Erik Karlsson

25 May 19
SPS PROMOTORES

Good article , thanks and we want https://www.whatsappforpcz.com The man is the true definition of an impenetrable wall. Baker has the fluidity and quickness to play in a man scheme, but his instincts fit best in a Cover-2 or zone-heavy defense. But the upgrades would extend into the summer, as the Sharks made their pitch […]

25 May 19
Gordie Howe Classic

Game 4 – With their backs against the wall, the Stars kept the play mostly in the visitors end, outshooting Vancouver 15-6 in the first period, but the biggest roar came from section 13, the section with the Canucks wives & family as Evgeni Dadonov scored for a 2-1 Lead after 20 minutes! Alex Galchenyuk […]

25 May 19
New York City Ticketron

The New York Rangers have cap space to add several impact players and Jacob Trouba could be exactly what the team needs. The New York Rangers are uniquely positioned to add to their roster this offseason as they have a projected $19 million in cap space per CapFriendly. They also have the second overall pick, […]

25 May 19
Gordie Howe Classic

Game 3 – The pre-game hype was all about Canuck Goalie Tukka Rask, who had held the Stars to just one Goal in each of the Vancouver Wins at home! The Game 3 crowd at American Airlines Arena sat silent, as the Canucks did something that hasnt been done all season in Texas, they came […]

25 May 19
New York City Ticketron

The New York Rangers have cap space to add several impact players and Jacob Trouba could be exactly what the team needs. The New York Rangers are uniquely positioned to add to their roster this offseason as they have a projected $19 million in cap space per CapFriendly. They also have the second overall pick, […]

25 May 19
Puck77

Welcome to Clearing the Puck! Your weekly look at the world of hockey from the week of May 19th-May 25th. This week we look back on the Blues advancing to the Stanley Cup final, the Ottawa Senators have a new head coach and there’s a team who isn’t good but they know it. Incase this […]

25 May 19
Sports Radio Service

photo from wbur.org: Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask stops a penalty shot by Columbus Blue Jackets forward Boone Jenner during Game 4 of their second-round series. On the Stanley Cup Final podcast with Joe: #1 The San Jose Sharks’ season ended last week as the players cleaned out their lockers the discussion of free agency […]

24 May 19
NESN.com

[nesn_embed service=dailymotion src=”https://www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/x796nw5?autoPlay=1″ width=”480″ height=”270″] Could Erik Karlsson’s first year with the San Jose Sharks also be his last? No one knows for sure at the moment, but one of his most recent tweets certainly is raising some eyebrows. The Sharks still are less than a week out from losing to the St. Louis Blues […]

24 May 19
NFL Football news24

The big-name defenseman is set to become an unrestricted free agent this summer Here

24 May 19
NYR News

While on the radio this week John Davidson was asked about being active in free agency and said “I think it has to make sense.” He said, “if you are going to bring in an older free agent and give him a long-term contract when your team isn’t ready for it it’s not good for […]

24 May 19
FOREVER BLUESHIRTS

Karlsson tweet sounds like a goodbye to SJ.

