Emily Levine

18 May 19
Virtual School Meanderings

A final word today from the neo-liberals. Plugged In May 17, 2019 INACOL HOME PAGE 65 Years On: A Reflection on Brown v. Board and Educational Equity Today marks 65 years since the Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, the seminal civil rights ruling outlawing school segregation. Since the ruling, American public […]

17 May 19
FilmJerk.com

The Early Report features the most detailed listings on the Internet of the independent and foreign films scheduled to be released in the upcoming week, including actual and estimated screen counts, running times and ratings, when available. This week’s report details 19 new openers in theatres (plus new Bollywood and Filipino movie) for the week […]

17 May 19
Daily Republic

May 16– May 16–SACRAMENTO — California lawmakers balked Thursday at cutting taxes on cannabis to help the foundering legal market, while they moved forward a proposal to require more cities to allow pot shops but reduced the number of new stores required. Both bills were aimed at bolstering state-licensed cannabis sales and reducing the black […]

16 May 19
Bait Spot

THE SCANDALOUS DATABASE Written & Directed by: Sara Colangelo Cast (in order of appearance): Peyton Meyer as Trevor Simmons Ted Levine as Principal Lonergan Alfre Woodard as Principal Greysmith Noah Centineo as Donnie Walker Lili Reinhart as Melissa Rothwell Charlie Rowe as Jason Scott Alia Bhatt as Emily Devansh Deepti Gupta as Mrs. Devansh   […]

16 May 19

Author: Alexia Naef (Psychologist) The University of Queensland’s PhD candidate Emily Hielscher has recently released findings from a study looking closely at adolescents and self-harm (See Reference below). The results of a systematic review (An analysis of a collection of historical research studies) found that adolescents who self-harmed lacked self-awareness about their bodies. Hielscher reported […]

15 May 19
Ashbroyale

Emily Ann Roberts Sings “Someday Dream” Live – The Voice Live Top 8 Semi-Final Results SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rREdMMfZT4 : Emily Ann Roberts performs “Someday Dream” in The Voice Live Top 8 Semi-Final Results. » Get The Voice Official App: http://bit.ly/TheVoiceOfficialApp » Subscribe for More: http://bit.ly/TheVoiceSub » Watch The Voice Mondays 8/7c and Tuesdays 9/8c on NBC! […]

15 May 19
Jayontheweb.com

L-R: “The Voice” finalists Andrew Sevener, Gyth Rigdon, Maelyn Jarmon and Dexter Roberts; Trae Patton/NBCOn Tuesday night’s The Voice, host Carson Daly revealed who among the eight semifinalists will be advancing to next week’s finale, based on America’s vote. Three of the top eight artists were voted through by viewers, the two bottom vote-getters were eliminated, and the remaining three sang for an “Instant Save.” Heading into Tuesday night, coach Blake Shelton still had five artists in competition, John Legend had two artists, Kelly Clarkson had one, and Adam Levine had none. At the top of the show, Blake Shelton performed his latest single, “God’s Country.” The top eight then joined Carson onstage to announce, in no particular order, the first artist to advance to the finale. It was Team Legend’s Maelyn Jarmon, who shared a hug with her coach. The next artist saved was Team Blake’s Dexter Roberts, who looked genuinely surprised, despite his string of powerhouse performances. Next, Kelly Clarkson performed a duet of Bob Seger and Martina McBride’s “Chances Are” with her team member, Rod Stokes. The last artist saved by America’s vote was Gyth Rigdon, also from Team Blake. Former Team Blake member, and The Voice season-nine runner-up, Emily Ann Roberts performed her new song, “Someday Dream.” Then came the battle for the Instant Save. Carson announced the three artists who would perform for the right to advance to the finale, voted on by fans on Twitter. Those artists were Andrew Sevener, Rod Stokes and Shawn Sounds, meaning team Blake members Kim Cherry and Carter Lloyd Horne were eliminated. Each of the remaining artists chose their song to perform. Andrew chose “Simple Man” by Lynyrd Skynyrd, a song Blake said afterward he wished Andrew would have saved for the finale. While Blake was confident that Andrew would advance, he promised Andrew it wouldn’t be the end of the road. “If you go home tonight, I want you to go ahead and start packing your bags to come play my venues” said Blake, gladly offering to book Andrew at any of Blake’s Ole Red bars. Rod sang NEEDTOBREATHE’s “Brother.”  After his performance Kelly was wrapped in emotion, saying Rod had the kind of voice she had been dying to sing with her whole life. She joked that before the show Blake jinxed her, predicting she was going to cry, and the jinx worked. Halting her tears, Kelly told Rod that he and his fiancé were terrific people and that Rod had a classic voice that could sing anything from Chris Stapleton to Michael McDonald to Ray Charles. Rod was moved by the praise from his coach, saying that singing with Kelly was a goal accomplished. Shawn Sounds was last, choosing a more upbeat number: “That’s What I Like,” by Bruno Mars. Afterward, John said he felt fortunate to work with someone as musically gifted as Shawn, praising his confidence and hard work during their rehearsals. But when the results were in, it was Andrew Sevener who won the Instant Save, meaning Shawn and Rod were heading home. Next week, The Jonas Brothers and Taylor Swift with Brandon Urie are scheduled to perform for the two night, live Voice finale. Part one of The Voice finale begins Monday at 8 p.m. ET on NBC. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. 

