Emerson Brooks

23 Mar 19
JoCo Report

Adams, Madison Carolann; Adams, Zachary Landon; Alford, Alyssa Lynn; Alford, Haley Elizabeth; Allen, Jakob Davis; Alvarez Orozco, Edgar; Alvarez Ortiz, Melannie; Anayiotou, Margarita Rose; Andrade-Tolentino, Yaneli; Anguish, Ashlyn Brooke; Arbutina, Emma Rose; Archambault, Haleigh Marie; Arnold, Kelsey Grace; Arteaga, Olivia Gladys; Avila, Cassidy Lynn; Aycock, Jessica Logan; Aycock, Morgan Bennett; Bagwell, Caitlyn Alyssa; Baker, Hunter […]

23 Mar 19
Now! Newington

GEORGETOWN 90, SHU WOMEN 59 WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Hoyas used a 22-2 run in the third quarter to pull away from the Pioneers in a WNIT first round game at McDonough Arena. Georgetown (17-15) advances to play at Harvard in the second round on Sunday at 3. Erin Storck scored a team-high 18 points […]

23 Mar 19
Now! Newington

GEORGETOWN 90, SHU WOMEN 59 WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Hoyas used a 22-2 run in the third quarter to pull away from the Pioneers in a WNIT first round game at McDonough Arena. Georgetown (17-15) advances to play at Harvard in the second round on Sunday at 3. Erin Storck scored a team-high 18 points […]

22 Mar 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1624014-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1624014-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1624014-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1624014-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ CEO of United Way of Southern Nevada Kyle Rahn poses for a portrait in a conference room at the United Way of Southern Nevada office in Las Vegas, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @carolinebrehman CEO of United Way of Southern Nevada Kyle Rahn poses for a portrait in a conference room at the United Way of Southern Nevada office in Las Vegas, Tuesday, March 12, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @carolinebrehman Vegas Voices is a weekly series highlighting notable Las Vegans. Kyle B. Rahn doesn’t fit the mold of a typical CEO. She comes across more like the CEO in one of those body-switch comedies, the one who would be put in charge after a stuffy business woman has traded places with a blunt, folksy country singer played by Reba McEntire. “I’m not your prototypical ‘Let’s go shoppin’ ’ kinda gal,” says Rahn, the new president and CEO of United Way of Southern Nevada. “My idea of shopping is Bass Pro Shops. I’m serious. Dead serious.” You can look for the executive, an avid bass fisher, in the jig aisle. Rahn, who started leading the local chapter Feb. 4, is the nonprofit’s third new CEO since October 2015, following Bob Morgan and Scott Emerson, the latter of whom took over just last February. She comes to Las Vegas from the Washington, D.C., area, where she spent the past four years as senior director of fund development for the National Society of Black Engineers. Before that, she was vice president for resource development for United Way of the National Capital Area. You could say she’s returning to an organization that’s in her blood, as both her father and grandfather were United Way pledge drive captains in her native Muncie, Indiana. Rahn just turned 59. “And I’m single,” she adds. Asked if that’s something she wants included in this profile, she’s quick to laugh and reply, “Hell, yes! You betcha!” She arrived just in time for Nevada’s Big Give, 24 hours of online crowdfunding that directly supports 200 nonprofits throughout the state. The event runs from 12:01 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Thursday at