24 May 19
Paradise Post
Even though I haven’t coached this century, except for coaching my boys to a bronze medal at 2014 Western Canadian U18 Ball Hockey Championships, I still have some coaching habits. I always like to watch a game a second time the next day. When Todd McLellan coached the Sharks, he allowed me to join him the next morning to watch the game with the coaches. I loved that; I didn’t love waking up at 5:30 to do it though. Even to this day as a broadcaster, I will re-watch the game I called the night before — with the sound muted, of course. It’s a great exercise. It allows a clearer, more detached, more impartial view of the game. Watching a game live, the emotion and drama in the heat of the moment can cloud anybody’s analytical skills. So after watching the Sharks again bow out of the 2019 playoffs I can affirm Peter DeBoer’s remarks after Game 6 in St. Louis. The 5-1 score was not reflective of the effort the Sharks dispensed. They did make the Blues “earn it.” Effort, work, heart. Use whatever word you want. The Sharks displayed a ton of it. Not just in the final game, missing three of their top performers, but throughout the entire playoff run. I know that does not ease the disappointment of seeing your team bow out so frustratingly close to another Stanley Cup Final. The look on Joe Thornton’s face said it all, a heartbreaking contemplation of coming so close while still being so far away It is simple to break down the St. Louis series. The punishment the Blues dished out game after game worked to perfection. Exhibit A: No Pavelski, No Hertl, No Karlsson for part of Game 5 and all of Game 6. The Sharks offense was stymied by an imposing defenseive core and dedicated backtracking forwards. Do you remember any odd man attacks the Sharks were able to generate? Yeah, neither do I. Time and space were luxuries the Sharks did not have. When they did find a sliver of space and got a chance on net, the Blues brilliant rookie tender, Jordan Binnington, made saves that disguised and defied his rookie status. The healthier, better executing team won. I don’t think there is any shame in that if your team gave every ounce of energy in opposition. You can be confident the Sharks “maxed out.” They competed hard but didn’t have enough. It’s a hard pill to swallow. One of the great American writers and orators from the 1800’s, Robert Ingersoll, wrote:“The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing heart.” The Sharks didn’t lose heart. They displayed courage and took their defeat as they have won and lost all year — as a team. But this will not be the team when the Sharks return to the ice next September. With the end of the playoffs comes the very tough offseason where it’s very likely that some of your favorite Sharks will become your favorite former Sharks. GM Doug Wilson has some very busy days and sleepless nights ahead.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] According to CapFriendly, the Sharks have 15 players signed for a total of  $58,296,667. That leaves $24,703,333, based on the salary cap going up to $83 million. The good news is that Doug has done a good job locking up key players to contracts with good term and respectable salaries relative to the rest of the league. Brent Burns, Logan Couture, Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Martin Jones and Evander Kane are locked up. Doug will need to address his restricted free agents. Timo Meier — 30 goals at 22 years old — has without a doubt earned himself a big raise. He’s probably looking at something north of $6 million per year and a term of 4 or 5 years. Kevin LaBanc, Joakim Ryan and Dylan Gambrell will shrink the cap space by an estimated $12-13 million. Then there are the unrestricted free agents, those who can leave: The big three, Erik Karlsson and two of the greatest Sharks of all time, Joe Pavelski and Jumbo Joe Thornton. Add Gus Nyquist, Joonas Donskoi and Micheal Hayley… the numbers simply cannot be crunched enough. That is the biggest heartbreak of all.
24 May 19
The Reporter
Even though I haven’t coached this century, except for coaching my boys to a bronze medal at 2014 Western Canadian U18 Ball Hockey Championships, I still have some coaching habits. I always like to watch a game a second time the next day. When Todd McLellan coached the Sharks, he allowed me to join him the next morning to watch the game with the coaches. I loved that; I didn’t love waking up at 5:30 to do it though. Even to this day as a broadcaster, I will re-watch the game I called the night before — with the sound muted, of course. It’s a great exercise. It allows a clearer, more detached, more impartial view of the game. Watching a game live, the emotion and drama in the heat of the moment can cloud anybody’s analytical skills. So after watching the Sharks again bow out of the 2019 playoffs I can affirm Peter DeBoer’s remarks after Game 6 in St. Louis. The 5-1 score was not reflective of the effort the Sharks dispensed. They did make the Blues “earn it.” Effort, work, heart. Use whatever word you want. The Sharks displayed a ton of it. Not just in the final game, missing three of their top performers, but throughout the entire playoff run. I know that does not ease the disappointment of seeing your team bow out so frustratingly close to another Stanley Cup Final. The look on Joe Thornton’s face said it all, a heartbreaking