15 May 19
Jayontheweb.com

L-R: “The Voice” finalists Andrew Sevener, Gyth Rigdon, Maelyn Jarmon and Dexter Roberts; Trae Patton/NBCOn Tuesday night’s The Voice, host Carson Daly revealed who among the eight semifinalists will be advancing to next week’s finale, based on America’s vote. Three of the top eight artists were voted through by viewers, the two bottom vote-getters were eliminated, and the remaining three sang for an “Instant Save.” Heading into Tuesday night, coach Blake Shelton still had five artists in competition, John Legend had two artists, Kelly Clarkson had one, and Adam Levine had none. At the top of the show, Blake Shelton performed his latest single, “God’s Country.” The top eight then joined Carson onstage to announce, in no particular order, the first artist to advance to the finale. It was Team Legend’s Maelyn Jarmon, who shared a hug with her coach. The next artist saved was Team Blake’s Dexter Roberts, who looked genuinely surprised, despite his string of powerhouse performances. Next, Kelly Clarkson performed a duet of Bob Seger and Martina McBride’s “Chances Are” with her team member, Rod Stokes. The last artist saved by America’s vote was Gyth Rigdon, also from Team Blake. Former Team Blake member, and The Voice season-nine runner-up, Emily Ann Roberts performed her new song, “Someday Dream.” Then came the battle for the Instant Save. Carson announced the three artists who would perform for the right to advance to the finale, voted on by fans on Twitter. Those artists were Andrew Sevener, Rod Stokes and Shawn Sounds, meaning team Blake members Kim Cherry and Carter Lloyd Horne were eliminated. Each of the remaining artists chose their song to perform. Andrew chose “Simple Man” by Lynyrd Skynyrd, a song Blake said afterward he wished Andrew would have saved for the finale. While Blake was confident that Andrew would advance, he promised Andrew it wouldn’t be the end of the road. “If you go home tonight, I want you to go ahead and start packing your bags to come play my venues” said Blake, gladly offering to book Andrew at any of Blake’s Ole Red bars. Rod sang NEEDTOBREATHE’s “Brother.”  After his performance Kelly was wrapped in emotion, saying Rod had the kind of voice she had been dying to sing with her whole life. She joked that before the show Blake jinxed her, predicting she was going to cry, and the jinx worked. Halting her tears, Kelly told Rod…

