Documentary

24 May 19
Business Management

As mentioned, the soundtrack to Andrew Slater’s documentary Echo in the Canyon, which looks at the birth of the Laurel Canyon music scene with bands like The Byrds, The Beach Boys, Buffalo Springfield, and The Mamas & the Papas, and more, comes out today. Continue reading… Fiona Apple, Neil Young & more do covers for […]

24 May 19
Business Management

As mentioned, the soundtrack to Andrew Slater’s documentary Echo in the Canyon, which looks at the birth of the Laurel Canyon music scene with bands like The Byrds, The Beach Boys, Buffalo Springfield, and The Mamas & the Papas, and more, comes out today. Continue reading… Fiona Apple, Neil Young & more do covers for […]

24 May 19
Everything Horror - Official Podcast Website

From the creators of the “On the Trail of Bigfoot”, here comes an evidence based 68 minutes long documentary called ‘Terror in the Skies‘, releasing on June 7th, 2019 on DVD & Vimeo Digital On Demand Video, which tells us about the history & documentations by dozens of witnesses about various sightings related to the […]

24 May 19
I-Ying Liu

English translation published on Taiwan Film Festival UK & Nordic Countries. At the award ceremony of the 55th Taipei Golden Horse Film Festival (TGHFF) on 17th November 2018, Taiwanese filmmaker Fu Yue, winner of the best documentary award with her work Our Youth in Taiwan, walked on the stage. In the last part of her […]

