Desert

20 Jan 19
National Post

TUCSON, Ariz. — Brandon Williams scored 20 points and Arizona dominated the offensive glass despite a scary fall by big man Chase Jeter in an 82-71 victory over Oregon State on Saturday night. Following a lacklustre loss to Oregon, Arizona (14-5, 5-1 Pac-12) knocked off the Beavers with a slew of 3-pointers and offensive rebounds. […]

20 Jan 19
World's Today's News

PHOENIX (AP) – A federal judge found four women guilty of entering a wildlife refuge without a permit as they sought to place food and water in the Arizona desert for migrants. Judge Bernardo Velasco, on Friday, marked the first conviction against humanitarian aid volunteers in a decade. The conviction for each charge may vary […]

20 Jan 19
The Sun
Labour’s sick of calamity Corbyn THERESA May has endured the worst week of her political career. But Jeremy Corbyn has contrived to have an even more disastrous one. His cack-handed leadership has so dismayed Labour members that they are deserting the party in droves. Tens of thousands of Labour supporters have begun to desert the party More than 60,000 loyalists have torn up their membership cards since Labour’s high-water mark at the 2017 election, and that could rise to 100,000. They were already disillusioned by his inability to quell the anti-Semitism row and his failure to condemn Putin over the Salisbury poisonings. His decision to duck Brexit talks with the PM is the latest calamitous misjudgment to leave his party reeling. A new poll in today’s Sun on Sunday reveals 65 per cent of voters, a large proportion of them Labour supporters, believe he was barmy to snub Mrs May’s offer. It is further damning evidence that he is out of step with his own grass roots and rapidly losing their confidence. His decision to duck Brexit talks with the PM is the latest calamitous misjudgment to leave his party reeling One Corbynista ally is now proposing a customs union with the EU based on a model introduced by Venezuela. The South American country was idolised by half-baked Marxists like Corbyn when it was run by hard-left poster-boy Hugo Chavez. But largely thanks to Chavez it is now an economic basket case. Not unlike Labour under Corbyn. [bc_video video_id=”5990202381001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says a No Deal Brexit needs to be ruled out before talks with PM after no confidence motion fails”] Action on brutes at last FOR too long, women have suffered horrific abuse at the hands of brutish partners. The Government is launching a new set of laws that will make it illegal for domineering thugs to manipulate vulnerable partners by denying them money or use of a car. Shocking figures show two women are killed every week in domestic incidents. Now the Government is launching a new crackdown on domestic violence that will enshrine women’s legal rights to check on men they meet on the internet. The laws are a victory for The Sun on Sunday’s long-term domestic abuse campaign. They will make it illegal for domineering thugs to manipulate vulnerable partners by denying them money or use of a car. They will also force abusers into rehab if drink or drugs are involved. Although the measures have been long awaited, they are no less welcome for that. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN OPINION” posts_category=”317″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Great to see you, Ant ANT McPartlin is a national treasure. The whole nation will be glad to see Ant back at work He is the first to admit that his addictions drove him to terrible depths. But he has paid a high price to overcome them. The whole nation will be glad to see him back in Britain’s favourite double act. Welcome back, Ant, we missed you. [bc_video video_id=”5991071474001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Ant McPartlin says he is feeling ‘really really emotional’ as he finally reunites with pal Declan Donnelly on the Britain’s Got Talent stage”]
20 Jan 19
Let's Get Physical

The official health guideline for fruit and vegetable intake is 2 serves of fruit per day, 5 of vegetables. Australia’s ABC laments that on average Australians are only consuming half of that. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-20/how-to-eat-five-serves-of-vegetables-two-serves-of-fruit-a-day/10610626 But this lamentation is unnecessary in my opinion because the guidelines are set too high. The official guidelines on the Australian govt […]

20 Jan 19
iPhillySports

Phil Mickelson doesn’t have to be perfect to win the Desert Classic on Sunday, so expect plenty of drivers and aggressive shots from the lefty. from NBC Sports Philadelphia Rss Feed http://bit.ly/2QXDq9H via IFTTT