14 May 19
GoldDerby
After the Top 8 artists performed on Monday’s episode of “The Voice,” they now await their fate on Tuesday’s results show. Four will move on to next week’s finale for Season 16. Four talented singers will unfortunately be eliminated. For this Top 8, Blake Shelton has an astonishing five of them. It’s possible only one team member goes home and the other four make up the Top 4 finale. More likely, however, is that Kelly Clarkson and/or John Legend will have someone also in the finale. Coach Adam Levine is done for this season. For tonight’s one-hour episode hosted by Carson Daly, here’s how the competition will work: Three contenders will automatically advance forward through public voting. Two will immediately be eliminated on this show. Three will perform for an Instant Save on social media, with just one joining the Top 4 finale next week. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.goldderby.com/article/2019/the-voice-top-8-power-rankings-best-to-worst-season-16/” type=”SEE” target=”_blank”]‘The Voice’ Top 8 power rankings: We rank all 8 remaining artists from best to worst[/pmc-related-link] This is a full list of the Top 8 contenders who performed on Monday: Kim Cherry (Team Blake) — “Together Again” Carter Lloyd Horne (Team Blake) — “Take Me to Church” Maelyn Jarmon (Team John) — “Stay” Gyth Rigdon (Team Blake) — “God Bless the USA” Dexter Roberts (Team Blake) — “Here Without You” Andrew Sevener (Team Blake) — “Long Haired Country Boy” Shawn Sounds (Team John) — “A Song for You” Rod Stokes (Team Kelly) — “Go Rest High on That Mountain” And they also teamed up for duets of hit tunes by The Beatles: Kim and Shawn — “Eleanor Rigby” Maelyn and Rod — “Yesterday” Gyth and Dexter — “Hey Jude” Carter and Andrew — “Help!” And now enjoy making your own comments below in our updating live blog recap for Tuesday, May 14: 9:00 p.m. – The show opened with the man of the season, Blake, performing his song “God’s Country.” The track is darker than the casual fan would be familiar with when it comes to his music, and I’d guess that rock-soul-country crossing over that is common among the contestants on the show may have had some influence on it. 9:05 p.m. – Before getting to the first set of results Carson congratulated Team Legend’s Maelyn as the most streamed artist on Apple Music during the overnight voting period. As such, it was no surprise that the first artist declared safe and moving on to the finale was her! 9:10 p.m. – The second artist that earned enough votes to be named a finalist was Dexter from Team Blake! 9:18 p.m. – For their first performance together, Kelly took the stage with Rod for the Bob Seger and Martina McBride duet “Chances Are.” Like his duet with Maelyn last night, Rod reinforced how great of a pair he is in a male-female duet. Hey, it isn’t easy to sing alongside Kelly, one of the greatest voices of all time, but Rod held his own and sounded great! 9:22 p.m. – The third artist to advance to next week’s finale was Gyth, also from Team Blake! That leaves five artists awaiting their fate, three of which will sing for the Instant Save and two of which will be eliminated outright. 9:28 p.m. – A representative of Team Blake from season 9, Emily Ann Roberts returned to “The Voice” stage to debut her new single “Someday Dream.” It was a very cute performance, mixing well her traditional country sounding voice with a more contemporary arrangement. SEE ‘The Voice’ winners: Where are they now (Season 1 – 15)? 9:32 p.m. – With the five remaining artists on stage, Carson named the three that polled in the middle of the pack and would sing for the Instant Save: Shawn, Rod and Andrew! That means Carter and Kim both received the lowest amount of support overnight and were eliminated. 9:40 p.m. – Andrew performed first with “Simple Man” by Lynyrd Skynyrd. With his guitar and the mic only, it was the perfect vibe and song selection for the Save. He presented grit and a textured rock vocal that actually would have made for a great Monday night performance! 9:43 p.m. – Second to sing was Rod with “Brother” by NEEDTOBREATHE. The inspirational track was also a smart choice because it easily draws people in because of it’s subject matter of supporting one another. It certainly wasn’t Rod’s best performance of the competition, but he had a really nice moment at the end when the music dropped and he sang a cappella briefly. 9:47 p.m. – And last to sing was Shawn with the Bruno Mars song “That’s What I Like.” The uptempo song was a departure from what we’re used to from Shawn, but it was nice to see him show another side of himself as an artist. But he definitely looked the part in his outfit and worked the stage from side to side with tons of confidence. 9:51 p.m. – When the cut to commercial break began we saw a glimpse of how the live Twitter votes were shaping up: Andrew was in an early lead with 40% of the vote with Shawn and Rod trailing at 30% each. As the break continued, Andrew increased his lead by a few points. 9:55 p.m. – After a round of thanks to their coaches the guys found out the results. The fourth and final artist to enter next weeks’ finale was Andrew! That’s three finalists for Blake and one for John and ends Kelly’s hopes at the threepeat. SEE ‘The Voice’ Top 8 Instant Save: Was right artist rescued by viewers of season 16? [POLL] Make “The Voice” predictions for who will advance and who will be eliminated. Also, be sure to make your predictions to influence our reality TV racetrack odds for “Survivor,” “American Idol,” “RuPaul’s Drag Race” and more. You can keep changing your predictions until just each episode airs. You’ll compete to win a spot on our leaderboard and eternal bragging rights. See our contest rules and sound off with other fans in our reality TV forum. Read more Gold Derby entertainment news. SEE ‘The Voice’ Top 4: Rank the artists competing to win season 16 [POLL]
13 May 19
The Daily Hatch

____ 250 × 272Images may be subject to copyright. Learn More Johnny Cash – God’s Gonna Cut You Down DUNCAN MACLEOD MAY 15, 2007 Johnny Cash’s version of the traditional God’s Gonna Cut You Down, from the album “American V: A Hundred Highways”, was released as a music video on November 9 2006, just over three […]