nvbiggive.org. A kickoff party is scheduled for 11 a.m. Thursday on The Green at Town Square. “We’ll always have the service industry, and we’re blessed by that. But we’re going to need more highly skilled people,” Rahn says of her mission to prepare the valley’s workforce for the future. “This is an imperative for me. This is what I love to do. And I lead from my heart, not from my head or my ego. This is what I’m supposed to do, and I know it.” Review-Journal: So how’s Las Vegas treating you so far? Kyle B. Rahn: I flipping love it. Had you spent much time here before you accepted the position? I had, but as a tourist. I don’t gamble. The only thing I gamble on is driving in Washington, D.C., traffic. What is it about United Way that made you want to be involved again? This is my last job. This is my last move. This is a dynamic, growing community which affords someone like myself an incredible quality of life, but it’s still got that small-town feel like I grew up with in Muncie. But, more importantly, with that explosive growth is going to come a huge need for United Way in the social sector. There’s been a bit of churn atop United Way here recently. Are you hoping to bring some stability? The genie’s out of the bottle. There has been instability. But my job is to come, stabilize and drive the United Way forward in an effort to make our community better and help those who need it most. And we are focused on cradle to career. It’s incumbent upon us to ensure that our citizenry is adequately prepared to accept the jobs that will be coming as a result of our community growing so quickly. Can you talk a little about Nevada’s Big Give? The average person probably doesn’t realize that at this time of year, a nonprofit’s reserves become low. The largest percentage of giving is the last three months of the year. … That day is focused to rebuild some of the money that’s needed to operate and to focus on all nonprofits in our community. What are the benefits of focusing on a single day like this? It’s a statement about our community that we really care. We really care about the nonprofits that are serving. We care enough that we might forgo a special cup of coffee from a special coffee shop and donate that. … You’re also creating, which is very important, a culture of philanthropy, for young and old. Statistically, too, we know it’s not the big givers — they are so welcome and wonderful — but it’s the people like you and I who give and give regularly at the lower levels that really can make the biggest difference. So (we’re) doing this at a time of year that’s not Christmas. It’s not Tiny Tim. It’s not your normal philanthropic time of year. Contact Christopher Lawrence at clawrence @reviewjournal.com or 702-380-4567. Follow @life_onthecouch on Twitter. [rjtemplate class=”rj-isidebar1-elem”] Getting to know: Kyle B. Rahn Favorite thing about Las Vegas so far My sunrises and sunsets take my breath away, and they remind me that there’s somebody so much bigger than all of us making that happen, that we get to live in such a beautiful place. Hobbies I love college football and basketball, pro football and basketball, hockey. … And I’m now a Golden Knights crazy fan. Most recent book you read “Thirst” by Scott Harrison, founder of Charity: Water Favorite singer Bruno Mars Something she’s looking forward to doing on the Strip All of the entertainment. The wealth of entertainment just thrills me. I was living in the Flamingo for a month, and every day it was (signs for) Ron White, Diana Ross, Celine Dion, Brooks & Dunn. [/rjtemplate]
21 Mar 19
The Adirondack Almanack

This weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon. Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com. Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do […]

21 Mar 19
The Fantasy Football Chaps

Following on from our Blank GW31 Strategy Guide, the remaining Premier League Blank and Doubles Gameweek’s require some careful navigating, and we won’t be given much notice of the re-arranged fixtures!!  This period can make or break your season, so we’re here to provide some hints and tips to make this a successful period in your Draft League.

21 Mar 19
Douglas County Herald

May 24, 2018 Ava Schools started their five-week summer session this week with offerings at all levels. Seven people were sentenced during Circuit Court Law Day on May 15th. Offenses ranged from second-degree burglary, possession of illegal substances, and probation violation. The City of Ava Aldermen approved the purchase of 10 body cameras for the […]

20 Mar 19
VC Reporter | Southland Publishing
20 Mar 19
WGEH

BELMAR – Dairy Queen is holding its 5th annual “Free Cone” Day today, March 20. Customers can get a free small vanilla soft-serve cone with the signature curl on top. The limit is one per customer while supplies last. Participating stores will also be accepting donations to local organizations. Here are the participating New Jersey […]

20 Mar 19
Daily News
#gallery-3065499-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3065499-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-3065499-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3065499-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, left, and forward Jonathan Galloway, right, celebrate after Welp scored a basket against Cal State Fullerton during Saturday’s Big West Tournament title game at Honda Center. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine guard Max Hazzard (2) celebrates with forward Collin Welp, right, after Welp made a basket and drew a foul during the second half of the Big West Tournament title game against Cal State Fullerton on Saturday night at Honda Center. UCI won 92-64. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, center, passes around UC Riverside center Menno Dijkstra, left, and forward Zac Watson, right, during the first half of Big West Tournament quarterfinal game last week at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) UCI’s Collin Welp shoots during a nonconference game against Utah State on Dec. 1, 2018 at UCI’s Bren Events Center. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine’s Collin Welp celebrates after making a 3-pointer against UC Riverside during their Big West Tournament quarterfinal last week at Honda Center. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, right, is fouled by Long Beach State forward KJ Byers during the first half of their Big West Tournament semifinal last Friday at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong) IRVINE — Collin Welp scored during the Big West Tournament semifinals and the public address announcer said, “Basket by Christian Welp.” In the seats was Melanie, Christian’s widow and Collin’s mom. “That was pretty emotional for her,” said Granville Emerson, Collin’s assistant coach at Seattle Prep High. He was sitting nearby at Honda Center, as UC Irvine rolled to the Big West championship last weekend. The next night, Collin channeled Christian. He went on a 5-for-5 rampage in the second half. He ended up with 23 points, five above his previous high in his redshirt freshman year. The Anteaters beat Cal State Fullerton by 28 points. On Friday in San Jose, they play Kansas State in a first-round game of the NCAA Tournament. “Obviously it was crazy,” Welp said at the Bren Center on Tuesday. “I train hard just to have an impact on games like that. Fullerton had beaten us in the tournament final last year and it was tough. I was just glad to help.” Much is made of the NBA DNA that distinguishes the Anteaters. Max Hazzard, the long-bombing guard, is the grandson of Walt Hazzard. J.C. Butler is the son of Caron. Spencer Rivers is Doc’s son. Those last two dads are still around. Christian Welp was felled by a heart attack four years ago, at the family vacation home at Hood Canal, Wash. He was only 51. UC Irvine coach Russell Turner spoke Saturday night of the “challenge” he faces in coaching the sons of former pros. “It’s great, it provides accountability,” Turner said. It’s one thing to ignore the unsolicited advice of an accountant or a car mechanic whose son happens to shoot 3-pointers, but when All-Stars speak, the coach generally listens. Christian Welp probably wouldn’t have critiqued Turner’s moves. “If you could ever say a 7-footer is unassuming, that was him,” Emerson said. Yet Welp was also unappreciated. He might have been a major pro if he hadn’t torn up a knee in his third NBA season, but then he won nine championships in nine years in Europe. He remains the leading scorer in University of Washington history, and one night he laid 40 points on Reggie Miller and UCLA. Scott Brooks, perhaps UCI’s best player ever, played with Welp in Philadelphia. “He told me Christian was one of the best teammates he ever had,” Turner said. “I wish I’d known him.” Welp, from Delmenhorst in Germany, actually came to East Bremerton, Wash. as an exchange student and thought he might return