contemplation of coming so close while still being so far away It is simple to break down the St. Louis series. The punishment the Blues dished out game after game worked to perfection. Exhibit A: No Pavelski, No Hertl, No Karlsson for part of Game 5 and all of Game 6. The Sharks offense was stymied by an imposing defenseive core and dedicated backtracking forwards. Do you remember any odd man attacks the Sharks were able to generate? Yeah, neither do I. Time and space were luxuries the Sharks did not have. When they did find a sliver of space and got a chance on net, the Blues brilliant rookie tender, Jordan Binnington, made saves that disguised and defied his rookie status. The healthier, better executing team won. I don’t think there is any shame in that if your team gave every ounce of energy in opposition. You can be confident the Sharks “maxed out.” They competed hard but didn’t have enough. It’s a hard pill to swallow. One of the great American writers and orators from the 1800’s, Robert Ingersoll, wrote:“The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing heart.” The Sharks didn’t lose heart. They displayed courage and took their defeat as they have won and lost all year — as a team. But this will not be the team when the Sharks return to the ice next September. With the end of the playoffs comes the very tough offseason where it’s very likely that some of your favorite Sharks will become your favorite former Sharks. GM Doug Wilson has some very busy days and sleepless nights ahead.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] According to CapFriendly, the Sharks have 15 players signed for a total of  $58,296,667. That leaves $24,703,333, based on the salary cap going up to $83 million. The good news is that Doug has done a good job locking up key players to contracts with good term and respectable salaries relative to the rest of the league. Brent Burns, Logan Couture, Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Martin Jones and Evander Kane are locked up. Doug will need to address his restricted free agents. Timo Meier — 30 goals at 22 years old — has without a doubt earned himself a big raise. He’s probably looking at something north of $6 million per year and a term of 4 or 5 years. Kevin LaBanc, Joakim Ryan and Dylan Gambrell will shrink the cap space by an estimated $12-13 million. Then there are the unrestricted free agents, those who can leave: The big three, Erik Karlsson and two of the greatest Sharks of all time, Joe Pavelski and Jumbo Joe Thornton. Add Gus Nyquist, Joonas Donskoi and Micheal Hayley… the numbers simply cannot be crunched enough. That is the biggest heartbreak of all.
24 May 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Even though I haven’t coached this century, except for coaching my boys to a bronze medal at 2014 Western Canadian U18 Ball Hockey Championships, I still have some coaching habits. I always like to watch a game a second time the next day. When Todd McLellan coached the Sharks, he allowed me to join him the next morning to watch the game with the coaches. I loved that; I didn’t love waking up at 5:30 to do it though. Even to this day as a broadcaster, I will re-watch the game I called the night before — with the sound muted, of course. It’s a great exercise. It allows a clearer, more detached, more impartial view of the game. Watching a game live, the emotion and drama in the heat of the moment can cloud anybody’s analytical skills. So after watching the Sharks again bow out of the 2019 playoffs I can affirm Peter DeBoer’s remarks after Game 6 in St. Louis. The 5-1 score was not reflective of the effort the Sharks dispensed. They did make the Blues “earn it.” Effort, work, heart. Use whatever word you want. The Sharks displayed a ton of it. Not just in the final game, missing three of their top performers, but throughout the entire playoff run. I know that does not ease the disappointment of seeing your team bow out so frustratingly close to another Stanley Cup Final. The look on Joe Thornton’s face said it all, a heartbreaking contemplation of coming so close while still being so far away It is simple to break down the St. Louis series. The punishment the Blues dished out game after game worked to perfection. Exhibit A: No Pavelski, No Hertl, No Karlsson for part of Game 5 and all of Game 6. The Sharks offense was stymied by an imposing defenseive core and dedicated backtracking forwards. Do you remember any odd man attacks the Sharks were able to generate? Yeah, neither do I. Time and space were luxuries the Sharks did not have. When they did find a sliver of space and got a chance on net, the Blues brilliant rookie tender, Jordan Binnington, made saves that disguised and defied his rookie status. The healthier, better executing team won. I don’t think there is any shame in that if your team gave every ounce of energy in opposition. You can be confident the Sharks “maxed out.” They competed hard but didn’t have enough. It’s a hard pill to swallow. One of the great American writers and orators from the 1800’s, Robert Ingersoll, wrote:“The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing heart.” The Sharks didn’t lose heart. They displayed courage and took their defeat as they have won and lost all year — as a team. But this will not be the team when the Sharks return to the ice next September. With the end of the playoffs comes the very tough offseason where it’s very likely that some of your favorite Sharks will become your favorite former Sharks. GM Doug Wilson has some very busy days and sleepless nights ahead.