24 May 19
East Bay Times
In the heart of Silicon Valley and shadow of Stanford University, the most coveted edition of Palo Alto High School’s student newspaper has long been the May issue mapping graduating seniors’ college destinations. Harvard. Yale. Georgetown. Dartmouth. And, of course, Stanford. Not anymore. The student newspaper‘s top editors decided to scrap the who’s-going-where college map amid growing worries it was feeding an unhealthy culture obsessed with success. The decision followed the nationwide scandal of rich parents paying to bribe and cheat their progeny into marquee universities — implicating a Stanford coach and more than a dozen Bay Area parents, including two from Palo Alto. While acknowledging the map aimed to celebrate college-bound seniors’ achievements, editors Ethan Nissim, Kaylie Nguyen, Ujwal Srivastava, Waverly Long and Leyton Ho wrote jointly that “the reality is the map contributes to the toxic, comparison-driven culture at Paly.” At a time of rising anxiety over access to college and its promise of economic security, The Campanile’s editors are among a small but growing number of students pushing back against what they feel is relentless pressure to pursue conventional markers of success. Student editors at other schools from Silicon Valley to the Midwest that had similar college map traditions have taken similar steps in recent years: Palo Alto’s Gunn High School in 2015, San Jose’s Harker School in 2016 and the University of Chicago Laboratory High School this year. The Chicago student editors also cited the college admissions scandal as a tipping point in the decision, arguing the college placement list “too often becomes a type of scorecard” that “facilitates comparisons of students to one another on the basis of college name alone.” Teachers, advisers and administrators stressed in each case the students were the ones who made the decisions to eliminate the college-focused features — with the adults’ full support. “I have long-questioned the intent behind publications of college destinations,” said Palo Alto Unified School District Superintendent Donald B. Austin, who started his own collegiate path at Chula Vista’s Southwestern Community College. “Too much attention is given to the name of the school on a sweatshirt.” PALO ALTO, CA – MAY 23: Editors of Palo Alto High School’s student newspaper (left to right) Ethan Nissim, Kaylie Nguyen, Waverly Long and Ujwal Srivastava, chose to not include the traditional mapping of graduating seniors’ college destinations in their final edition. They were photographed, Wednesday, May 22, 2019, looking at the difference between last year this year’s editions in Palo Alto, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group) Palo Alto students grow up surrounded by success. The town of 65,000 is home to famous technology giants Hewlett-Packard and Tesla. Eight out of 10 residents older than 25 are college graduates, the median annual income — $137,000 a year — is more than twice the national average and the median home is valued at more than $1.7 million. Palo Alto High students study across the street from Stanford and dodge professors driving $70,000 Tesla electric sedans as they cross the street to a shopping center offering artisan pizza and $13 salads. But fears of fostering a success-obsessed culture are more than philosophical at Palo Alto schools, still grappling with a tragic rash of teen suicides from 2009 to 2015 that became the subject of a 2018 documentary film. In the film, “The Edge of Success,” recent Gunn graduate Olivia Eck complained students who don’t get selected at a top university are “made fun of.” Administrators responded with a host of measures, including changes in schedules, homework loads and adding therapists and a “positive psychology” class. Across the bay at Oakland High School, the student paper publishes outgoing seniors’ remarks on their goals and plans, which sometimes includes where they are going to college. English and journalism teacher Lara Trale said that a toxic comparison-driven culture has “not been a major issue” at the school. Still, she said “there’s definitely that pressure” on students to succeed. One senior at Oakland High who did not want to be named lamented that when students get asked about college plans they are “looked at a different way” if their responses are perceived as insufficiently ambitious. At Palo Alto High, English and journalism teacher Esther Wojcicki — an author whose daughters are Susan Wojcicki, CEO of YouTube, Anne Wojcicki, who started 23andMe, and Janet Wojcicki, an anthropologist and associate professor at UC San Francisco — said the college map had been a long-established tradition when she started at Paly 35 years ago. “Back then, it wasn’t such a big deal,” Wojcicki said. But she and others said that over the years, something changed. Parents would snap up the college map papers and bury their heads in it at graduation ceremonies. “It’s gotten more intense,” Wojcicki said. “People tend to treat their kids like pets in a pet show.” At the student paper, The Campanile, editors in recent years grew increasingly uncomfortable with the college map. A few years ago they rebranded it as “Post-Paly Plans” to include students with “Gap Year” endeavors — work, travel, the Army, a language program in Japan. But they also found a growing number of students simply refusing to disclose their post-graduation plans. Then came the bombshell college admissions scandal. “It was a shock, being so close to home, and how much people cared about a brand name,” Nguyen said. The editors quickly decided to drop “Post-Paly Plans” altogether. Long said, “We all agreed with the detrimental impact that it had.” But they still needed something to fill the page. They decided to let their classmates vent their frustrations with the college competition culture. Ingrid Paixao called it “extremely toxic.” Hanna Corny lamented the “veil of shame on community college that there shouldn’t be.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]The editors said that for the most part, the response from the community in the week since the edition published has been positive. College boasting still seeps out in other ways — a T-shirt day where students wear the shirts of the colleges they were accepted to, or writing their college on their caps at graduation. But, as Srivastava put it, “this is a step we can take in the right direction.”
24 May 19
