Dune

18 Jul 19
Orange County Register
#gallery-6922075-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-6922075-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-6922075-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-6922075-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Kids celebrate with oars in the air as they glide back to shore at the Newport Aquatics Center after paddling from Newport Dunes in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. The kids were taking part in the Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracles for Kids. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Christopher Godoy, left, splashes Emily Bowen, a volunteer team captain, as he jumps off the catamaran during the Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracles for Kids in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Gloria Godoy, 5, gets some help with her life jacket from Emily Bowen, a volunteer team captain, at the Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracles for Kids in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. Godoy was a bone marrow donor for her older brother Julio, who suffered from aplastic anemia. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Ezequiel Urrutia, 10, of Garden Grove cools off in the water at Newport Dunes during the Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracles for Kids in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities.(Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Tom Swanecamp, Miracles for Kids board member, gives Natalie Avila, 6, at the Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracle for Kids in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Mayte Canepa of Orange, center, gets ready to give her daughter Berenice, 8, ride on a paddle board as Tom Swanecamp, right, gives them a push in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. Kids were taking part in a Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracles for Kids. The program, which was created by board member Swanecamp. invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Kids participating in the Miracles for Kids Surf and Paddle camp shove off into the back bay in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019, on their way to the Newport Dunes water park. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Julio Godoy, 13, , right, of Orange gets some help with his life preserver from Janina Norman, marketing manager for Miracles for Kids during the Surf and Paddle Summer Camp in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. Godoy suffered from aplastic anemia until receiving a bone marrow transplant from his five-year-old sister. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Miracles for Kids board member Tom Swanecamp, center, talks with kids and volunteers before breaking for lunch at the ninth annual Surf and Paddle Summer Camp at Newport Aquatic Center in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Yovani Mijangos, 9, right, helps push a catamaran into the water along with other kids taking part in the ninth annual Surf and Paddle summer camp hosted by Miracles for Kids at the Newport Aquatics Center in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Kids enjoy some time at the Newport Dunes water park during the Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracles for Kids in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) Brianna Ramirez, 14, of Garden Grove enjoys taking a dip in the water at Newport Dunes in Newport Beach on Thursday, July 18, 2019. Ramirez was taking part in the ninth annual Surf and Paddle Summer Camp hosted by Miracle for Kids at Newport Aquatic Center. The program invites critically-ill kids and their families to enjoy a day of paddle activities.(Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) It’s a day to wash away the worry — quality family time simply to enjoy the solace found in saltwater. Miracles for Kids, a nonprofit based in Tustin, gathered a group of critically ill children and their families to enjoy a day on the beach at Newport Dunes and Newport Aquatic Center in the Back Bay on Thursday, July 18. It was a way for families to get relief from their day-to-day stresses. It’s the ninth year the nonprofit has held the paddle-boarding event, with two more surf-focused gatherings coming up July 26 and Aug. 9 near the Newport Pier. Miracles for Kids, founded in 2002, partners with groups such as Waves of Impact, Bru Surf, Endless Summer Surf Camp, and the Newport Aquatic Center for the events. Sign up for our Coast Lines newsletter, a weekly digest of news and features on how the residents of the SoCal coast are building ties to their changing environment. Subscribe here. About 20 children were joined by parents and siblings, Thursday, to enjoy the unique estuary area, exploring with kayaks, outriggers and stand-up paddleboards, and simply playing in the shallow waters. Some jumped around on a big inflatable set out on the bay. “The kids are having a ton of fun, because I think it’s something they don’t get to do on a normal basis,” said Sapphira Ha, programs manager for Miracle for Kids. “They don’t get to do ‘normal’ activities because of so many doctor’s appointments.” It’s a day not just for those dealing with illnesses, but also for their parents. “I’ve talked to parents who feel guilty because they don’t get to spend time with the siblings,” Ha said. “This is just a good opportunity for families to spend time together.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The day was led by instructors from Waves of Impact, based in Oceanside. The events are open to outpatients and their siblings of all skill levels, age 5 to 18, who are registered with Miracles for Kids. Waves of Impact travels throughout California and beyond to hold free surf camps to people facing challenges, including veterans and those diagnosed with critical illnesses.
18 Jul 19
Newsy Today

Bad dreams die fast. 40 miles outside of Chicago. T “You're not gonna see bears,” t Showing me a canister of Counter Assault Bear Deterrent, he added, “The only person youre likely to ridiculous yourself, with the wind.” “The Windy City,” they said. “Exactly.” I ans his suggestion, uneager to blind myself. Recently named a […]

18 Jul 19
Archy news nety

Bad dreams that fast. When I told a salesman at the New York City outpost of REI, the camping supplies store, that I was going camping for four days only 40 miles outside of Chicago, we launched into a conversation about safety in the woods. "You're not going to see bears," he told me, "but […]