12 May 19
Viral Topic Zone

White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow said China and the U.S. will both suffer from tariffs. | Evan Vucci/AP Photo TWO BITES OF NEWS FROM THE SUNDAY SHOWS … — THE WHITE HOUSE MESSAGE ON TARIFFS … CHRIS WALLACE spoke with LARRY KUDLOW on “FOX NEWS SUNDAY”: WALLACE: “[The Chinese] may suffer consequences, but […]

12 May 19
Go News Viral

White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow said China and the U.S. will both suffer from tariffs. | Evan Vucci/AP Photo TWO BITES OF NEWS FROM THE SUNDAY SHOWS … — THE WHITE HOUSE MESSAGE ON TARIFFS … CHRIS WALLACE spoke with LARRY KUDLOW on “FOX NEWS SUNDAY”: WALLACE: “[The Chinese] may suffer consequences, but […]

12 May 19
viral news reports

White House chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow said China and the U.S. will both suffer from tariffs. | Evan Vucci/AP Photo TWO BITES OF NEWS FROM THE SUNDAY SHOWS … — THE WHITE HOUSE MESSAGE ON TARIFFS … CHRIS WALLACE spoke with LARRY KUDLOW on “FOX NEWS SUNDAY”: WALLACE: “[The Chinese] may suffer consequences, but […]

12 May 19
Daily Republic

May 12– May 12—May 17 All Creatures Here Below A couple on the run from police in L.A. wind up in Kansas City. With Karen Gillan, David Dastmalchian, Jennifer Morrison, David Koechner, Richard Cabral, John Doe. Written by Dastmalchian. Directed by Collin Schiffli. (1:31) NR. Amaurosis A couple find themselves in a dark place following […]