The Mercury News
In the heart of Silicon Valley and shadow of Stanford University, the most coveted edition of Palo Alto High School’s student newspaper has long been the May issue mapping graduating seniors’ college destinations. Harvard. Yale. Georgetown. Dartmouth. And, of course, Stanford. Not anymore. The student newspaper‘s top editors decided to scrap the who’s-going-where college map amid growing worries it was feeding an unhealthy culture obsessed with success. The decision followed the nationwide scandal of rich parents paying to bribe and cheat their progeny into marquee universities — implicating a Stanford coach and more than a dozen Bay Area parents, including two from Palo Alto. While acknowledging the map aimed to celebrate college-bound seniors’ achievements, editors Ethan Nissim, Kaylie Nguyen, Ujwal Srivastava, Waverly Long and Leyton Ho wrote jointly that “the reality is the map contributes to the toxic, comparison-driven culture at Paly.” At a time of rising anxiety over access to college and its promise of economic security, The Campanile’s editors are among a small but growing number of students pushing back against what they feel is relentless pressure to pursue conventional markers of success. Student editors at other schools from Silicon Valley to the Midwest that had similar college map traditions have taken similar steps in recent years: Palo Alto’s Gunn High School in 2015, San Jose’s Harker School in 2016 and the University of Chicago Laboratory High School this year. The Chicago student editors also cited the college admissions scandal as a tipping point in the decision, arguing the college placement list “too often becomes a type of scorecard” that “facilitates comparisons of students to one another on the basis of college name alone.” Teachers, advisers and administrators stressed in each case the students were the ones who made the decisions to eliminate the college-focused features — with the adults’ full support. “I have long-questioned the intent behind publications of college destinations,” said Palo Alto Unified School District Superintendent Donald B. Austin, who started his own collegiate path at Chula Vista’s Southwestern Community College. “Too much attention is given to the name of the school on a sweatshirt.” PALO ALTO, CA – MAY 23: Editors of Palo Alto High School’s student newspaper (left to right) Ethan Nissim, Kaylie Nguyen, Waverly Long and Ujwal Srivastava, chose to not include the traditional mapping of graduating seniors’ college destinations in their final edition. They were photographed, Wednesday, May 22, 2019, looking at the difference between last year this year’s editions in Palo Alto, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group) Palo Alto students grow up surrounded by success. The town of 65,000 is home to famous technology giants Hewlett-Packard and Tesla. Eight out of 10 residents older than 25 are college graduates, the median annual income — $137,000 a year — is more than twice the national average and the median home is valued at more than $1.7 million. Palo Alto High students study across the street from Stanford and dodge professors driving $70,000 Tesla electric sedans as they cross the street to a shopping center offering artisan pizza and $13 salads. But fears of fostering a success-obsessed culture are more than philosophical at Palo Alto schools, still grappling with a tragic rash of teen suicides from 2009 to 2015 that became the subject of a 2018 documentary film. In the film, “The Edge of Success,” recent Gunn graduate Olivia Eck complained students who don’t get selected at a top university are “made fun of.” Administrators responded with a host of measures, including changes in schedules, homework loads and adding therapists and a “positive psychology” class. Across the bay at Oakland High School, the student paper publishes outgoing seniors’ remarks on their goals and plans, which sometimes includes where they are going to college. English and journalism teacher Lara Trale said that a toxic comparison-driven culture has “not been a major issue” at the school. Still, she said “there’s definitely that pressure” on students to succeed. One senior at Oakland High who did not want to be named lamented that when students get asked about college plans they are “looked at a different way” if their responses are perceived as insufficiently ambitious. At Palo Alto High, English and journalism teacher Esther Wojcicki — an author whose daughters are Susan Wojcicki, CEO of YouTube, Anne Wojcicki, who started 23andMe, and Janet Wojcicki, an anthropologist and associate professor at UC San Francisco — said the college map had been a long-established tradition when she started at Paly 35 years ago. “Back then, it wasn’t such a big deal,” Wojcicki said. But she and others said that over the years, something changed. Parents would snap up the college map papers and bury their heads in it at graduation ceremonies. “It’s gotten more intense,” Wojcicki said. “People tend to treat their kids like pets in a pet show.” At the student paper, The Campanile, editors in recent years grew increasingly uncomfortable with the college map. A few years ago they rebranded it as “Post-Paly Plans” to include students with “Gap Year” endeavors — work, travel, the Army, a language program in Japan. But they also found a growing number of students simply refusing to disclose their post-graduation plans. Then came the bombshell college admissions scandal. “It was a shock, being so close to home, and how much people cared about a brand name,” Nguyen said. The editors quickly decided to drop “Post-Paly Plans” altogether. Long said, “We all agreed with the detrimental impact that it had.” But they still needed something to fill the page. They decided to let their classmates vent their frustrations with the college competition culture. Ingrid Paixao called it “extremely toxic.” Hanna Corny lamented the “veil of shame on community college that there shouldn’t be.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]The editors said that for the most part, the response from the community in the week since the edition published has been positive. College boasting still seeps out in other ways — a T-shirt day where students wear the shirts of the colleges they were accepted to, or writing their college on their caps at graduation. But, as Srivastava put it, “this is a step we can take in the right direction.”
24 May 19
Fairy Bread Life