18 Jul 19
The Road Less Traveled

Kayaking Day 8, November 5, 2018 I was greeted this morning by a smiling, distant moon and watercolor sky. As my eyes scanned the eastern horizon, I also noticed a planet (although I don’t which), just visible above the golden haze of morning. Lino, who, as I mentioned, sleeps on the panga, was already awake […]

18 Jul 19
The Ruffled Crow

That’s the name off the Welsh village where we’re staying. The closest I can get to a proper pronunciation is ‘Shlandanoog’ or ‘Thlandanug’. The leading double-L is a killer. No matter, though, the folks we’re staying with at Morlyn House are wonderful and our room looks out across fields of sheep and onto the hills […]

18 Jul 19
The Irish Sun
FAVOURITE Rory McIlroy’s dreams of winning The Open for a second time lay in tatters yesterday — after he got off to a horror start on home soil. The Northern Irishman said he felt like punching himself following an opening-round score of 79 at Royal Portrush in Co Antrim — including a quadruple bogey on the first. Rory got off to a horrible start, losing the ball at his first shot Due to his performance golf fans began employing the term snowman The pre-tournament favourite hit a woman and broke her phone with his tee shot on the first, which flew out of bounds. Anna McHelvey, 34, from Bangor, watched on as the Co Down/a> native’s stray shot cracked her screen. Golf fans employed the rarely used term Snowman yesterday, which got it’s name as it refers to the number eight, which looks like a snowman. Should a player record that score on a single hole, as Rory did on the first, then it is given the name of ‘snowman’, much like when a golfer gets a birdie or an eagle. Social media erupted after McIlroy’s horror opener, with one fan asking “Do you wanna build a snowman?”, referencing the movie Frozen. Another said: “Christmas in July?” ‘I WOULD LIKE TO PUNCH MYSELF’ After his round from hell, McIlroy, who shot a course-record 61 at Royal Portrush as a 16-year-old, said: “I would like to punch myself. I made a couple of stupid mistakes. I was pretty nervous on the first tee and hit a bad shot.” Rory, who finished the round with a triple bogey on the 18th, added: “I showed some resilience in the middle of the round and was trying to fight back into the championship but then I finished poorly as well. “At the end of the day I play golf to fulfil my ambitions not anyone else’s but I wish I could have given the crowd something to cheer about. “I let myself down more than anyone else and need to pick myself back up.” McIlroy is an eye-watering 13 shots behind leader JB Holmes and 12 behind Irishman Shane Lowry, who finished on -4. And crowd favourite McIlroy went from 8-1 favourite to win before tee-off, to now being 5-1 just to make the cut. Former world No1 David Duval was dead last after recording a score of 90 on the par 71 course. He recorded a 14-stroke seventh hole — the highest on a single hole at The Open for 69 years. CELEB GUESTS Rugby legend Brian O’Driscoll, tennis ace Tim Henman and ex-One Direction star Niall Horan were spotted among the crowds. Also enjoying the action were Irish boxer Paddy Barnes, former Strictly judge Len Goodman and actor James Nesbitt. O’Driscoll said he was chuffed to be at what he called a “great” event. He said The Open in Portrush “has the makings of being better than all the previous ones”. The former Ireland and Leinster centre is an ambassador for sponsors HSBC. He said: “It’s brilliant Northern Ireland is showcasing what it’s capable of in hosting world class events.” Goodman said: “It’s been fantastic. I’ve got to congratulate Portrush.” CLARKE’S GRAND OPENING The Open officially started at 6.35am when the old master Darren Clarke teed off. Declaring himself powered by a “bacon butty,” the confident Co Tyrone man played an even-par 71 in a solid opening round, celebrating later with a smoke. He said: “I probably smiled a little bit more today than I normally do.” What 39-year-old home town hero Graeme McDowell, who has played that course countless times, would have given for that result. He lost a ball along the way, couldn’t find it in time and ended with a ­triple bogey. The 2010 US Open winner seemed to take his fury out on his golf bag, giving it a boot at one stage as he carded a 73. Royal Portrush Head Professional Gary McNeill said all in all day one had been “inspirational” in terms of what it meant to people. But for Rory, he said, it had been “a dreadful start”. He added: “It’s not like him. “I’m sure he is bitterly disappointed. ‘I’VE NEVER SEEN IT AS FULL’ “His season was almost revolving around this tournament. I’m sure he will come out fighting tomorrow. But it’s not the start he wanted.” He said he had never before seen so many people queuing so early to see the tournament begin. He added: “They were queueing up from shortly after 5am to get in. So it was very fitting to see Darren Clarke hit the opening tee shot. “I’ve never seen it as full for the opening tee shot at an Open before.” It was the first time The Open has been played at Royal Portrush in 68 