Designers Guild

14 Dec 18
Knitting Guild of the Desert - Promoting the craft of Knitting

Cecilia Campochiaro, author of Sequence Knitting, will be a guest speaker in January 7-8, 2019 and will conduct a 1 1/2 day workshop. The stash sale will be in February and the Fashion Show will be in March. Donations for the stash sale can be dropped of at the meeting. Community knitting: Completed blankets made […]

13 Dec 18
National Coffee Association Blog

Choosing the right words is key to communicating specialty coffee quality to potential buyers, for both green and roasted coffee.

13 Dec 18
renatanakiyemba

We are going in for second semester of second year and am a GRC aspirant. GRC stands for Guild representive council. I started thinking about this just months back that sometimes I feel I don’t want it too much, but I really want it more each day…hope that makes sense. I mean, the closer I […]

13 Dec 18
IndySligo Gaming

Today, after linking to my blog on Facebook, I went back and re-read the series of posts from 2017 about my homebrew setting, Neuith. It’s no surprise I’ve made some changes since then, but what is surprising is how much in some areas yet how little in others. Since those were written, the first two […]

13 Dec 18
Barum Curator

One of our tasks at the Museum is to show off the products and creativity of North Devon people, and to inspire young people now to go out into the world and create wonderful things like the pottery and furniture created at Brannams and Shaplands in the past.  In our new extension we will be […]

13 Dec 18
the wonderful world of veena

we began our incredible european adventure in budapest, a city that will forever be special to all of us. we spent two-and-a-half days wandering streets, climbing hills, soaking in baths, traversing bridges, and stuffing ourselves with delicious food and drink. below is our itinerary, where we stayed, and some of our tips, if you’d like […]

13 Dec 18
Robyn Parfitt///Artist Designer Maker

Links: https://numacrafts.wixsite.com/website http://www.facebook.com/numacrafts http://www.instagram.com/numacrafts For the first week, we had MYOB summed up and what to expect over the next coming weeks. We also had the initial first team meeting and greeting. Explaining each of our strengths & weaknesses. We are also the only group of 4 in the 8 teams. Here is what was […]

13 Dec 18
Allium Interiors

Established in 2000, Allium is a Designers Guild concept store offering home and lifestyle solutions and luxury home interior design Auckland wide. Allium is Auckland’s premium stockist of the latest European, American, Australian and NZ furnishing fabrics, wallpapers, bed linen, furniture and home decor accessories. Allium Interiors is owned by Suzanne Barber and Jo Burrell, […]

12 Dec 18

Lindsey O’Connor (Stage Manager) is a sophomore General Theatre Major, English Minor, and Secondary Education Minor. Lindsey has worked on multiple shows at Carthage including assistant stage managing INTO THE WOODS and A SEAT AT THE TABLE when Carthage took it to the American College Theatre Festival. She has done backstage work for Carthage’s productions […]

12 Dec 18
Eric Watson

Over 60 magical items designed specifically for spellcasting classes, as well as a guide to make your own magic focuses.

12 Dec 18
STUFA A PELLET

Verona Tourist Guide Book a guided tour in Verona: The Arena of Verona. V erona is famous all over the world as the city of Romeo and Juliet. The visit to the famous balcony can also become an opportunity to discover other things to see in Verona: art, history, music, theater, great wines, traditional cuisine […]

