Engagements

20 Mar 19

With the billion people that fill this world if you dont know who you are you may find yourself lost, trying to find yourself. If you can’t look in the mirror and know who it is staring back you may find yourself lost. If you think about a new year and have no idea of […]

23 Mar 19
Karen Reads and Recommends

The Clouds Beyond Us by Rahf AlRashidi – Blog Blitz 22-24th March 2019. I was gifted a copy of this book for the Blog Blitz. Thank you to Fraser’s Fun House for the opportunity. Synopsis A beautiful and eclectic mix of stories and poetry, as presented by new and exciting author Rahf AlRashidi. This collection […]

23 Mar 19
The Orkney News

“In addition, developing the next generation of water leaders will bring fresh perspectives on cutting edge science and supports the wider ambition to enhance Scotland’s talent base.”

23 Mar 19
Samantha Rey

   November 10, 2018 will forever be the best day of our lives. I got to marry the man of my absolute dreams with our closest friends and family around us. I have found the time to finally sit down and gather my thoughts and feelings from this big day. Not only is this blog […]

23 Mar 19
Interactive Narrative Media 2019

1.Define Hudson’s ideas of “Disparate Agency” and “Unified Agency” and give an example for both. Hudson’s ideas of agency in a game revolves around what control of the story the player has versus what the character has. In more accurate terms, Disparate Agency is where the player’s agency is a ‘subset of the character’s agency’, […]

23 Mar 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
“The machines will become, in time, more compact. They will become the pride of smaller and smaller institutions, the playthings of more and more of the privileged. They will no longer retain mere symbols in an arbitrary system, but something which can pass, at least, for whole experiences … When the machines become small enough so that every person can have—then must have—his own, the day will be celebrated as the new age of The Individual.” W. S. Merwin wrote that, in the 1960s, in a prophetic fable called “The Remembering Machines of Tomorrow.” Merwin, widely considered the preeminent American poet of our time, died last week, at 91, at his home in Hawaii. He was not a popular poet in the way of, say, Maya Angelou or Billy Collins or Mary Oliver, probably because his writings demand of the reader an active engagement, often with uncomfortable truths that grow more mysterious the more deeply you consider them. His poems work at an intimate, preconscious, almost subverbal level, seeming to express the inexpressible—one of the primary gifts of poetry and one of the reasons his poems aren’t always easy, do not serve up homilies predigested for the reader’s convenience. Merwin had a long and varied career ranging through many styles and genres over some 70 years of prodigious production as a poet, fabulist, essayist, memoirist, and translator from several languages. In his generation of outstanding American poets, Merwin stood out for his dreamlike imagination, his intellectual and spiritual restlessness, his independence, never associating with a school or movement, never teaching at a university, relentlessly advancing a singular creative practice. He was a pacifist who counseled draft resisters during the Vietnam War, spoke and wrote eloquently for the nonhuman environment long before environmentalism went mainstream, and in his later years on Maui planted a conservancy of endangered palm trees. Toward the end, with the loss of his wife and his eyesight, and in our current political and ecological nightmare, he must have been profoundly heartbroken, even though in his last book, “Garden Time,” the poems radiate almost serene gratitude for the everyday revelations of the natural and cultivated landscape. I discovered Merwin’s book “The Moving Target” in the Beverly Hills Public Library in 1965 when I was 18. He was the first contemporary poet whose work captivated me. I didn’t quite “get” what he was getting at, and its elusiveness was part of its appeal. The language was enchanting, but not in a way that called attention to itself, or to the poet’s craftiness (though formally he was a virtuoso). From then on I read almost every subsequent volume as they appeared, always amazed and inspired by his uncanny powers of observation and invention. In the poetry world, there were differences of opinion between those, like me, who were in awe of him, and those who deemed his work too vague, too abstract, facile, overrated. For me, he was an example of the best of what a poet could be—not just for the beauty and strangeness of his voice but for his incorruptible integrity. We first met when he visited Bard College in 1967, and our paths crossed from time to time in subsequent decades, most often in Santa Cruz, where he was a regular guest of George Hitchcock. In 1981, on one of his tours in the Bay Area, I served as his driver. When I picked him up at SFO, as it happened there was a historical exhibition in the terminal about poets and poetry. He said to me, “Do you think we’re becoming respectable, Stephen?” Ever the wise guy, overcorrecting for hero worship, I said, “It’s too late for you.” Now, in the timelessness of his work and his present absence, I’m confident that he will be remembered by anyone alive who has truly engaged with his writings, and by whoever discovers them in what survives of the human future. Stephen Kessler is the author of “Moving Targets: On Poets, Poetry and Translation.”
22 Mar 19
Pete's Corner

Disclaimer: I’m not intending this post to shame anyone or asking anyone to remove Facebook, or any apps for that matter, from their phone. I wanted to share why I, personally, removed the platform from my phone. However, I do invite all to think about the consequences that come from living life through a 5.45 […]

22 Mar 19
Being better prepared for the next hurricane to come in North Carolina

Yesterday my colleagues and I were visiting areas in North Carolina, that were very heavily impacted by Hurricane Florence. The devastation was still tremendous, although it was already 6 months after the storm. The area was hit by two major century Hurricanes in two years. 2016 by Hurricane Mathew and 2018 by Hurricane Florence, while […]

22 Mar 19
World Site News

Prime Minister Narendra Modi with his Pakistani counterpart Imran Khan. (File)On a day the NDA government decided to boycott the Pakistan National Day reception at its High Commission’s lawns, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan disclosed that he had received a message from Prime Minister Narendra Modi where he said that it is time that people…

22 Mar 19

In “The Untapped Generation: The Classroom As Training Ground for Future Leaders,” I argued Christian schools should equip students to solve problems from a biblical worldview framework. Our nation’s future and the success or failure as a nation will be determined by how this generation solves problems, and from within what worldview these future leaders […]

22 Mar 19
The Life of Young 909

There are countless stories of those people who would go to freelancer websites and begin writing for others and earning tons of cash on the internet. People have started eBay businesses and became power sellers in a ridiculously short amount of time. Also, people have also tried paid surveys. In 1908, there were 88 car […]

22 Mar 19
The Journaling of Husted 752

The world too seems to be designed based on this principle and it is for this reason that everyone is given different gifts which makes the personality of each person unique. 1). There are no guarantees that you’ll win over 100% of the people you approach, no matter how authentic and sincere you might be. […]