after one year. Instead, he followed countryman Detlef Schrempf to Washington and played in three NCAA tournaments and won two Pac-10s titles. The Huskies beat Duke to reach the 1984 Sweet 16, even though Jay Bilas somehow outscored Welp 10-8. They also made a regular-season visit to Duke, in a time when the Cameron Crazies actually gave you a night at the improv and were creatively naughty instead of scripted. With Schrempf on the line, the Dukies began yelling, “Luftball!,” which is airball in German. “He told me that story and all the other ones,” Collin said, smiling. “Growing up, he was my coach and he taught me everything I know, but he was never super-overbearing. When I would play, people might have expected me to be like him and sometimes it was tougher. As I grew, I became my own player. I learned to embrace it.” Four days after Christian died, Collin scored 13 points and got five rebounds in a Class 3-A playoff quarterfinal against Tacoma Lakeside. The fans wore shirts with Christian’s No. 40 on then, just as Emerson did at the Honda Center last weekend. Even Lakeside’s players had “CW 40” on their socks. “Collin shot a lot of 3s back then,” Emerson said. “His dad taught me a lot about footwork, and we worked on it, too, and against Fullerton, I saw him put it into practice. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“Collin didn’t play well Friday night. He said he hadn’t played well against Long Beach State, and maybe that’s because I’m always teasing him because that’s where I went to school. But he told me he was going to play great on Saturday, and you all saw that.” Collin is 6-foot-9 and 215 pounds, stronger after that redshirt season. Turner saw him playing in Anaheim, on Emerson’s AAU team. “Normally you’re sorting through the guys you think you can get,” Turner said. “I took one look at Collin and I said, ‘Yeah, that one. That guy.’ ” “They recruited me and I saw they had a championship tradition,” Welp said. “I just told him, look, take the trip,” Emerson said, laughing. “Just go see it.” Now the growing bandwagon of UCI fans sees Welp. Those who knew the father see both.
20 Mar 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
#gallery-1890027-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1890027-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1890027-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1890027-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, left, and forward Jonathan Galloway, right, celebrate after Welp scored a basket against Cal State Fullerton during Saturday’s Big West Tournament title game at Honda Center. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine guard Max Hazzard (2) celebrates with forward Collin Welp, right, after Welp made a basket and drew a foul during the second half of the Big West Tournament title game against Cal State Fullerton on Saturday night at Honda Center. UCI won 92-64. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, center, passes around UC Riverside center Menno Dijkstra, left, and forward Zac Watson, right, during the first half of Big West Tournament quarterfinal game last week at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) UCI’s Collin Welp shoots during a nonconference game against Utah State on Dec. 1, 2018 at UCI’s Bren Events Center. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine’s Collin Welp celebrates after making a 3-pointer against UC Riverside during their Big West Tournament quarterfinal last week at Honda Center. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, right, is fouled by Long Beach State forward KJ Byers during the first half of their Big West Tournament semifinal last Friday at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong) IRVINE — Collin Welp scored during the Big West Tournament semifinals and the public address announcer said, “Basket by Christian Welp.” In the seats was Melanie, Christian’s widow and Collin’s mom. “That was pretty emotional for her,” said Granville Emerson, Collin’s assistant coach at Seattle Prep High. He was sitting nearby at Honda Center, as UC Irvine rolled to the Big West championship last weekend. The next night, Collin channeled Christian. He went on a 5-for-5 rampage in the second half. He ended up with 23 points, five above his previous high in his redshirt freshman year. The Anteaters beat Cal State Fullerton by 28 points. On Friday in San Jose, they play Kansas State in a first-round game of the NCAA Tournament. “Obviously it was crazy,” Welp said at the Bren Center on Tuesday. “I train hard just to have an impact on games like that. Fullerton had beaten us in the tournament final last year and it was tough. I was just glad to help.” Much is made of the NBA DNA that distinguishes the Anteaters. Max Hazzard, the long-bombing guard, is the grandson of Walt Hazzard. J.C. Butler is the son of Caron. Spencer Rivers is Doc’s son. Those last two dads are still around. Christian Welp was felled by a heart attack four years ago, at the family vacation home at Hood Canal, Wash. He was only 51. UC Irvine coach Russell Turner spoke Saturday night of the “challenge” he faces in coaching the sons of former pros. “It’s great, it provides accountability,” Turner said. It’s one thing to ignore the unsolicited advice of an accountant or a car mechanic whose son happens to shoot 