Fbi

22 Apr 19
Rebeka's blog

I feel like the subject of my art hardly changed at all throughout the years. I still do love fantasy after all. But as I matured darker things began to take the place of brightly colored fantasy lands. It’s not that I’ve become more pessimistic, I’ve just become more inspired to draw messed up landscapes, […]

22 Apr 19
IPO EMPIRE

Leader of armed group stopping migrants at U.S.-Mexico border to face federal charges  Reuters Leader of right-wing militia arrested by FBI ‘for detaining migrant families at gunpoint in New Mexico’  The Independent An armed militia was ‘detaining’ migrants at the border. The FBI arrested its leader.  The Washington Post FBI arrests leader of armed militia that detained migrants […]

22 Apr 19
BREAKERMAG
Utah’s governor has signed a bill, HB57, requiring police to get search warrants before accessing data held by third parties, including social media networks and cloud computing services. Though the bill was signed into law on March 28, it hasn’t attracted much attention nationally. But its implications are huge: The law is an effort to correct what some see as a fundamental flaw in the enforcement of the U.S. Bill of Rights. The problems with existing legal precedent, and the new law’s potential impact, are nicely laid out by Nick Sibilla of the Institute for Justice, a libertarian public-interest law firm. A precedent known as the “third-party doctrine” has, since the 1970s, allowed law enforcement to access personal data including bank and phone records without a warrant. The Supreme Court’s logic in establishing the doctrine was that individuals had forfeited their expectation of privacy by giving information about their behavior to third parties. Get the BREAKERMAG newsletter, a twice-weekly roundup of blockchain business and culture. From where we stand today, that sounds patently insane—we entrust massive amounts of very personal data to third parties, down to the granular data about online behavior handled by our internet service providers. To a large degree, this means that the Fourth Amendment, which protects against “unreasonable search and seizure” when it comes to things like your house, car, or pockets, simply doesn’t apply to data compiled about you by digital services. As Jay-Z once put it: “My glove compartment is locked, and so’s the trunk in the back. I know my rights, so you gon’ need a warrant for that.” The same principle does apply to local digital devices—police need a warrant to open your phone storage without your consent, for instance. But for data stored by third parties, things are pretty close to a free-for-all. Related: People Don’t Care About Financial Privacy As Much As You Think Invasive digital surveillance has been normalized in part thanks to enduring post-9/11 fears about terrorism. But it has become increasingly clear that mass data collection by bodies including the National Security Agency provides little or no advantage over traditional, warrant-authorized investigative techniques. In 2012, for instance, a Senate investigation found that Department of Homeland Security “fusion centers,” which collate data including information obtained from warrantless digital surveillance, had “not yielded significant useful information to support federal counterterrorism intelligence efforts.” What such techniques did accomplish, according to Senator Tom Coburn in the same report, was “wast[ing] money and stepp[ing] on American’s civil liberties.” Such findings don’t seem to have much impact on the government’s ghoulish hunger for more ways to surveil people. The CLOUD Act, passed last year, even allows foreign governments to access user data held by U.S. technology companies, without going through U.S. courts—and gives special privileges to the U.S. in requests for foreign data. There is a growing awareness, however, that the third-party doctrine that allows this sort of behavior is flawed, especially when applied to contemporary technology. In June of 2018, the Supreme Court ruled that detailed cell-phone location data could not be freely accessed by law enforcement under the third-party doctrine, because that would essentially open the door to full-time, warrantless monitoring of people’s movements. The opinion also inevitably raised broader questions about the third-party doctrine in an era when we all depend on remote digital services to go about our daily lives. Utah’s new law is another meaningful step towards redressing the encroachment of state power into the digital realm. There is a major caveat: the restrictions only apply to Utah’s own state-level law enforcement agencies, according to lawyer Peter Jaffe. That means the Provo Sheriff’s office or Salt Lake PD can’t peek at your Twitter DMs without a warrant, but your friends at the FBI still can.
22 Apr 19
Headlines With A Voice

  Congressman Louie Gohmert said Robert Mueller “is not a good man,” and as FBI director purged experienced and competent agents in pursuit of “yes-men.” In an interview last Friday, Congressman Gohmert reflected on Mueller’s tenure as FBI director.

22 Apr 19
Brittanii Lyons Journalism

https://today.wayne.edu/news/2019/03/08/snapshot-of-the-city-university-archives-tell-detroits-story-23673 As media the world over sought reflections last year on the life and death of legendary singer Aretha Franklin, few probably realized how often it was archivists at Wayne State University who provided the looking glass. Media requests from throughout the world are common, explained Alison Stankrauff, a university archivist who helps oversee and […]

22 Apr 19
HaroldDetective

School threat update: Metro schools were recommended to have a controlled release, which means increasing safety protocols as they let kids go home. FBI & CDPS will be sending clarification to schools. Schools will follow their local safety plans. School threat update: Metro schools were recommended to have a controlled release, which means increasing safety […]

22 Apr 19
HaroldDetective

Out of an abundance of caution, the @coemergency Colorado Information Analysis Center (CIAC) today issued an alert to Denver-metro schools about a credible threat being investigated by the @FBIDenver . Please follow your local school, the FBI, and @jeffcosheriffco for more info. Out of an abundance of caution, the @coemergency Colorado Information Analysis Center (CIAC) […]

22 Apr 19
Russia News Now

Immigration What Happens If Trump Breaks All the Laws? Human Rights Zionism Violates the Principles at the Heart of Judaism Economy & Labor Pete Buttigieg Trivializes the Impact of Trade on US Job Losses Politics & Elections Mueller Report Exposes Campaign Finance Problems Far Beyond Russia War & Peace Pushing New Oil Sanctions, Mike Pompeo […]

22 Apr 19
HaroldDetective

Please call the FBI tipline at (303) 630-6227 where your call will be answered immediately if you have seen this individual or have information on her whereabouts. Please do not approach her as she is considered armed and dangerous 3/3 pic.twitter.com/sybtMRzG80 Please call the FBI tipline at (303) 630-6227 where your call will be answered […]

22 Apr 19
Traversing Tradition

This piece is the final part of a three part policy report on the secularization of the Muslim mind. You can read part one here and part two here. The battle for the hearts and minds of Muslims comes while the Muslim world stands at a crossroad between liberation from authoritarian regimes and a continuation of […]

22 Apr 19
A Unique Title For Me

Hauptmann the accused kidnapper of America’s greatest hero aviator Charles Lindbergh’s baby was to have his day in court. Lindbergh became the first worldwide celebrity five years earlier when he flew The Spirit of St. Louis across the Atlantic. Public interest was at a peak, as this was the most interesting case since Scopes monkey […]

22 Apr 19
Welkian Filmology: A Blog by T. A. Newman

Late October, 1938 — dark clouds of war in Europe; nearly a decade of national poverty. You turn the dial on your radio, and you pick up an emergency broadcast. Something about an attack! An invasion!? The town is in a confused panic. On the radio, a reporter is choking on the air. You get […]

22 Apr 19
NATION AND STATE

President Donald Trump suggested on April 22 that former Secretary of State John Kerry may have violated the Logan Act by advising Iran. “Iran is being given VERY BAD advice by John Kerry and people who helped him lead the U.S. into the very bad Iran Nuclear Deal. Big violation of Logan Act?” Trump wrote […]

22 Apr 19
NATION AND STATE

President Donald Trump suggested on April 22 that former Secretary of State John Kerry may have violated the Logan Act by advising Iran. “Iran is being given VERY BAD advice by John Kerry and people who helped him lead the U.S. into the very bad Iran Nuclear Deal. Big violation of Logan Act?” Trump wrote […]