20 Jan 19
The Ayr Up There

Hair – Doux – Lia @Mainstore Outfit – Osmia – Evelyn Jumpsuit *NEW* *Avail. 1/20* @Soiree Heels – Empire – Kanaio @Mainstore Lashes – Clockhaus – Diamond Eyelashes *NEW* @Gloss Eyeshadow – Avenge – Desert *NEW* @Gloss Necklace – 7; – Pistol @Mainstore Gum – Lelutka – Gum Gum Boom @Mainstore Purse – 7; – […]

20 Jan 19
Nijeta Ankh • Art•Metaphysics•Culture

Peace Family! If you had a chance to read “Surviving the Nation of Islam (N.O.I) ” parts 1,2,and 3, you are an excellent reader and must share an intrest in exuming the truth on this matter. Even if it’s looking at the uncomfortable truth! I appreciate you. Now let’s conclude this writing which is a […]

20 Jan 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1575631-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1575631-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1575631-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1575631-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Michael Russell with his mother, Jill Drysdale, at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell with his mother, Jill Drysdale, at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell with his mother, Jill Drysdale, hold the letter from Nevada Department of Corrections that began Michael’s employment at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell, with his mother, Jill Drysdale, hold the letter from Nevada Department of Corrections that began Michael’s employment at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell plays with his great nephew Cameron Gonzales, 2, and great niece Ava Gonzales, 11 months, at his home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell plays with his great nephew Cameron Gonzales, 2, and great niece Ava Gonzales, 11 months, near his niece Ashley Gonzales, at his home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell plays with his great nice Ava Gonzales, 11 months, at his home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Posters on the wall of the classroom at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. In August 2018, Michael Russell was hired by NDOC full-time. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Posters on the wall of the classroom at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. In August of 2018, Michael Russell was hired by NDOC full-time. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Inmate Yesenia La Rue asks a question during Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell stands by inmates Carrie Kincaid and Andrew Morris as he leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell, right, poses with his older sisters Lisa, left, and Julie, center, in their Halloween costumes in an undated photo. (Russell family) Michael Russell poses for a photo with his coloring book in an undated photo. (Russell family) Michael Russell, center left, and his older sisters, Lisa, left, and Julie, center right, pose with their father Kevin Russell, far right, in an undated photo. (Russell family) The letter came on June 20, an abnormally hot day in the valley, even by Las Vegas standards. Michael Russell, 39, had been out of prison and sober for about four years. In that time, he had graduated from Hope for Prisoners, earned an associate’s degree and was working as a licensed drug and alcohol counselor for Freedom House, a transitional housing center for addicts. Standing in the middle of the airy living room of his newly remodeled ranch-style home that scorching day, Russell, who has a large tattoo that snakes down his left arm, remembers hesitating for a moment before unfolding the letter. His mother, holding her breath, watched from behind. “Dear Mr. Russell: Congratulations, you have been selected for appointment as a Program Officer 1 with the Nevada Department of Corrections Re-Entry Department,” the letter stated in part. Russell said nothing and then dropped to his knees. He was sobbing and gasping for air. His past makes such an outcome seem nearly unthinkable. Russell had completed three stints in California and Nevada prisons before he was 35, unaware that later in life he’d one day make history as the first convicted felon to be employed with the state Department of Corrections. Jill Drysdale joined him on the soft rug and finished reading the letter aloud to her only son — the son she had never given up on, no matter how many times he took money from her purse or how long he’d gone in the past without contacting her. ”I loved him when he was high. I loved him when he was doing stupid stuff. I loved him when he was coming down. I loved him when he was committing crimes,” she said this month, curled up on a brown sectional couch in the living room where they’d opened the letter together more than half a year ago. “I love my son. There’s no