3-pointers, but when All-Stars speak, the coach generally listens. Christian Welp probably wouldn’t have critiqued Turner’s moves. “If you could ever say a 7-footer is unassuming, that was him,” Emerson said. Yet Welp was also unappreciated. He might have been a major pro if he hadn’t torn up a knee in his third NBA season, but then he won nine championships in nine years in Europe. He remains the leading scorer in University of Washington history, and one night he laid 40 points on Reggie Miller and UCLA. Scott Brooks, perhaps UCI’s best player ever, played with Welp in Philadelphia. “He told me Christian was one of the best teammates he ever had,” Turner said. “I wish I’d known him.” Welp, from Delmenhorst in Germany, actually came to East Bremerton, Wash. as an exchange student and thought he might return after one year. Instead, he followed countryman Detlef Schrempf to Washington and played in three NCAA tournaments and won two Pac-10s titles. The Huskies beat Duke to reach the 1984 Sweet 16, even though Jay Bilas somehow outscored Welp 10-8. They also made a regular-season visit to Duke, in a time when the Cameron Crazies actually gave you a night at the improv and were creatively naughty instead of scripted. With Schrempf on the line, the Dukies began yelling, “Luftball!,” which is airball in German. “He told me that story and all the other ones,” Collin said, smiling. “Growing up, he was my coach and he taught me everything I know, but he was never super-overbearing. When I would play, people might have expected me to be like him and sometimes it was tougher. As I grew, I became my own player. I learned to embrace it.” Four days after Christian died, Collin scored 13 points and got five rebounds in a Class 3-A playoff quarterfinal against Tacoma Lakeside. The fans wore shirts with Christian’s No. 40 on then, just as Emerson did at the Honda Center last weekend. Even Lakeside’s players had “CW 40” on their socks. “Collin shot a lot of 3s back then,” Emerson said. “His dad taught me a lot about footwork, and we worked on it, too, and against Fullerton, I saw him put it into practice. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“Collin didn’t play well Friday night. He said he hadn’t played well against Long Beach State, and maybe that’s because I’m always teasing him because that’s where I went to school. But he told me he was going to play great on Saturday, and you all saw that.” Collin is 6-foot-9 and 215 pounds, stronger after that redshirt season. Turner saw him playing in Anaheim, on Emerson’s AAU team. “Normally you’re sorting through the guys you think you can get,” Turner said. “I took one look at Collin and I said, ‘Yeah, that one. That guy.’ ” “They recruited me and I saw they had a championship tradition,” Welp said. “I just told him, look, take the trip,” Emerson said, laughing. “Just go see it.” Now the growing bandwagon of UCI fans sees Welp. Those who knew the father see both.
20 Mar 19
Daily Breeze
#gallery-1754989-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1754989-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1754989-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1754989-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, left, and forward Jonathan Galloway, right, celebrate after Welp scored a basket against Cal State Fullerton during Saturday’s Big West Tournament title game at Honda Center. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine guard Max Hazzard (2) celebrates with forward Collin Welp, right, after Welp made a basket and drew a foul during the second half of the Big West Tournament title game against Cal State Fullerton on Saturday night at Honda Center. UCI won 92-64. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, center, passes around UC Riverside center Menno Dijkstra, left, and forward Zac Watson, right, during the first half of Big West Tournament quarterfinal game last week at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) UCI’s Collin Welp shoots during a nonconference game against Utah State on Dec. 1, 2018 at UCI’s Bren Events Center. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine’s Collin Welp celebrates after making a 3-pointer against UC Riverside during their Big West Tournament quarterfinal last week at Honda Center. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, right, is fouled by Long Beach State forward KJ Byers during the first half of their Big West Tournament semifinal last Friday at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong) IRVINE — Collin Welp scored during the Big West Tournament semifinals and the public address announcer said, “Basket by Christian Welp.” In the seats was Melanie, Christian’s widow and Collin’s mom. “That was pretty emotional for her,” said Granville Emerson, Collin’s assistant coach at Seattle Prep High. He was sitting nearby at Honda Center, as UC Irvine rolled to the Big West championship last weekend. The next night, Collin channeled Christian. He went on a 5-for-5 rampage in the second half. He ended up with 23 points, five above his previous high in his redshirt freshman year. The Anteaters beat Cal State Fullerton by 28 points. On Friday in San Jose, they play Kansas State in a first-round game of the NCAA Tournament. “Obviously it was crazy,” Welp said at the Bren Center on Tuesday. “I train hard just