodala was the Philadelphia 76er’s franchise player for an eight-year stretch (2004-12) that coincided with an All-Star appearance (2012) and a U.S. Olympic appearance (2012). After being part of a four-team trade that included the Denver Nuggets (2012-13), the Warriors then signed Iguodala a year later. Following Steve Kerr’s hiring, Iguodala then accepted a bench role without complaining. “It’s good fortune, but I try to maximize it with the work ethic,” Iguodala said. “I’m trying to make smart decisions surround myself with the right people and mature and grow each and every year.” Iguodala has done that, setting himself for another anticipated return to the NBA Finals that the Warriors expect will yield more results. “We have a tough series ahead. But I’m going to enjoy it,” Iguodala said. “I’m about to be done playing, anyway.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
25 May 19
East Bay Times
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – It may have been hard to decipher Andre Iguodala’s playful sarcasm. Despite sitting out of practices for the past three days to heal soreness in his left calf, Iguodala sounded optimistic he will have no issues entering Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. “God willing, no,” Iguodala said following practice on Saturday. Iguodala described himself as feeling “good” and even maintained he feels 100 percent after completing a shooting workout on Saturday. Then again, that is all relatively speaking for the 35-year-old Iguodala. He has been sidelined since feeling tightness and soreness in his left calf last week during the Warriors’ eventual Game 3 win over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. And after playing for 12 NBA seasons including four consecutive NBA Finals, Iguodala found it easy to trace the source of his injury. “Just a lot of minutes and overuse. I’m old,” Iguodala said. “It just flared up real quick, but we have a good training staff. When you’ve been playing for five long seasons, it’s bound to come up. It’s rare that you see it. It’s hard for it to be realized. My career is almost over, anyway. So I don’t really care.” Iguodala said those words with obvious facetiousness. Almost a month ago, Iguodala maintained confidence he could play past his current contract that expires in the 2020 offseason. So why does Iguodala suddenly think his career will end “soon?” “I didn’t change my mind,” Iguodala said. “It’s ‘If I want to.’ I can sign a one-year deal. It’s the beauty of having a sense of self.” Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group The Warriors have handled Iguodala with care in recent seasons, which is one of many reasons why they might benefit from the nine-day layoff before playing with Milwaukee or Toronto in Game 1 on Thursday. Just like they did in regular season, the Warriors can ease Iguodala’s workload leading into Game 1. Just like they saw in the regular season, the Warriors expect Iguodala to thrive once again in the NBA Finals. “It’s been good. But it’s weird, though. At one point, you want to relax and just enjoy it. The other part is you have to pay attention to every game and know what’s going on,” Iguodala said. “You still get antsy and have some anxiety that the season is still going on. That’s stuff that human beings deal with. But since we’re super athletes, people don’t take that into account and they don’t care.” Iguodala has figured out how to spend his time just fine, though. He has resisted golfing, mindful that his favorite hobby might relax his mind at the expense of his left calf. Instead, Iguodala has sat out for most of the Warriors’ practices in favor strengthening his calf before completing light shooting workouts. Despite his current injury, this hardly compares to what Iguodala faced last season. Then, he missed a combined 24 games because of various ailments to his knees, ankles and shoulders. Because of a bothersome left leg, Iguodala also missed four games of the Western Conference Finals against Houston and the first two games of the NBA Finals against Cleveland. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] Iguodala declined to reflect on last season. After having a non-invasive procedure on his left leg last summer, though, Iguodala only missed a combined 14 games this season for minor ailments and rest purposes. Then, Iguodala averaged a career-low 5.7 points, but he shot 50 percent from the field, his second-most efficient shooting season during his five-year run with the Warriors. In the postseason, Iguodala has played even better. He always does. This year, though, Iguodala’s scoring average (10.1) mirror his output in the 2015 NBA playoffs when he won Finals MVP (10.4). Iguodala has also averaged a post-season best 52.2 percent from the field. “I felt like I had a good year,” Iguodala said. “I played more this year. It was explosive minutes, too. I felt pretty good. Hopefully I can continue to do it for however many long I have. That’s part of the plan. I’m confident in myself I can do it anywhere.” After all, Iguodala was the Philadelphia 76er’s franchise player for an eight-year stretch (2004-12) that coincided with an All-Star appearance (2012) and a U.S. Olympic appearance (2012). After being part of a four-team trade that included the Denver Nuggets (2012-13), the Warriors then signed Iguodala a year later. Following Steve Kerr’s hiring, Iguodala then accepted a bench role without complaining. “It’s good fortune, but I try to maximize it with the work ethic,” Iguodala said. “I’m trying to make smart decisions surround myself with the right people and mature and grow each and every year.” Iguodala has done that, setting himself for another anticipated return to the NBA Finals that the Warriors expect will yield more results. “We have a tough series ahead. But I’m going to enjoy it,” Iguodala said. “I’m about to be done playing, anyway.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.