Emotions

21 Jan 19
Becoming

There’s this whirlpool turning in my stomach. I can’t seem to shake it. It’s not a feeling I think I could ever get used to. The cell of this prison is sealed shut and there is no chance of escape in sight.  I feel helpless and confused. I can’t find the cause or the cure. […]

21 Jan 19
To God be The glory, Amen

Our existence? Rejoicing in hope; patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer. Amen. Paul continues to describe our lives in Christ in a series of related short commands. The three commands in this verse are key to the emotional and spiritual well-being of every Christian.  The first command to Christians is to rejoice in hope. […]

21 Jan 19
Carmine meo

The Walrus Foundation’s mission statement asserts that our mandate is to promote debate on matters vital to Canadians. This magazine is one way we do it—but it is only one. On September 16, for example, close to 450 people attended an event at Calgary’s Theatre Junction Grand called the Walrus Talks Philanthropy. It was the […]

21 Jan 19
News Time Global

For better or for worse, racket-breaking is as inescapable an element of the sport as forehands and backhands, often revealing frustration, sometimes reversing the course of a contest.

21 Jan 19
The Irish Sun
WOLVES manager Nuno Espirito Santo has been charged with misconduct by the FA for running onto the pitch to celebrate his sides win on Saturday. The former goalkeeper ran onto the pitch after Wolves striker Diogo Jota scored a 93rd minute winner against Leicester as the game ended 4-3. Nuno Espirito Santo was sent to the stands after Wolves scored an incredible winner against Leicester Jota completed his hat-trick with the last ditch winner which prompted  Nuno to run on the pitch and join his players in celebrations. Today the FA have charged the Wolves boss of misconduct and could face a touchline ban or a fine. Nuno has until 6pm on Thursday to respond to the FA. The FA said: “Nuno Espírito Santo has been charged with misconduct relating to his behaviour in the 93rd minute of the game between Wolves and Leicester on Saturday. “He has until 6pm on January 24 (Thursday) to respond to the charge.” The Wolves boss came onto the pitch and celebrated with his players Nuno Espirito Santo has now been charged by the FA for misconduct After the game, Nuno claimed there was ‘no explanation’ for his actions, as he was sent off following his pitch invasion. Nuno said: “There is no explanation. “After all the situations in the game, to finish the game like that brings tremendous happiness for everyone in Molineux. I’m no exception. “The referee explained to me what happened. It was clear, and it was a good decision. “You are not allowed to go out of your technical area, even to celebrate. The Wolves manager twice committed the offence last season “It’s a very difficult moment, especially as the game was up and down. “It is difficult to contain your emotions. It is the law. It has happened before with other managers.” It is not the first time Nuno has committed the offence, as last season he was sent off twice – against Bolton at Molineux and away at Bristol City.
21 Jan 19
Carla's Journey to Health

Follow my full story from the beginning: Loving Abuse 1: Who Am I or my personal journeys via my video diary. John 3:16 [Full Chapter] For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. 7/31/2018 @ 3:00pm Today is […]

21 Jan 19
The Catholic Spoonie

That seems a bit pessimistic doesn’t it? If not straight up illogical? After all – it’s better to be mostly put together then irreparable isn’t it? That’s what I though too, a friend is to blame for this thought stewing in my head for several months now though, they told me “You need to break […]

21 Jan 19
Marie Scarles

As an interdisciplinary research fellow at Rutgers University–Camden, I have a chance to work with scholars, professors, and texts outside the boundaries of the English department and MFA program. Over the next semester, I’ll be working with History department Chair Dr. Lorrin Thomas to examine the material histories of the 20th-century United States. I’ll be […]

21 Jan 19
readandbeheard

Seriously…even Wonder Woman needs a break sometimes. A few minutes, hours, days, weeks, months to be ridiculous and not feel the need to live up to everyone else’s expectations of her. She’s just a Woman even if she’s Wonderful. Now it’s easy to falter and fall and not get back up on the pedestal but […]