to have an impact on games like that. Fullerton had beaten us in the tournament final last year and it was tough. I was just glad to help.” Much is made of the NBA DNA that distinguishes the Anteaters. Max Hazzard, the long-bombing guard, is the grandson of Walt Hazzard. J.C. Butler is the son of Caron. Spencer Rivers is Doc’s son. Those last two dads are still around. Christian Welp was felled by a heart attack four years ago, at the family vacation home at Hood Canal, Wash. He was only 51. UC Irvine coach Russell Turner spoke Saturday night of the “challenge” he faces in coaching the sons of former pros. “It’s great, it provides accountability,” Turner said. It’s one thing to ignore the unsolicited advice of an accountant or a car mechanic whose son happens to shoot 3-pointers, but when All-Stars speak, the coach generally listens. Christian Welp probably wouldn’t have critiqued Turner’s moves. “If you could ever say a 7-footer is unassuming, that was him,” Emerson said. Yet Welp was also unappreciated. He might have been a major pro if he hadn’t torn up a knee in his third NBA season, but then he won nine championships in nine years in Europe. He remains the leading scorer in University of Washington history, and one night he laid 40 points on Reggie Miller and UCLA. Scott Brooks, perhaps UCI’s best player ever, played with Welp in Philadelphia. “He told me Christian was one of the best teammates he ever had,” Turner said. “I wish I’d known him.” Welp, from Delmenhorst in Germany, actually came to East Bremerton, Wash. as an exchange student and thought he might return after one year. Instead, he followed countryman Detlef Schrempf to Washington and played in three NCAA tournaments and won two Pac-10s titles. The Huskies beat Duke to reach the 1984 Sweet 16, even though Jay Bilas somehow outscored Welp 10-8. They also made a regular-season visit to Duke, in a time when the Cameron Crazies actually gave you a night at the improv and were creatively naughty instead of scripted. With Schrempf on the line, the Dukies began yelling, “Luftball!,” which is airball in German. “He told me that story and all the other ones,” Collin said, smiling. “Growing up, he was my coach and he taught me everything I know, but he was never super-overbearing. When I would play, people might have expected me to be like him and sometimes it was tougher. As I grew, I became my own player. I learned to embrace it.” Four days after Christian died, Collin scored 13 points and got five rebounds in a Class 3-A playoff quarterfinal against Tacoma Lakeside. The fans wore shirts with Christian’s No. 40 on then, just as Emerson did at the Honda Center last weekend. Even Lakeside’s players had “CW 40” on their socks. “Collin shot a lot of 3s back then,” Emerson said. “His dad taught me a lot about footwork, and we worked on it, too, and against Fullerton, I saw him put it into practice. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“Collin didn’t play well Friday night. He said he hadn’t played well against Long Beach State, and maybe that’s because I’m always teasing him because that’s where I went to school. But he told me he was going to play great on Saturday, and you all saw that.” Collin is 6-foot-9 and 215 pounds, stronger after that redshirt season. Turner saw him playing in Anaheim, on Emerson’s AAU team. “Normally you’re sorting through the guys you think you can get,” Turner said. “I took one look at Collin and I said, ‘Yeah, that one. That guy.’ ” “They recruited me and I saw they had a championship tradition,” Welp said. “I just told him, look, take the trip,” Emerson said, laughing. “Just go see it.” Now the growing bandwagon of UCI fans sees Welp. Those who knew the father see both.
20 Mar 19
SCNG
#gallery-1709454-5 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1709454-5 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1709454-5 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1709454-5 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, left, and forward Jonathan Galloway, right, celebrate after Welp scored a basket against Cal State Fullerton during Saturday’s Big West Tournament title game at Honda Center. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine guard Max Hazzard (2) celebrates with forward Collin Welp, right, after Welp made a basket and drew a foul during the second half of the Big West Tournament title game against Cal State Fullerton on Saturday night at Honda Center. UCI won 92-64. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, center, passes around UC Riverside center Menno Dijkstra, left, and forward Zac Watson, right, during the first half of Big West Tournament quarterfinal game last week at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) UCI’s Collin Welp shoots during a nonconference game against Utah State on Dec. 1, 2018 at UCI’s Bren Events Center. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine’s Collin Welp celebrates after making a 3-pointer against UC Riverside during their Big West Tournament quarterfinal last week at Honda Center. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, right, is fouled by Long Beach State forward KJ Byers during the first half of their Big West Tournament semifinal last Friday at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong) IRVINE — Collin Welp scored during the Big West Tournament semifinals and the public address announcer said, “Basket by Christian Welp.” In the seats was Melanie, Christian’s widow and Collin’s mom. “That was pretty emotional for her,” said Granville Emerson, Collin’s assistant coach at Seattle Prep High. He was sitting nearby at Honda Center, as UC Irvine rolled to the Big West championship last weekend. The next night, Collin channeled Christian. He went on a 5-for-5 rampage in the second half. He ended up with 23 points, five above his previous high in his redshirt freshman year. The Anteaters beat Cal State Fullerton by 28 points. On Friday in San Jose, they play Kansas State in a first-round game of the NCAA Tournament. “Obviously it was crazy,” Welp said at the Bren Center on Tuesday. “I train hard just to have an impact on games like that. Fullerton had beaten us in the tournament final last year and it was tough. I was just glad to help.” Much is made of the NBA DNA that distinguishes the Anteaters. Max Hazzard, the long-bombing guard, is the grandson of Walt Hazzard. J.C. Butler is the son of Caron. Spencer Rivers is Doc’s son. Those last two dads are still around. Christian Welp was felled by a heart attack four years ago, at the family vacation home at Hood Canal, Wash. He was only 51. UC Irvine coach Russell Turner spoke Saturday night of the “challenge” he faces in coaching the sons of former pros. “It’s great, it provides accountability,” Turner said. It’s one thing to ignore the unsolicited advice of an accountant or a car mechanic whose son happens to shoot 3-pointers, but when All-Stars speak, the coach generally listens. Christian Welp probably wouldn’t have critiqued Turner’s moves. “If you could ever say a 7-footer is unassuming, that was him,” Emerson said. Yet Welp was also unappreciated. He might have been a major pro if he hadn’t torn up a knee in his third NBA season, but then he won nine championships in nine years in Europe. He remains the leading scorer in University of Washington history, and one night he laid 40 points on Reggie Miller and UCLA. Scott Brooks, perhaps UCI’s best player ever, played with Welp in Philadelphia. “He told me Christian was one of the best teammates he ever had,” Turner said. “I wish I’d known him.” Welp, from Delmenhorst in Germany, actually came to East Bremerton, Wash. as an exchange student and thought he might return after one year. Instead, he followed countryman Detlef Schrempf to Washington and played in three NCAA tournaments and won two Pac-10s titles. The Huskies beat Duke to reach the 1984 Sweet 16, even though Jay Bilas somehow outscored Welp 10-8. They also made a regular-season visit to Duke, in a time when the Cameron Crazies actually gave you a night at the improv and were creatively naughty instead of scripted. With Schrempf on the line, the Dukies began yelling, “Luftball!,” which is airball in German. “He told me that story and all the other ones,” Collin said, smiling. “Growing up, he was my coach and he taught me everything I know, but he was never super-overbearing. When I would play, people might have expected me to be like him and sometimes it was tougher. As I grew, I became my own player. I learned to embrace it.” Four days after Christian died, Collin scored 13 points and got five rebounds in a Class 3-A playoff quarterfinal against Tacoma Lakeside. The fans wore shirts with Christian’s No. 40 on then, just as Emerson did at the Honda Center last weekend. Even Lakeside’s players had “CW 40” on their socks. “Collin shot a lot of 3s back then,” Emerson said. “His dad taught me a lot about footwork, and we worked on it, too, and against Fullerton, I saw him put it into practice. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“Collin didn’t play well Friday night. He said he hadn’t played well against Long Beach State, and maybe that’s because I’m always teasing him because that’s where I went to school. But he told me he was going to play great on Saturday, and you all saw that.” Collin is 6-foot-9 and 215 pounds, stronger after that redshirt season. Turner saw him playing in Anaheim, on Emerson’s AAU team. “Normally you’re sorting through the guys you think you can get,” Turner said. “I took one look at Collin and I said, ‘Yeah, that one. That guy.’ ” “They recruited me and I saw they had a championship tradition,” Welp said. “I just told him, look, take the trip,” Emerson said, laughing. “Just go see it.” Now the growing bandwagon of UCI fans sees Welp. Those who knew the father see both.
20 Mar 19
Press Enterprise
#gallery-1427238-6 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1427238-6 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1427238-6 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1427238-6 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, left, and forward Jonathan Galloway, right, celebrate after Welp scored a basket against Cal State Fullerton during Saturday’s Big West Tournament title game at Honda Center. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine guard Max Hazzard (2) celebrates with forward Collin Welp, right, after Welp made a basket and drew a foul during the second half of the Big West Tournament title game against Cal State Fullerton on Saturday night at Honda Center. UCI won 92-64. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, center, passes around UC Riverside center Menno Dijkstra, left, and forward Zac Watson, right, during the first half of Big West Tournament quarterfinal game last week at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) UCI’s Collin Welp shoots during a nonconference game against Utah State on Dec. 1, 2018 at UCI’s Bren Events Center. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer) UC Irvine’s Collin Welp celebrates after making a 3-pointer against UC Riverside during their Big West Tournament quarterfinal last week at Honda Center. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG) UC Irvine forward Collin Welp, right, is fouled by Long Beach State forward KJ Byers during the first half of their Big West Tournament semifinal last Friday at Honda Center. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong) IRVINE — Collin Welp scored during the Big West Tournament semifinals and the public address announcer said, “Basket by Christian Welp.” In the seats was Melanie, Christian’s widow and Collin’s mom. “That was pretty emotional for her,” said Granville Emerson, Collin’s assistant coach at Seattle Prep High. He was sitting nearby at Honda Center, as UC Irvine rolled to the Big West championship last weekend. The next night, Collin channeled Christian. He went on a 5-for-5 rampage in the second half. He ended up with 23 points, five above his previous high in his redshirt freshman year. The Anteaters beat Cal State Fullerton by 28 points. On Friday in San Jose, they play Kansas State in a first-round game of the NCAA Tournament. “Obviously it was crazy,” Welp said at the Bren Center on Tuesday. “I train hard just to have an impact on games like that. Fullerton had beaten us in the tournament final last year and it was tough. I was just glad to help.” Much is made of the NBA DNA that distinguishes the Anteaters. Max Hazzard, the long-bombing guard, is the grandson of Walt Hazzard. J.C. Butler is the son of Caron. Spencer Rivers is Doc’s son. Those last two dads are still around. Christian Welp was felled by a heart attack four years ago, at the family vacation home at Hood Canal, Wash. He was only 51. UC Irvine coach Russell Turner spoke Saturday night of the “challenge” he faces in coaching the sons of former pros. “It’s great, it provides accountability,” Turner said. It’s one thing to ignore the unsolicited advice of an accountant or a car mechanic whose son happens to shoot 3-pointers, but when All-Stars speak, the coach generally listens. Christian Welp probably wouldn’t have critiqued Turner’s moves. “If you could ever say a 7-footer is unassuming, that was him,” Emerson said. Yet Welp was also unappreciated. He might have been a major pro if he hadn’t torn up a knee in his third NBA season, but then he won nine championships in nine years in Europe. He remains the leading scorer in University of Washington history, and one night he laid 40 points on Reggie Miller and UCLA. Scott Brooks, perhaps UCI’s best player ever, played with Welp in Philadelphia. “He told me Christian was one of the best teammates he ever had,” Turner said. “I wish I’d known him.” Welp, from Delmenhorst in Germany, actually came to East Bremerton, Wash. as an exchange student and thought he might return after one year. Instead, he followed countryman Detlef Schrempf to Washington and played in three NCAA tournaments and won two Pac-10s titles. The Huskies beat Duke to reach the 1984 Sweet 16, even though Jay Bilas somehow outscored Welp 10-8. They also made a regular-season visit to Duke, in a time when the Cameron Crazies actually gave you a night at the improv and were creatively naughty instead of scripted. With Schrempf on the line, the Dukies began yelling, “Luftball!,” which is airball in German. “He told me that story and all the other ones,” Collin said, smiling. “Growing up, he was my coach and he taught me everything I know, but he was never super-overbearing. When I would play, people might have expected me to be like him and sometimes it was tougher. As I grew, I became my own player. I learned to embrace it.” Four days after Christian died, Collin scored 13 points and got five rebounds in a Class 3-A playoff quarterfinal against Tacoma Lakeside. The fans wore shirts with Christian’s No. 40 on then, just as Emerson did at the Honda Center last weekend. Even Lakeside’s players had “CW 40” on their socks. “Collin shot a lot of 3s back then,” Emerson said. “His dad taught me a lot about footwork, and we worked on it, too, and against Fullerton, I saw him put it into practice. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]“Collin didn’t play well Friday night. He said he hadn’t played well against Long Beach State, and maybe that’s because I’m always teasing him because that’s where I went to school. But he told me he was going to play great on Saturday, and you all saw that.” Collin is 6-foot-9 and 215 pounds, stronger after that redshirt season. Turner saw him playing in Anaheim, on Emerson’s AAU team. “Normally you’re sorting through the guys you think you can get,” Turner said. “I took one look at Collin and I said, ‘Yeah, that one. That guy.’ ” “They recruited me and I saw they had a championship tradition,” Welp said. “I just told him, look, take the trip,” Emerson said, laughing. “Just go see it.” Now the growing bandwagon of UCI fans sees Welp. Those who knew the father see both.