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] According to CapFriendly, the Sharks have 15 players signed for a total of  $58,296,667. That leaves $24,703,333, based on the salary cap going up to $83 million. The good news is that Doug has done a good job locking up key players to contracts with good term and respectable salaries relative to the rest of the league. Brent Burns, Logan Couture, Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Martin Jones and Evander Kane are locked up. Doug will need to address his restricted free agents. Timo Meier — 30 goals at 22 years old — has without a doubt earned himself a big raise. He’s probably looking at something north of $6 million per year and a term of 4 or 5 years. Kevin LaBanc, Joakim Ryan and Dylan Gambrell will shrink the cap space by an estimated $12-13 million. Then there are the unrestricted free agents, those who can leave: The big three, Erik Karlsson and two of the greatest Sharks of all time, Joe Pavelski and Jumbo Joe Thornton. Add Gus Nyquist, Joonas Donskoi and Micheal Hayley… the numbers simply cannot be crunched enough. That is the biggest heartbreak of all.
24 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
Even though I haven’t coached this century, except for coaching my boys to a bronze medal at 2014 Western Canadian U18 Ball Hockey Championships, I still have some coaching habits. I always like to watch a game a second time the next day. When Todd McLellan coached the Sharks, he allowed me to join him the next morning to watch the game with the coaches. I loved that; I didn’t love waking up at 5:30 to do it though. Even to this day as a broadcaster, I will re-watch the game I called the night before — with the sound muted, of course. It’s a great exercise. It allows a clearer, more detached, more impartial view of the game. Watching a game live, the emotion and drama in the heat of the moment can cloud anybody’s analytical skills. So after watching the Sharks again bow out of the 2019 playoffs I can affirm Peter DeBoer’s remarks after Game 6 in St. Louis. The 5-1 score was not reflective of the effort the Sharks dispensed. They did make the Blues “earn it.” Effort, work, heart. Use whatever word you want. The Sharks displayed a ton of it. Not just in the final game, missing three of their top performers, but throughout the entire playoff run. I know that does not ease the disappointment of seeing your team bow out so frustratingly close to another Stanley Cup Final. The look on Joe Thornton’s face said it all, a heartbreaking contemplation of coming so close while still being so far away It is simple to break down the St. Louis series. The punishment the Blues dished out game after game worked to perfection. Exhibit A: No Pavelski, No Hertl, No Karlsson for part of Game 5 and all of Game 6. The Sharks offense was stymied by an imposing defenseive core and dedicated backtracking forwards. Do you remember any odd man attacks the Sharks were able to generate? Yeah, neither do I. Time and space were luxuries the Sharks did not have. When they did find a sliver of space and got a chance on net, the Blues brilliant rookie tender, Jordan Binnington, made saves that disguised and defied his rookie status. The healthier, better executing team won. I don’t think there is any shame in that if your team gave every ounce of energy in opposition. You can be confident the Sharks “maxed out.” They competed hard but didn’t have enough. It’s a hard pill to swallow. One of the great American writers and orators from the 1800’s, Robert Ingersoll, wrote:“The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing heart.” The Sharks didn’t lose heart. They displayed courage and took their defeat as they have won and lost all year — as a team. But this will not be the team when the Sharks return to the ice next September. With the end of the playoffs comes the very tough offseason where it’s very likely that some of your favorite Sharks will become your favorite former Sharks. GM Doug Wilson has some very busy days and sleepless nights ahead.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] According to CapFriendly, the Sharks have 15 players signed for a total of  $58,296,667. That leaves $24,703,333, based on the salary cap going up to $83 million. The good news is that Doug has done a good job locking up key players to contracts with good term and respectable salaries relative to the rest of the league. Brent Burns, Logan Couture, Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Martin Jones and Evander Kane are locked up. Doug will need to address his restricted free agents. Timo Meier — 30 goals at 22 years old — has without a doubt earned himself a big raise. He’s probably looking at something north of $6 million per year and a term of 4 or 5 years. Kevin LaBanc, Joakim Ryan and Dylan Gambrell will shrink the cap space by an estimated $12-13 million. Then there are the unrestricted free agents, those who can leave: The big three, Erik Karlsson and two of the greatest Sharks of all time, Joe Pavelski and Jumbo Joe Thornton. Add Gus Nyquist, Joonas Donskoi and Micheal Hayley… the numbers simply cannot be crunched enough. That is the biggest heartbreak of all.