12 Dec 18
Robb Report UK
East London is once again the hottest part of town. Yes, fashion is capricious, and urban hotspots fall in and out of favour on a whim. But if Mayfair and the West End were once the places to head for eye-catching new hotel openings, right now some of the most luxurious, creative and cool venues are to be found in and around the City – the fastest-growing zone in the capital. With the evolution of the banking district into a tech hub, plus the knock-on effects of the 2012 Olympics, the City’s regeneration continues apace: by 2030, it’s predicted more 125,000 jobs will have been created. It’s a place where market traders rub shoulders with urban hipsters and Christopher Wren’s skyline icons jostle for space with shiny skyscrapers; where state-of-the-art private members clubs such as Ten Trinity Square and the M Den in Threadneedle Street are springing up daily; and where Shoreditch House (that little slice of Manhattan’s meatpacking district in E1) moves over for the new kids on the block like The Ned, a £200 million art deco-inflected hotel set in a Grade I listed building opposite the Bank of England. And with the closer proximity to City Airport making the draw east even stronger, here are three beacons of hospitality to look forward to, all set to open later this year.   THE VINTRY & MERCER HOTEL There’s a link between The Vintry & Mercer Hotel (vintryandmercer.com), pictured above, inspired by two of the City’s historic trading guilds, and a cornerstone of English literature. During the 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer was raised in the area the hotel is located in, near Upper Thames Street, in a district known as the Vintry (his father and grandfather were both vintners). Expect a wine list here that reflects the site’s history. The other half of its name pays homage to the Mercer Guild, established in 1304, which traded in fine fabrics (and, aptly enough, this place will be fitted out to in the finest velvet, leather and other luxurious textiles). Located near The Shard and the 17th-century St James’ Church, this solar-panelled, eco-friendly hub of understated luxury aims to connect guests to the City’s past with the delights of the present-day capital (“a place where thriving modern businesses blend with London’s colourful trading past,” as hotel director Anton Fedun puts it), and historic links will be found everywhere: from the menus to the old trading maps found throughout the hallways, dining spaces, and 92 bespoke and intimate doubles and suites, with their glass-panelled balconies affording evocative views of the Southbank skyline. Three distinct dining destinations will include the elegantly relaxed restaurant Vintry Kitchen; the Mercer Roof Terrace, offering a British menu (and views of St Paul’s Cathedral); and a 1920s-style underground speakeasy called ‘DND’ (aka Do Not Disturb). A gym and three private event spaces, with capacity for up to 28 guests, are also on offer. Beyond the hotel’s doors, guests will find a wealth of history, ancient and recent, with Shakespeare’s Globe, The Barbican Centre and Tate Modern, along with traditional street markets, fine restaurants and designer boutiques, all in the vicinity. This is one seriously well-placed hotel, in terms of getting around – just a couple of minutes’ walk from Cannon Street tube, and a 20 minute-ride to St Pancras International and the Eurostar, plus eight miles from London City Airport. The hotel is due to open this spring. The Vintry & Mercer Hotel HOTEL INDIGO “How many saucy airs we meet from Temple Bar to Aldgate Street,” wrote 18th-century poet John Gay about the area boutique luxury brand, Indigo, has chosen for their latest addition to the family. And while the area is still home to ‘saucy airs’, these might today be Silicon Roundabout hipsters or jet-setting financiers. The area is unique, as it sits on the border between two very different Londons – the fast finance of the City and the slick, hip Shoreditch. One thing that doesn’t change is its history. Aldgate is steeped in it. It cloaks you, sweeping you back through the centuries, past the starting point of the Great Fire of London (Pudding Lane) to its mythical home of Jack the Ripper and the zone’s notoriety for former slums. One constant, though, has always been its role as a hub for different cultures and edgy creativity. Hotel Indigo Aldgate (ihg.com/hotelindigo) is situated beside Whitechapel Gallery – the first to show Jackson Pollock, David Hockney and local residents Gilbert & George. Just a dandy’s stroll away is Spitalfields – now a bustling independent retail and restaurant emporium, the former 12th century priory was, for centuries, a refuge for the creative and the curious. The Hugenots fleeing France came here (don’t miss the immersive Denis Severs House tour in Fournier Street), Irish weavers arrived soon after, Jews fleeing Poland and Russia came in the 19th century and the Bangladeshi community made it their home in the 1970s, bringing with them the best curries (hence Brick Lane’s reputation) in London. Indigo’s decor takes its cues from this history – interior designer Dexter Moren Associates (The Great Northern Hotel, The Shangri-La) has combined Huguenot Weaver style with Shoreditch edginess and added a dollop of City slickness to create a unique and luxurious experience that reflects the area’s past. The hotel’s 212 rooms will include several deluxe rooms and top floor suites. “The story of Aldgate East is of two worlds colliding – the bearded, tattooed hipsters of Shoreditch and the straight-laced ‘suits’ of the City,” explains design and innovation director Henry Reeve. “We wanted to make a space where both could feel comfortable. I hope to see hipsters rock up on a bike, grab an almond-milk flat white and sit down next to business people finishing a deal over a dry martini.” Hotel Indigo, Aldgate THE DIXON What does the name Tooley Street mean to you? If you’re of a certain generation, it might prick memories of a terrifying tourist destination featuring tableaus from Britain’s gory past, The London Dungeon, formerly a wine cellar and since relocated to County Hall. Those with an interest in London architecture might also know the name of one John Dixon Butler, appointed Surveyor and Architect to the Metropolitan Police. Among his 200 designs are the former, Edwardian baroque-style Old Street Magistrates Court and Police Station, Clerkenwell Magistrates’ Court, Bow Road Police Station (where suffragette Sylvia Pankhurst was held in 1913 following her arrest for smashing windows) and the old Tower Bridge Magistrates’ Court and Police Station constructed in 1905. Taking its name from its creator, The Dixon (thedixon.co.uk) is a conversion of that original Grade II listed building into a beautiful boutique-style hotel, due to open its doors this autumn. Part of Autograph Collection Hotels, the Dixon aims to be a new cultural hub for local artisans, focusing on representing local talent “from emerging artists to established producers”. Each of its 193 rooms, including nine spacious suites, will house furniture by British designers and traditional art alongside contemporary paintings and other works from local galleries. The hotel’s Cultural Committee is also ensuring guests have special access to local theatres and studios in the vicinity. While Consarc Design Group is in charge of the architectural restoration, Twenty2degrees Design Partnership have applied their trademark modern but playful edge to the interiors and the refurbishment. Amid the original Georgian oak panelling are reclaimed pieces of furniture from the old Courthouse. The rooms will also combine natural light with up-to-the-minute tech, including complimentary ultra-fast wi-fi and smart TVs.   The Dixon  
12 Dec 18
GeekandGear.com