years, thanks to the work of Clarke, McIlroy and McDowell. In 2013 we revealed the trio’s success in bringing The Open — and its €110million in total prize money — back to Royal Portrush. In 2015 golf’s governing body formally announced the Co Antrim course as host, some citing the end of the Troubles as one key driver for the decision. Since then the course has had an extraordinary revamp with holes and dunes reshaped. [article-rail-section title=”LATEST GOLF NEWS ” posts_category=”9″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”popular” /] Meanwhile, a loyalist “celebration of marching bands” is set to kick off around 6.30pm tomorrow in Portrush. The event is set to be eyed by visitors leaving the course. At around 10pm the bands will wrap up and march to an Orange Hall in the town. The event is being seen as a compromise given that traditional Orange Order Twelfth events were reworked due The Open. McIlroy falls down the rankings The spectator’s phone cracked by McIlroy in his first shot
18 Jul 19
WFRV Local 5
MANITOWOC, Wis. (WFRV) Northeastern Wisconsin musical leader Michael Joseph Arendt died unexpectedly at his home in Manitowoc Tuesday, July 16, at age 74. Arendt was especially active in the Manitowoc area, including founding the Lakeshore Wind Ensemble. According to his obituary, Arendt was a native of Luxemburg, born Jan. 10, 1945. He started playing French horn as a boy. Arendt earned a bachelor of music degree from St. Norbert College in De Pere. He earned a master of music degree in conducting, performance and music theory from Wichita Kansas State University. He was founder and conductor of the University of Wisconsin-Manitowoc Lakeshore Wind Ensemble and the Lakeshore Big Band. He was professor emeritus of Music at UW-Manitowoc, where he taught music theory, music history, applied French horn and conducting from 1971 until his retirement from teaching in 2006. He stepped down from the conductor’s podium in 2014. Arendt served a term as chair of the Department of Music of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and was an associate dean at UW-Manitowoc. He received a Citation of Excellence from the Wisconsin Chapter of the National Band Association and was recognized by the Wisconsin Music Educators Association for his dedicated service. In the greater Green Bay area, Arendt was assistant conductor and principal horn with the Green Bay Symphony Orchestra and principal horn with the Pamiro Opera Company Orchestra, the Sebastian Chamber Orchestra and the St. Norbert Community Band. Additionally, Arendt was active in the Manitowoc and Green Bay communities. In Manitowoc, he was a lector and communion minister at St. Francis of Assisi Parish; a past president of the former Holy Innocents Parish Council; and a member of the Manitowoc International Relations Association, the Capitol Civic Center, the Woodland Dunes Nature Center and Preserve and the Rahr/West Museum. In Green Bay, Arendt served as a lector and communion minister at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral; a member of the St. Francis Xavier Cathedral Parish Council; and a president of the Green Bay East Side Catholic System School Board. He also was a Knights of Columbus Fourth Degree (inactive). Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, July 23, at St. Francis of Assisi on Waldo, 1121 N. 14th St. Manitowoc. The Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated by Rev. Doug LeCaptain with entombment to be held at Nicolet Memorial Park in Green Bay. The family will greet relatives and friends at the Harrigan Parkside Funeral Home from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, July 22. A prayer service will be held at 6:30 p.m. led by Deacon Mark Knipp. The visitation will continue Tuesday at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church on Waldo from 10 a.m. until the time of services at 11 a.m. Online condolence may be sent to the family at www.harriganparksidefuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate memorials to St. Francis Assisi Parish; the Lakeshore Wind Ensemble Association, Inc. Manitowoc; and the UW-Manitowoc Foundation, Beatrice and Matthew Arendt Talentship Fund.
18 Jul 19
Murder By Text

Ocean on an Oregon sand dune

18 Jul 19
Site Title

Last year we went on our first family road trip. We wanted to see how we would all handle a week on the road together. My plan was to go somewhere none of us have been, and experience something amazing together. A friend mentioned her family went to Niagara Falls that summer and really enjoyed […]

18 Jul 19
Daily Millennial

Fear the Fury

18 Jul 19
Giglio's Travels

Day 32; Monday, July 15: Drive Gladstone Bay to Christmas, MI; 55 Miles The drive today took us from Lake Michigan, north across the wilderness of the Upper Peninsula to the southern shore of Lake Superior. Our campground for the next 4 nights is Pictured Rocks RV Park in Christmas, MI, just west of Munising, […]

18 Jul 19
Red Tricycle

Been looking for a deluxe Caribbean vacation where you and the kids can chill in paradise? We know the place.