21 Jan 19
The Denver Post
MELBOURNE, Australia — Way behind in a match he soon would lose, Alexander Zverev leaned forward in his Australian Open sideline seat to repeatedly, and violently, crack his racket against the court with a reverberating THWACK — one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight times in all, before throwing down the offending, and now-mangled, piece of equipment. Caused quite a, well, racket. “I heard it,” said Zverev’s opponent Monday, 2016 Wimbledon finalist Milos Raonic. “I don’t think I looked over. I think it was pretty clear what was going on.” It certainly was not unusual. Smashing, spiking, bouncing or otherwise harming rackets is the most public form of anger, um, mismanagement in professional tennis, done all the time by all kinds of players, whether they are men or women, famous or unknown, seeded or otherwise, winning or losing. Over the first week of the Australian Open, Naomi Osaka, Dominic Thiem,Ryan Harrison and Daniil Medvedev, just to name a few, joined Zverev in producing GIF-worthy outbursts. For better or for worse, racket-breaking is as inescapable an element of the sport as forehands and backhands, often revealing frustration, sometimes reversing the course of a contest, usually resulting in a fine of thousands of dollars, and even — as was the case with Serena Williams during her U.S. Open final loss to Osaka last September — occasionally costing a player a point (in Williams’ case, because of an earlier warning). “I love it!” exclaimed Henri Leconte, the 1988 French Open runner-up. “I mean, sure, it’s not good for kids to see,” he said. “But sometimes, it’s very important to show emotion. … In my generation, we had so many players who did that: John McEnroe was doing it a lot; Goran Ivanisevic was breaking rackets. Sometimes, when you see your opponent doing that, you say: ‘Oh, he’s really upset. That’s good.’ But if you were playing McEnroe, you were in trouble, because he played better afterward.” Current players will cite McEnroe or Andy Roddick or Marat Safin, among others, when the subject is raised. They’ll talk about all-time classic displays, such as three-time major champion Stan Wawrinka’s signature move of bending a racket in half over his knee, the way a Major League Baseball slugger might try to break a bat. Or Marcos Baghdatis reaching into his bag for additional rackets during a changeover at the 2012 Australian Open (in a match against Wawrinka), until he’d slammed four and discarded them. Or Benoit Paire and his multiple-racket, sitting-then-standing tantrum (in a match against Baghdatis) that drew $16,500 in fines, more than double his prize money from last year’s Washington tournament. “If we see a guy break a racket, someone will say to me, ‘Ah, yours was better,'” said Baghdatis, the 2006 runner-up in Melbourne. “There are worse things. For me, it’s something that it’s fun to see. It’s good for tennis. There is some character and it should be like that,” he said. “You have a bad day at the office, (and) you have a fight with your wife. You have a fight with your brother, your mother, your sister, your father. It’s the way life is. Sometimes you have bad days and it just comes out.” Leconte is hardly the only one who wonders about what sort of example is being set for children who are watching, especially those who play tennis. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “It’s become all too commonplace. And it seems like other players see it happening and they think, ‘Oh, this is OK to do.’ I think it’s bad modeling, and the rackets are obviously expensive,” said Tracy Austin, the 1979 and 1981 U.S. Open champion. “Emoting is good. We want to see personalities. But actually being destructive is not helpful for anybody.” Ernests Gulbis, a former top-10 player known for raising racket abuse to an art form, says he wishes he could avoid ever doing it again. He also admits that’s not likely. “Sometimes the emotions just take over. It’s a fight. It’s like a gladiator fight. It’s not like you’re laying in bed and can just be relaxed,” Gulbis said. “Emotions just come out. I’m against it, personally, because you can fix your problems on court in a different way. But to be honest, sometimes it helps.” That’s a popular take. “It made me feel better. I was very angry, so I let my anger out,” Zverev said Monday. Didn’t do him a bit of good on the scoreboard, though. He was trailing Raonic 6-1, 4-1 when he destroyed his racket at a changeover, then proceeded to drop the next two games and the third set, too. But Osaka, who’ll play in the quarterfinals Wednesday, did appear to get a boost from her racket fling while losing the opening set of what became a three-set victory. “For me, I tend to keep a lot of things bottled up. I just felt like in that moment, sort of releasing it was easier than just keeping it inside,” Osaka said, “and then maybe I would have dwelled on it for longer.” Top-ranked Novak Djokovic is a firm believer that the direction of a match can change with a well-timed to-do. So the 14-time Grand Slam champion is hardly shy about chucking the tool of his trade when the inspiration strikes. “At times in my career, these kind of situations, when I would scream or throw a racket, it would kind of wake me up and help me to just kind of free myself from that pressure that is just building throughout the match,” Djokovic said. “But there are times when it doesn’t help.” Crowd reactions vary. Fans are sometimes seen begging a player to hand over a messed-up racket as a keepsake. Yet when Djokovic shattered a frame by pounding it against the French Open’s red clay last year, spectators whistled and booed. “I’m not proud of doing that, to be honest. I don’t like doing that,” he said. “But at times, it happens.”
21 Jan 19
Volkish