posted on 2018-12-12 00:25 EST by Rafael Antonio Pineda THE RAMPAGE from EXILE TRIBE, EMPiRE debut songs on January 13 The official website for the Fairy Tail anime revealed the new theme songs for the anime on Monday. THE RAMPAGE from EXILE TRIBE will perform the new opening song “DOWN BY LAW,” while EMPiRE will […]

12 Dec 18
Deadline

The Motion Picture & Television Fund’s VA Benefits Assistance Program has helped Hollywood’s military veterans and their families collect more than $500,000 in unclaimed retroactive Veterans Affairs benefits over the last five years — and more than $85,000 in ongoing monthly benefits, all tax free for life. On Saturday, the MPTF will hold its 2nd […]

11 Dec 18
Chico Enterprise-Record
It’s the season of Tidings of Comfort and Joy and Gingerbread. Authentic, unpretentious, neighborly and comforting, gingerbread is perfect for modest but heartfelt celebrations like Christmas after the Camp Fire. A legacy from Europe, gingerbread “arrived in the New World with English colonists. The cookies were sometimes used to sway Virginia voters to favor one candidate over another,” according to Tori Avey on her blog, “The History Kitchen.” The first American cookbook, “American Cookery” by Amelia Simmons, has recipes for three types of gingerbread including the soft variety baked in loaves: Soft gingerbread to be baked in pans. No. 2. Rub three pounds of sugar, two pounds of butter, into four pounds of flour, add 20 eggs, 4 ounces ginger, 4 spoons rosewater, bake as No. 1. “This softer version of gingerbread was more common in America. George Washington’s mother, Mary Ball Washington, served her recipe for gingerbread to the Marquis de Lafayette when he visited her Fredericksburg, Virginia home. Since then it was known as Gingerbread Lafayette.” In our kitchen there’s the Tuesday night gingerbread in-a-box that you mix and bake in a brownie pan and serve warm with powdered sugar dusted over your kid’s hands to make a special design; there’s the smoldering, spicy dark adult gingerbread you dress up with extravagant dollops of freshly whipped cream and garnish with crystallized ginger, and there’s the gingerbread-style honey-spice cookies you pipe with royal icing for Christmas. I’ll leave the gingerbread house variety for another time. This recipe is for the richly spicy, smoldering even, gingerbread you make for celebrations. As I splurged on a 750 of Lagunitas Stout when the recipe only called for a cup, my friendly liquor vendor suggested buying some very good vanilla ice cream and pouring the extra stout over it for a “Stout Float”, which actually sounds good. Onward. Grammercy Tavern gingerbread I chose this recipe from New York’s beloved Grammercy Tavern for its rave reviews and because it used more ginger than any other recipe I found. More is better, right? I followed it exactly and it rewarded me with gingerbread perfection. I’m going to serve it with lavish dollops of freshly whipped cream and a garnish of crystallized ginger. Ingredients: 1 cup oatmeal stout or Guinness Stout 1 cup dark molasses (not blackstrap) 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 2 Tablespoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg pinch of ground cardamom 3 large eggs 1 cup packed dark brown sugar 1 cup granulated sugar (I only used a ½ cup) 3/4 cup vegetable oil confectioners’ sugar for dusting Preparation: Preheat oven to 350F. Generously butter/flour a 10-12 cup Bundt pan, knocking out excess flour. Bring stout and molasses to a boil in a large saucepan and remove from heat. Whisk in baking soda, then cool to room temperature. Sift together flour, baking powder, and spices in a large bowl. Whisk together eggs and sugars. Whisk in oil, then molasses mixture. Add to flour mixture and whisk until just combined. Pour batter into Bundt pan and rap pan sharply on counter to eliminate air bubbles. Bake in the middle of oven until a tester comes out with just a few moist crumbs, about 50 minutes. Cool cake in pan on a rack 5 minutes. Turn out onto rack and cool completely. Serve cake dusted with confectioner’s sugar, or with whipped cream. NOTE: If you have a Bundt pan that tends to stick, melt 2 Tablespoons of unsalted butter in the microwave and using a pastry brush, generously brush the interior of your pan with melted butter. Dust completely with flour and tap out the excess. Nut Tree honey cookies with decorative icing As a child I loved the brightly colored, graphic Nut Tree honey cookies, and was delighted to find the recipe online. They are the culmination of a long history of gingerbread-style cookies that enjoyed a heyday during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Aimee Lee Ball in “Eat, Darling, Eat,” writes, “Fairs in medieval France and England offered ginger-flavored sweet treats called fairings, according to the ‘Oxford Companion to Food.’ Knights received a piece for good luck in tournaments. “Legend traces gingerbread men back to Queen Elizabeth I, who supposedly had her cooks mold the pastry into the shapes of her favorite courtiers and liked to give VIP guests ginger “biscuits” that were edible caricatures. Around the same time, there was a belief that if a woman ate a “gingerbread husband” it might lead to her marriage. “One theory holds that since the “men” are really more toddler-shaped than adult, they came to represent the baby Jesus at Christmas. And the spices involved are sometimes thought to represent the exotic gifts of the Magi. “In Germany, gingerbread cookies called lebkuchen were heart-shaped and decorated with romantic messages. The city of Nuremberg became known as the ‘gingerbread capital of the world’ in the 1600s, with master bakers creating elaborate works of art. (There was a guild with strict regulations. Only those who owned their own “smoke,” meaning an oven, could sell gingerbread.) “The oldest recorded gingerbread recipe, dating to the 16th century, is kept in the Germanic National Museum in Nuremberg. Gingerbread from that city has ‘protected geographical indication’ from the European Union, like Parmigiano-Reggiano and champagne.” The Nut Tree cookies stayed moist and edible for weeks, months even, either due to the recipe, the protective armor of frosting or the tight seal of saran wrap which welded the cookie to its cardboard backing. For those of us that enjoyed looking at the cookie a long time before eating it, this was a godsend. The frosting, as I remember was like a hard shell, and I prefer my friend Joni German’s Royal Icing for cookies you plan to eat right away. Source: “Nut Tree Remembered: The Cookbook” by Tara Baumann, Jim Moehrke, Roy Moehrke, 1997 (Vacaville Museum, CA – ordering info: 707-447-4513) Nut Tree designer Don Birrell shared this family recipe with the Nut Tree. These artfully decorated honey cookies quickly became a Nut Tree signature item, almost too lovely to eat. Makes about 2 dozen Ingredients: 2/3 cup dark honey 1 cup sugar 1/3 cup shortening 1 egg 1/3 cup water 4 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon cloves Decorative icing: 3 egg whites, room temperature (pasteurized egg whites) 1 pound powdered sugar 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar food coloring, optional Directions: Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Bring to a boil sugar, honey and shortening. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Allow to cool. Beat egg and add to water. Mix and sift the flour, soda, salt and spices. Add the sifted dry ingredients alternately with the liquid ingredients to the honey mixture. If the dough is allowed to ripen for several days before rolling out, the flavor and texture are somewhat improved. Roll out dough about 1/4-inch thick and cut. Bake at 325 degrees until edges are golden brown. Decorative icing: Place all icing ingredients in mixing bowl and mix with electric beater for about 10 minutes. After mixing, be sure to keep bowl covered with a damp cloth at all times; icing dries quickly and hard. If you wish, add food coloring to make colored lines. For decorating cookies: Fill pastry or paper frosting cone with icing, up to about 1/2 inch below the top. Fold the paper down over the icing and cut 1/8 inch off tip of the cone. Squeeze icing through the hole in the tip with one hand while holding top closed with other hand. It takes a little practice. A paper pattern, punched with pinholes for outlines, placed over the cookie and lightly dusted with powdered sugar makes decorating easier. Joni German’s Royal Icing: 3 Tablespoons meringue powder ½ teaspoon lemon juice ¼ cup warm water Directions: Stir together and let sit 15 minutes. Add to 1 pound sifted powdered sugar. Beat on medium speed for 7 minutes. This recipe produces a stiff icing, perfect for piping on designs. To make an icing that will “flow” over the cookie, creating a hard, smooth surface, place 1 cup of the above recipe in a mixing bowl and add 2½ Tablespoons of water. Stir until completely smooth If you are lucky enough to have a kitchen this year, light the oven and bake some fragrant gingerbread, even the boxed kind will do. It will make your house smell welcoming and lovely — like home.
12 Dec 18
Lewes FC progcast

Bostik Premier League, 12th December 2018

11 Dec 18
Good Nerd, Bad Nerd

The Lightpower Collection to Showcase Rock ‘n’ Roll’s Defining Moments from Legendary Photographer Neal Preston at The 2019 NAMM Show -Proceeds from sales of Preston’s prints, books to benefit Behind The Scenes and NAMM Foundation charities-   CARLSBAD, Calif.– December 11, 2018 – Famed rock ‘n’ roll photographer and author Neal Preston has spent decades […]