Electric Vehicle

21 Apr 19
Eurasia News Online

Safe, high-density battery developed in Hong Kong is tipped to boost penetration of renewable energy A safe, high-rate and long-life oxygen battery that exploits a potassium biphenyl complex anode instead of the problematic potassium metal anode has recently been developed by researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. The technology promises a safe and […]

21 Apr 19
The City I See

In Norway, electric vehicles outsold petrol and diesel cars combined this year. In Australia, the government spent billions of dollars building new roads for existing vehicles. We’re spending big money locking in our current infrastructure system, but the world is moving on rapidly. What happens when electric vehicles (EV) and autonomous vehicles (AV) come in […]

21 Apr 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
WASHINGTON — Some government foolishness has an educational value that compensates for its considerable cost. Consider the multibillion-dollar federal electric-vehicle tax credit, which efficiently illustrates how government can, with one act, diminish its already-negligible prestige while subtracting from America’s fairness. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jason Smith, R-Mo., hope to repeal the tax credit, which probably will survive because it does something that government enjoys doing: It transfers wealth upward by subsidizing affluent individuals and large economic entities. In 1992, Congress, with its itch to supplant the market in telling people what to build and buy, established a subsidy for buyers of electric vehicles, which then were a negligible fraction of the vehicle market. In 2009, however, as the nation reeled from the Great Recession, the Obama administration acted on an axiom of the president’s chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel: “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste.” Using the crisis as an excuse to do what they wanted to do anyway, those who think government planning of the U.S economy is a neat idea joined with environmentalists to persuade Congress — persuading it to dispense money is not difficult — to create a tax credit of up to $7,500 for consumers who buy battery-powered electric vehicles. The tax credit was part of the administration’s “stimulus” package, which is most remembered for its promise of “shovel-ready” jobs. The president, too busy expanding the government to understand the consequences of prior expansions, discovered that such jobs are almost nonexistent, thanks to red tape that must be untangled before shovels can be wielded. The tax credit quickly became another example of the government’s solicitousness for those who are comfortable, and who are skillful in defense of their comforts. Today, demand for electric cars is still insufficient to produce manufacturing economies of scale (after a decade of production, moral exhortations and subsidies, electric cars are a fraction of 1% of all vehicle sales), and batteries are expensive. So, The Wall Street Journal reports, the $42,000 average price for an electric car is $8,000 more than the average price of a new car, and $22,000 more than the average price of a new small gasoline-powered car. The Pacific Research Institute has examined 2014 IRS data showing that 79% of the electric-vehicle tax credits were collected by households with adjusted gross incomes of more than $100,000, and 1% by households earning less than $50,000. A 2017 survey found that households earning $200,000 received the most from the tax credit. Some states have augmented the federal credit: In California, where about half of electric vehicles are sold, consumers can gain up to $15,000; in insolvent Connecticut — blue states are incorrigible — $10,500. The credit is, however, capped: Manufacturers can only sell 200,000 vehicles eligible for the full credit. Now almost all manufacturers (including high-end companies Bentley, Aston Martin and Maserati) are entering the electric-vehicle sector, and the cap is impinging on some of them (General Motors, Nissan). So, at long last such vehicles can be allowed to sink or swim on their own, right? Of course not. The Barrasso-Smith legislation is fiercely opposed by the manufacturers, who of course want to expand and entrench it by removing the cap, partly because they know what the Journal knows: “When Georgia ended its $5,000 state tax credit in 2015, sales of electric vehicles fell 89% in two months.” Electric cars have cachet with advanced thinkers who want to be, or to be seen to be, environmentally nice. They do not think of such vehicles as 27.4% coal cars, that being the percentage of U.S. electricity generated by coal-fired power plants. According to a Manhattan Institute study: “[B]ecause of stringent emissions standards and low-sulfur gasoline, new ICVs [internal combustion vehicles] today emit very little pollution, and they will emit even less in the future. Compared with new ICVs, ZEVs [zero-emissions vehicles] charged with the forecast mix of electric generation will emit more criteria air pollutants.” And the reduction of carbon dioxide — “less than 1% of total forecast[ed] energy-related U.S. CO2 emissions through 2050” — “will have no measurable impact on climate.” The environmental excuse for the regressive tax credit being nonexistent, those Democratic senators whose presidential campaigns are fueled by fury about government being “rigged” for the benefit of “the rich” who are not paying “their fair share” will join their Wyoming colleague’s attempt to end the electric-vehicle tax credit, if they mean what they say. If. George Will’s email address is georgewill@washpost.com.