changing that. I just knew I had to be there for him all the time.” Russell wasn’t even old enough to buy a legal drink the first time he was arrested, but the trouble really began years earlier on the night of Dec. 18, 1993. He was just 15. He remembers everything about that night. How his palms hadn’t stopped sweating since he first picked up the clunky house phone to dial 9-1-1 and how he wiped them against his shirt as he paced in front of his family’s small, three-bedroom apartment waiting for help. Russell could hear his mom inside begging his dad to wake up. His father’s face had turned an alarming shade of blue. No one at the time could have predicted the impact Kevin Russell’s death at 39 would have on his son, whom he had raised as his own since he was 2, even insisting that the two share his last name. “To me, it was an amazing thing that a man who wasn’t my biological father was willing to treat me as his own,” Russell said in an interview this month. Russell spent almost every day that followed, until 2014, in some sort of a daze, searching, at almost any cost, for the peace that washed over him when he was high on methamphetamine. ‘History in the making’ Now the same age as his father when he died, Russell works full time at Casa Grande Transitional Housing, a facility that houses nonviolent, non-sex crime inmates who are within 18 months of their parole eligibility date. There, he teaches two classes to inmates — some with whom he had been incarcerated at High Desert State Prison in Indian Springs during his most recent stint in 2014 on a parole violation. He had tested positive on multiple drug screenings. “I never thought in a million years that I would ever want to work in a prison,” Russell said this month, sitting in his office at Casa Grande. “There are days that I come to work and I think, ‘Is this a dream?’” His boss, Elizabeth Dixon-Coleman, said Russell’s employment brings a long-needed change to the culture of the Department of Corrections. “It’s history in the making,” she said. “We’re working toward being more rehabilitative and giving people more opportunities.” That change started with Russell, who came to NDOC in 2017, first as a volunteer and then a contract worker for just under half a year before he was hired full time. “He was willing to say, ‘I’ll do whatever it takes to be the first one, to set the precedence and to be that forerunner to help charge change, even though I’m putting myself out there,’” Dixon-Coleman said. Russell remains on probation to date as the attorney’s general office reviews changes to state agency statutes that currently “talk about cautionary concerns hiring felons, especially because we’re in law enforcement,” according to Dixon-Coleman. “There were several statutes within NDOC, as well as law enforcement compliance and operational procedures, that are now under review for specific wording, or to see if we need to go forward with any legislative action to help ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity for employment in the future while still preserving confidentiality in a way to protect everyone,” she said. Sharing lessons learned There are days still, Russell said, that his insecurities overwhelm him. He wonders if it all will be ripped away from him — his fulfilling career, health insurance and a pension. But teaching chips away at those insecurities. When Russell gets in front of a classroom, he stands a little taller and makes direct eye contact with his students. On a recent Wednesday evening, Russell hushed the 12 inmates chatting in his classroom at Casa Grande. The desks were set up in a rectangular shape, so that the inmates and Russell were facing one another. That night in particular, Russell was teaching Moral Recognition Therapy, a 16-step behavioral modification course. He credits this program as the catalyst for change in his life during his last prison stint. “Who’s ready to present?” Russell announced, looking around the room. Joseph DeVera, wearing a matching set of heather-gray sweats, raised his hand. “Step 2 is all about trust,” DeVera read from his workbook. But while presenting his homework, he caught an error in his work. He tilted his head and squinted his eyes. “I was going to try to spin this, but I can’t,” DeVera admitted. The other inmates came to his defense, urging Russell to allow DeVera to move on to Step 3. But DeVera shook his head, knowing Russell would make him try again the next week. “If I let you slide on that, what else will you slide on in life?” Russell asked, a smile rising from the corners of his mouth. If his dad could see him now, he’d be so proud. Russell’s sure of it. Contact Rio Lacanlale at rlacanlale@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0381. Follow @riolacanlale on Twitter.
20 Jan 19
Y'all know I write ,right?