We’re getting an electrician to come in and check out the lights in our bathroom, as they’re basically stuffed. Anyway, I asked him how we can pay him, and he replied back with “finish the operation (under cash)”. I was like what in the world does that mean 😂 But he had the word “cash” […]

24 May 19
Laura Loomer Official

Several months ago, the talented group of individuals at Censored Movie asked Laura Loomer to participate in a full-length cinematic documentary, exploring our right to social media in our modern media-driven society. From Director George Llewelyn-John, the You Can’t Watch This independent documentary explores the effects and efficacy of social media censorship and the implications for Americans’ […]

24 May 19
Davis Alexander Pop Culture Blog

To start off, I will admit that this is the first time ever that I have watched anime and it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be, just being honest. As you know I am not totally into comics or anime, but with that being said I thought that the film Princess Mononoke […]

24 May 19
Consequence of Sound
Geto Boys have canceled their farewell tour, “The Beginning of a Long Goodbye”, less than 24 hours before it was set to launch. Group member Bushwick Bill was diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer earlier this month. Due to the gravity of his medical condition, the Houston hip-hop outfit quickly lined up a short run of concerts set to take place this month. The first was scheduled for Friday night in Pontiac, Michigan. However, now Bill is taking issue with how the tour has been promoted. Per TMZ, the trek has been in the works for some time, even before Bill’s diagnosis, but was originally going to be titled “Bushwick and Friends Tour”. Bill believes the newly renamed “Beginning of a Long Goodbye” makes it sound as though he’s already on his deathbed and that his battle with cancer is being exploited. (Read: The 25 Greatest Hip-Hop Debut Albums) For what it’s worth, Geto Boys’ own Scarface has used the word “farewell” in statements describing the tour, and indicated it would be one of the last few times to see the group together on stage, “I look forward to joining the guys again for this final farewell to The Geto Boys. We had a lot of memories, good and bad, and a lot of great music. Man it’s gonna be a tear jerker walking away from this- a time in my life that threw learning curves and growing pains at the same time.” Although Geto Boys’ tour dates have been scrapped, Bill is currently working on a series of solo projects, including new albums, a book, and a documentary, so that his family will have a sustainable income in the event of his passing. Geto Boys 2019 Tour Dates: 05/24 – Pontiac, MI @ The Crofoot 05/25 – Cleveland, OH @ Agora Theatre 05/29 – Washington, DC @ Howard Theatre 05/30 – New York, NY @ Sony Hall [cos-videojs-footer id=”eminemhighestchartingsongs-1511822680309,nas27top5songs-1529617593231,travisscott27stop5videos-1533853051677,tourstopdrake2cjamesbay2clow-1554498627781,tourstoplimpbizkit2cthreedaysgrace2ceminem-1554498819346″]
24 May 19
I-Ying Liu

English translation published on Taiwan Film Festival UK & Nordic Countries. Taipei Film Festival Once organised by the China Times Group, the inaugural award portion of Taipei Film Festival (hereinafter TFF), China Times Express Film Awards, was held in 1988, the same year as the first issue of the Express was published. After the festival’s […]

24 May 19
The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

The highly-anticipated doc drops June 7 on Netflix and in select theaters.

24 May 19
The Hits Just Keep On Comin'

(Pictured: Ellie Kemper, Marisa Tomei, Woody Harrelson, and Ike Barinholtz as the Stivics and the Bunkers.) This website has a TV category and we use it to deviate from the normal run of stuff around here. This post started as a Twitter thread, but I’ve turned it into a full post, since not everybody who […]

24 May 19
Sadie Janes' Portfolio

The Sault Latin Wave Film Festival took place this weekend for the second time in Sault Ste. Marie. Among the five films that were screened was El Alcalde (The Mayor), a documentary that follows Mexican politician and businessman Mauricio Fernández Garza, and examines the relationship between politics, power and the drug cartels. Director of the […]