21 Apr 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
WASHINGTON — Some government foolishness has an educational value that compensates for its considerable cost. Consider the multibillion-dollar federal electric-vehicle tax credit, which efficiently illustrates how government can, with one act, diminish its already-negligible prestige while subtracting from America’s fairness. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jason Smith, R-Mo., hope to repeal the tax credit, which probably will survive because it does something that government enjoys doing: It transfers wealth upward by subsidizing affluent individuals and large economic entities. In 1992, Congress, with its itch to supplant the market in telling people what to build and buy, established a subsidy for buyers of electric vehicles, which then were a negligible fraction of the vehicle market. In 2009, however, as the nation reeled from the Great Recession, the Obama administration acted on an axiom of the president’s chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel: “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste.” Using the crisis as an excuse to do what they wanted to do anyway, those who think government planning of the U.S economy is a neat idea joined with environmentalists to persuade Congress — persuading it to dispense money is not difficult — to create a tax credit of up to $7,500 for consumers who buy battery-powered electric vehicles. The tax credit was part of the administration’s “stimulus” package, which is most remembered for its promise of “shovel-ready” jobs. The president, too busy expanding the government to understand the consequences of prior expansions, discovered that such jobs are almost nonexistent, thanks to red tape that must be untangled before shovels can be wielded. The tax credit quickly became another example of the government’s solicitousness for those who are comfortable, and who are skillful in defense of their comforts. Today, demand for electric cars is still insufficient to produce manufacturing economies of scale (after a decade of production, moral exhortations and subsidies, electric cars are a fraction of 1% of all vehicle sales), and batteries are expensive. So, The Wall Street Journal reports, the $42,000 average price for an electric car is $8,000 more than the average price of a new car, and $22,000 more than the average price of a new small gasoline-powered car. The Pacific Research Institute has examined 2014 IRS data showing that 79% of the electric-vehicle tax credits were collected by households with adjusted gross incomes of more than $100,000, and 1% by households earning less than $50,000. A 2017 survey found that households earning $200,000 received the most from the tax credit. Some states have augmented the federal credit: In California, where about half of electric vehicles are sold, consumers can gain up to $15,000; in insolvent Connecticut — blue states are incorrigible — $10,500. The credit is, however, capped: Manufacturers can only sell 200,000 vehicles eligible for the full credit. Now almost all manufacturers (including high-end companies Bentley, Aston Martin and Maserati) are entering the electric-vehicle sector, and the cap is impinging on some of them (General Motors, Nissan). So, at long last such vehicles can be allowed to sink or swim on their own, right? Of course not. The Barrasso-Smith legislation is fiercely opposed by the manufacturers, who of course want to expand and entrench it by removing the cap, partly because they know what the Journal knows: “When Georgia ended its $5,000 state tax credit in 2015, sales of electric vehicles fell 89% in two months.” Electric cars have cachet with advanced thinkers who want to be, or to be seen to be, environmentally nice. They do not think of such vehicles as 27.4% coal cars, that being the percentage of U.S. electricity generated by coal-fired power plants. According to a Manhattan Institute study: “[B]ecause of stringent emissions standards and low-sulfur gasoline, new ICVs [internal combustion vehicles] today emit very little pollution, and they will emit even less in the future. Compared with new ICVs, ZEVs [zero-emissions vehicles] charged with the forecast mix of electric generation will emit more criteria air pollutants.” And the reduction of carbon dioxide — “less than 1% of total forecast[ed] energy-related U.S. CO2 emissions through 2050” — “will have no measurable impact on climate.” The environmental excuse for the regressive tax credit being nonexistent, those Democratic senators whose presidential campaigns are fueled by fury about government being “rigged” for the benefit of “the rich” who are not paying “their fair share” will join their Wyoming colleague’s attempt to end the electric-vehicle tax credit, if they mean what they say. If. George Will’s email address is georgewill@washpost.com.
21 Apr 19