“….And thou I walk in the valley of the shadow of death I shall fear no evil. We must also feel the same when dealing with those devils. We must put all our faith into GAWD” “yes pastor” “Preach Brother “ “We need to not be like that white man who decides to try to […]

20 Jan 19
Old Darlings

We are now almost a month into 2019. The new year is always full of promise, new beginnings, (mostly) healthy habits, and to our dismay the gym is a little more crowded. We all love a fresh start – but I’m finding myself reflecting on all that I’ve taken for granted while growing up. More […]

20 Jan 19
The Trumpet Blast

In this post I’m going to be covering a less known biblical holiday.  It’s called  Tu B’Shevat.  This holiday will occur on January 21, 2019.   It will also coincide with a total lunar eclipse, and a super moon.  It is not one of the major Feasts of the Lord mentioned in Leviticus 23.   It is not […]

20 Jan 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1577296-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1577296-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1577296-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1577296-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Michael Russell with his mother, Jill Drysdale, at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell with his mother, Jill Drysdale, at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell with his mother, Jill Drysdale, hold the letter from Nevada Department of Corrections that began Michael’s employment at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell, with his mother, Jill Drysdale, hold the letter from Nevada Department of Corrections that began Michael’s employment at their home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell plays with his great nephew Cameron Gonzales, 2, and great niece Ava Gonzales, 11 months, at his home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell plays with his great nephew Cameron Gonzales, 2, and great niece Ava Gonzales, 11 months, near his niece Ashley Gonzales, at his home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell plays with his great nice Ava Gonzales, 11 months, at his home in Las Vegas, Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. When Michael was young, his father died, pushing his already rebellious streak into drug addiction and crime. After years of stints in prison and rehab programs, he made a choice to reform his life for good. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Posters on the wall of the classroom at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. In August 2018, Michael Russell was hired by NDOC full-time. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Posters on the wall of the classroom at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. In August of 2018, Michael Russell was hired by NDOC full-time. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Inmate Yesenia La Rue asks a question during Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell stands by inmates Carrie Kincaid and Andrew Morris as he leads a Moral Recognition Therapy class at Casa Grande, a transitional housing facility run by the Nevada Department of Corrections, in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (Rachel Aston/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @rookie__rae Michael Russell, right, poses with his older sisters Lisa, left, and Julie, center, in their Halloween costumes in an undated photo. (Russell family) Michael Russell poses for a photo with his coloring book in an undated photo. (Russell family) Michael Russell, center left, and his older sisters, Lisa, left, and Julie, center right, pose with their father Kevin Russell, far right, in an undated photo. (Russell family) The letter came on June 20, an abnormally hot day in the valley, even by Las Vegas standards. Michael Russell, 39, had been out of prison and sober for about four years. In that time, he had graduated from Hope for Prisoners, earned an associate’s degree and was working as a licensed drug and alcohol counselor for Freedom House, a transitional housing center for addicts. Standing in the middle of the airy living room of his newly remodeled ranch-style home that scorching day, Russell, who has a large tattoo that snakes down his left arm, remembers hesitating for a moment before unfolding the letter. His mother, holding her breath, watched from behind. “Dear Mr. Russell: Congratulations, you have been selected for appointment as a Program Officer 1 with the Nevada Department of Corrections Re-Entry Department,” the letter stated in part. Russell said nothing and then dropped to his knees. He was sobbing and gasping for air. His past makes such an outcome seem nearly unthinkable. Russell had completed three stints in California and Nevada prisons before he was 35, unaware that later in life he’d one day make history as the first convicted felon to be employed with the state Department of Corrections. Jill Drysdale joined him on the soft rug and finished reading the letter aloud to her only son — the son she had never given up on, no matter how many times he took money from her purse or how long he’d gone in the past without contacting her. ”I loved him when he was high. I loved him when he was doing stupid stuff. I loved him when he was coming