12 May 19
The Denver Post
During a 6 a.m. news conference the day after Colorado’s latest school shooting, District Attorney George Brauchler made a point of declaring the tragedies that have rocked the area in recent years don’t define the “kind, compassionate, caring people” who live here. “If you had suggested to anyone behind me or in this room that, within 20 years in 20 miles, we would have dealt with Columbine, the Aurora theater, Arapahoe High School, the shooting of Zack Parrish and four other deputies, we’d have thought you mad,” he said. “And yet here we are again.” Tuesday’s shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch, which ended with one student dead, eight others injured and two of their classmates in custody, prompted Coloradans to once again question whether these types of mass shootings are more prevalent here than elsewhere. Click image to enlarge School shootings and mass shootings — where more than four people were hurt or killed, not counting the shooter — are both still quite rare in the United States, and the vast majority of people will never directly experience one. Yet both have, in fact, occurred in higher numbers in the Denver metro area, compared to population, over the past 20 years than in most large American metropolitan areas. The Census-designated Denver metropolitan statistical area has had more school shootings, per million people, than any of the country’s 24 other largest metro areas since 1999, according to an analysis of multiple shooting databases by The Denver Post. The metro area also had the third-most mass shootings, by population, over that period, with only the Seattle and Orlando areas seeing more large-scale shootings. Colorado as a whole had the fifth-highest rate of mass shootings, by population, compared to the other 49 states and the District of Columbia, and the 10th-highest rate of school shootings. George Brauchler, the district attorney for Colorado’s 18th Judicial District, discusses the case against the accused STEM School Highlands Ranch shooters at the Douglas County Courthouse in Castle Rock on May 8, 2019. Braucher — who will prosecute the teen suspects in the STEM School shooting — characterized Colorado’s string of mass shooting as “aberrant acts.” “The problem is, when you get three, four or five of them within a 20-mile radius, you begin to think they’re less aberrant,” he said. “But I’m here to tell you this is not who we are.” Click image to enlarge. The 1999 attack at Columbine High School, while far from the first school shooting, captured the country’s imagination because of the number of fatalities — 12 students and a teacher — and the lurid details that emerged about the shooters’ plans. The 2013 Aurora theater shooting, carried out at a cineplex during a late-night screening of a popular movie, also made headlines nationwide for weeks with a toll that included 12 dead and more than 70 injured. RELATED: STEM School shooting lasted 14 minutes. Here’s what we know happened in that time. But the Denver metro area also has endured smaller-scale tragedies, including the 2013 shooting death of Claire Davis at Arapahoe High School and the death of Parrish and the wounding of six other law enforcement officers and neighbors in an ambush shooting in 2017. Experts are divided on why the Denver area would have more shootings than other large metropolitan areas, with some believing that previous shootings could cause a “contagion” that inspires other people to kill, and others wondering whether Colorado has simply suffered more random misfortune than other states. The Columbine massacre still casts a long shadow, and people who become obsessed with the shooting have raised alarms when they come to Colorado for “inspiration,” said Adam Lankford, a professor of criminology who studies mass shootings at the University of Alabama. An 18-year-old Florida woman who triggered a manhunt and the closure of hundreds of schools in April was the most recent example of that phenomenon, he said. It’s not clear if local youth are as affected by the area’s dark history, Lankford said. A few shooters in Colorado have expressed admiration for the Columbine gunmen, but so have mass murderers as far away as Germany. “We can only be certain of that in cases where the offender admits it, or leaves behind some sort of explanation,” he said. The day following a shooting at the STEM School Highlands Ranch a sign displays “OUR HEARTS ARE WITH YOU STEM” at Columbine High School outside Littleton on May 8, 2019. Sherry Towers, the lead of author of a study that found the odds of a second shooting were higher for an average of 13 days after one high-profile shooting, said the researchers didn’t find any evidence of geographic clustering in contagion. In other words, a shooter could just as easily inspire a copycat across the country as down the road. Some areas did have more mass shootings than others, and while some of that is explained by higher rates of gun ownership, it’s not entirely clear what other factors could be driving the difference, she said. Since Columbine, there have been four more widely publicized school shootings in Colorado, including Tuesday’s mass shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch. In a handful of other Colorado cases, one student shot another because of a personal dispute, and those are classified as school shootings because they occurred on a K-12 campus. Peter Langman, a Philadelphia psychologist who tracks school shootings, said several of Colorado’s post-1999 school shootings appeared to have nothing in common with Columbine. In 2006, an adult man killed a 16-year-old student at Platte Canyon High School in Bailey, and in 2010 a man who was later ruled insane shot and wounded two students outside Deer Creek Middle School in Littleton. Left: Candles light up the night during a vigil held in memory of Emily Keyes on September 27, 2007. The vigil was held to mark the one-year anniversary of when Keyes killed by a gunman who held several female students hostage at Platte Canyon High School in Bailey. Right: Math teacher David Benke, left, greets student Kaela Levine, 12, as she arrives to Deer Creek Middle School for the first time since two students were shot by an intruder on Feb. 23, 2010. Benke jumped on the gunman and helped to hold him until authorities arrived. “I’m left with wondering if it’s just coincidence or bad luck,” he said. Pennsylvania and Ohio both have seen more school shootings than Colorado, but it may not seem that way because they haven’t generated as much attention, Langman said. Both states also have larger populations, meaning their rates are lower. “I think everyone’s acutely aware of the Denver area because of Columbine,” he said. “Anything that happens there is going to be noticed in a way that another shooting in Ohio or Pennsylvania isn’t.” Ultimately, it’s nearly impossible to be sure if a place is at a higher risk going forward, said Frank Farley, a professor of psychological studies in education at Temple University in Pennsylvania. If Columbine did place the Denver area at a higher risk for future shootings, the only thing parents and schools can do is consider responses, like increasing school security and reducing access to weapons, he said. “Your region seems to be a candidate (for contagion) and that’s very scary, of course,” he said. “How you all handle it could become a model.” In the wake of the latest shooting, parents are once again having to consider how to respond. Michael and Desiree Davis, the parents of Claire, at left, hold up candles with thousands of others at the celebration of life memorial service held for their daughter at the National Western Stock Show Event Center in Denver on Jan. 1, 2014. Thousands of friends, family, students, and members of Claire’s equestrian community turned out to pay tribute to Claire. Rachel Moore has two kids, a 12-year-old son and a 10-year-old daughter, in Littleton Public Schools. Her son’s best friend goes to STEM School, and she said she’s tried to balance not making false promises to protect them from everything, while also not scaring them. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”curated” curated_ids=”3454557,3454138,3454153,3453281″] Her son was five when 26 people, many of them children about his age, were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, and both children have grown up with lockdowns and active-shooter drills, Moore said. She doesn’t feel totally secure sending her children to school here, but there are few truly safe places anywhere, she said. “It’s gotten to the point where schools are dangerous, but now I’m like, well, if I go to a movie theater or a mall, there’s nowhere I can go or take my kids where they’re going to be totally safe from that kind of violence,” she said. “We go to church, so we come at it from a faith standpoint. You can only do your best.”