COMMUNITY ACTION ALLIANCE FOR NSW (CAAN): HOUSING INEQUALITY WITH AUSSIES LOCKED OUT!

APRIL 21 2019  Labor started the election campaign with one crucial advantage Max Koslowski Federal Politics The Coalition is bombarding voters with targeted online advertisements in an effort to narrow the gap between it and social media-savvy Labor in a campaign experts say will be won or lost on the digital battleground. Labor enters the […]

21 Apr 19
Metro
An investigation has been launched after a video revealed the scale of abuse that some of Egypt’s animal tourist attractions are suffering. Speaking out at the weekend, PETA Asia said they were looking into footage shot at top tourism destinations – including the Great Pyramid of Giza, Saqqara, and Luxor. In the clips, horses are forced to walk through hot temperatures with open wounds, and camels were filmed being whipped in the testicles. [metro-video id=”1909528″ video=”https://videos.metro.co.uk/video/met/2019/04/21/1524966178102856739/640x360_MP4_1524966178102856739.mp4″ image=”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/04/21/07/12530674-0-image-a-5_1555829039400.jpg”%5D Speaking out at the weekend, PETA Asia said they were looking into footage shot at top tourism destinations – including the Great Pyramid of Giza, Saqqara, and Luxor (Picture: PETA Asia) Eyewitnesses also claimed that camels were beaten at the Birqash Camel Market before being sold to the tourism industry. PETA is now calling for a ban on the use of working animals at tourist sites in the country. [metro-zone-post-thumbnail-link] Speaking today, a spokesperson said: ‘Video footage shows handlers in Giza violently beating a horse who’d collapsed on her side while being forced to pull a carriage. ‘She was severely injured by her fall, but they continued to beat her until she got back up. ‘Many horses used for rides in Giza and Luxor had painful, bloody wounds and were forced to wait in the scorching sun for the next paying customer – without food, water, or access to shade. In the clips, horses are forced to walk through hot temperatures with open wounds, and camels were filmed being whipped in the testicles (Picture: PETA Asia) PETA is now calling for a ban on the use of working animals at tourist sites in the country (Picture: PETA Asia) Open sores on a horse (Picture: PETA Asia) Eyewitnesses also claimed that camels were beaten at the Birqash Camel Market before being sold to the tourism industry (Picture: PETA Asia) ‘Many of the animals’ faces were bloody, and one camel foamed at the mouth’ (Picture: PETA Asia) ‘Emaciated horses whose ribs showed through their skin were repeatedly yanked and whipped. ‘And at the notorious Birqash Camel Market, men and children were observed viciously beating screaming camels with sticks. [metro-zone-post-thumbnail-link] ‘Many of the animals’ faces were bloody, and one camel foamed at the mouth.’ PETA Director Elisa Allen added: ‘It’s disgraceful that exhausted, emaciated animals in Egypt are beaten and whipped into giving endless rides in the heat, even as their legs buckle and they collapse. ‘PETA is calling on the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism to replace these abused animals with modern vehicles such as electric rickshaws so that tourists can appreciate the country’s rich history without supporting cruelty to animals.’
21 Apr 19
Blog For Iowa

Earth Day comes right after Easter this year. Maybe some in the media can help Americans make the jump from believing in unprovable mystic mumbo-jumbo into believing in scientific facts and analysis.  We have had warning after warning after warning, with each subsequent warning more dire than the previous one. We are seeing predicted effects […]

21 Apr 19
hirudov

RKS RN 180 (2019) Exterior and Interior 2019 RKS RNX motorcycle seen from outside and inside. The vehicle has 4-stroke, single-cylinder, 2-valve, 189 ccm, 13.07 hp at 8,500 rpm engine. Max torque 13.4 Nm at 6,500 rpm. 5-speed. Carburetor fuel system. C.D.I. ignition. Air cooled. Electric operation. Disc front and rear brakes. Front tires 120/70-14″. […]

21 Apr 19
The Siasat Daily

San Francisco: Electric vehicle (EV)-maker Tesla has slammed Randeep Hothi — one of the short-sellers of the company and also its prominent Twitter critic — with a restraining order on charges of stalking, harassing and endangering company employees. In its complaint, Tesla claimed that three of its employees who were driving a ‘Model 3’ car […]

21 Apr 19
Pakistan News Urdu Fast

Global automakers are positioning for a brave new world of on-demand transport that will require a car of the future — hyper-connected, autonomous, and shared — and China may become the concept’s laboratory. With ride-hailing services booming and car-sharing not far behind, the need for vehicles tailored to these and other evolving mobility solutions is […]

21 Apr 19
Official Cryptocurrency Blockchain Bitcoin News & Information

[ad_1] German automobile company, Volkswagen Group, on Thursday said it will henceforth utilize the Blockchain technology in keeping track of its mineral supply chain. This, it said, is in a bid to “responsibly source” minerals such as cobalt, which are important components in making lithium-ion batteries used for electric vehicles. Recall that in 2018, IOTA […]

21 Apr 19
The common man's travel guide

Amritsar was founded by the 4 th Sikh Guru Ramdas in 1577. He guided the construction of the building of the holiest of the Sikh gurudwaras in the middle of the Amrit sarovar tank from which the city gets its name. The city is also often referred to as Ramdaspur . We took an Indigo […]

21 Apr 19
Social News XYZ

San Francisco, April 21 (IANS) Electric vehicle (EV)-maker Tesla has slammed Randeep Hothi — one of the short-sellers of the company and also its prominent Twitter critic — with a restraining order on charges of stalking, harassing and endangering company employees. In its complaint, Tesla claimed that three of its employees who were driving a […]

21 Apr 19
Houston Energy Industry News

Electric cars are not a part of the solution to global warming because their efficiencies simply are not good enough.  I have put together some numbers to show you why.  Lets take a look. As I travel the US and visit energy conferences around the country, sometimes I am told that electric cars have no […]