down. I loved him when he was committing crimes,” she said this month, curled up on a brown sectional couch in the living room where they’d opened the letter together more than half a year ago. “I love my son. There’s no changing that. I just knew I had to be there for him all the time.” Russell wasn’t even old enough to buy a legal drink the first time he was arrested, but the trouble really began years earlier on the night of Dec. 18, 1993. He was just 15. He remembers everything about that night. How his palms hadn’t stopped sweating since he first picked up the clunky house phone to dial 9-1-1 and how he wiped them against his shirt as he paced in front of his family’s small, three-bedroom apartment waiting for help. Russell could hear his mom inside begging his dad to wake up. His father’s face had turned an alarming shade of blue. No one at the time could have predicted the impact Kevin Russell’s death at 39 would have on his son, whom he had raised as his own since he was 2, even insisting that the two share his last name. “To me, it was an amazing thing that a man who wasn’t my biological father was willing to treat me as his own,” Russell said in an interview this month. Russell spent almost every day that followed, until 2014, in some sort of a daze, searching, at almost any cost, for the peace that washed over him when he was high on methamphetamine. ‘History in the making’ Now the same age as his father when he died, Russell works full time at Casa Grande Transitional Housing, a facility that houses nonviolent, non-sex crime inmates who are within 18 months of their parole eligibility date. There, he teaches two classes to inmates — some with whom he had been incarcerated at High Desert State Prison in Indian Springs during his most recent stint in 2014 on a parole violation. He had tested positive on multiple drug screenings. “I never thought in a million years that I would ever want to work in a prison,” Russell said this month, sitting in his office at Casa Grande. “There are days that I come to work and I think, ‘Is this a dream?’” His boss, Elizabeth Dixon-Coleman, said Russell’s employment brings a long-needed change to the culture of the Department of Corrections. “It’s history in the making,” she said. “We’re working toward being more rehabilitative and giving people more opportunities.” That change started with Russell, who came to NDOC in 2017, first as a volunteer and then a contract worker for just under half a year before he was hired full time. “He was willing to say, ‘I’ll do whatever it takes to be the first one, to set the precedence and to be that forerunner to help charge change, even though I’m putting myself out there,’” Dixon-Coleman said. Russell remains on probation to date as the attorney’s general office reviews changes to state agency statutes that currently “talk about cautionary concerns hiring felons, especially because we’re in law enforcement,” according to Dixon-Coleman. “There were several statutes within NDOC, as well as law enforcement compliance and operational procedures, that are now under review for specific wording, or to see if we need to go forward with any legislative action to help ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity for employment in the future while still preserving confidentiality in a way to protect everyone,” she said. Sharing lessons learned There are days still, Russell said, that his insecurities overwhelm him. He wonders if it all will be ripped away from him — his fulfilling career, health insurance and a pension. But teaching chips away at those insecurities. When Russell gets in front of a classroom, he stands a little taller and makes direct eye contact with his students. On a recent Wednesday evening, Russell hushed the 12 inmates chatting in his classroom at Casa Grande. The desks were set up in a rectangular shape, so that the inmates and Russell were facing one another. That night in particular, Russell was teaching Moral Recognition Therapy, a 16-step behavioral modification course. He credits this program as the catalyst for change in his life during his last prison stint. “Who’s ready to present?” Russell announced, looking around the room. Joseph DeVera, wearing a matching set of heather-gray sweats, raised his hand. “Step 2 is all about trust,” DeVera read from his workbook. But while presenting his homework, he caught an error in his work. He tilted his head and squinted his eyes. “I was going to try to spin this, but I can’t,” DeVera admitted. The other inmates came to his defense, urging Russell to allow DeVera to move on to Step 3. But DeVera shook his head, knowing Russell would make him try again the next week. “If I let you slide on that, what else will you slide on in life?” Russell asked, a smile rising from the corners of his mouth. If his dad could see him now, he’d be so proud. Russell’s sure of it. Contact Rio Lacanlale at rlacanlale@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0381. Follow @riolacanlale on Twitter.
20 Jan 19
Krystal

Phil Mickelson held on to his lead in the Desert Classic on Saturday by being, well, Phil Mickelson. He sprayed his tee shots at the difficult Stadium Course at PGA West into areas that were more suited to roadrunners and other desert creatures, then recovered as only Mickelson seems to do to shoot… from latimes.com […]