But such is not the compassion which actuates Arjuna in the rejection of his work and mission. That is not compassion but an impotence full of a weak self-pity, a recoil from the mental suffering which his act must entail on himself,—“I see not what shall thrust from me the sorrow that dries up the […]

21 Jan 19
RachelWdesigns

How did we get into this mess?  Man  What’s going on here?  The video is showing how we consume and cause the destruction of other beings.  What do you see that makes you think that?  In the way the cartoon man is changing the states of the these animals from a living being to something […]

21 Jan 19
The Sun
WOLVES manager Nuno Espirito Santo has been charged with misconduct by the FA for running onto the pitch to celebrate his sides win on Saturday. The former goalkeeper ran onto the pitch after Wolves striker Diogo Jota scored a 93rd minute winner against Leicester as the game ended 4-3. Nuno Espirito Santo was sent to the stands after Wolves scored an incredible winner against Leicester Jota completed his hat-trick with the last ditch winner which prompted  Nuno to run on the pitch and join his players in celebrations. Today the FA have charged the Wolves boss of misconduct and could face a touchline ban or a fine. Nuno has until 6pm on Thursday to respond to the FA. The FA said: “Nuno Espírito Santo has been charged with misconduct relating to his behaviour in the 93rd minute of the game between Wolves and Leicester on Saturday. “He has until 6pm on January 24 (Thursday) to respond to the charge.” The Wolves boss came onto the pitch and celebrated with his players Nuno Espirito Santo has now been charged by the FA for misconduct After the game, Nuno claimed there was ‘no explanation’ for his actions, as he was sent off following his pitch invasion. Nuno said: “There is no explanation. “After all the situations in the game, to finish the game like that brings tremendous happiness for everyone in Molineux. I’m no exception. “The referee explained to me what happened. It was clear, and it was a good decision. “You are not allowed to go out of your technical area, even to celebrate. The Wolves manager twice committed the offence last season “It’s a very difficult moment, especially as the game was up and down. “It is difficult to contain your emotions. It is the law. It has happened before with other managers.” It is not the first time Nuno has committed the offence, as last season he was sent off twice – against Bolton at Molineux and away at Bristol City.
21 Jan 19
Upendra Ghintala

तुम इतना जो मुस्कुरा रहे हो, क्या गम है जिसको छुपा रहे हो This line is a very famous line from the song of Jagjit Singh and this is today’s reality. I have been working for more than 4 years and it has been more than 10 years living alone. Whenever I see people around […]

21 Jan 19
bookish_heights

Thank you, Edelweiss+ and the publisher for the chance to read this novel! Title: 99 Percent Mine Author: Sally Thorne Release date: 29/01/19 Genre: Adult contemporary romance My Rating: 4 stars Trigger/content warnings: Instance of unwanted sexual advances/physical contact at the beginning, grief (with talks of loss) and our main character has a serious heart condition. Synopsis from Goodreads: […]