Fein

19 Apr 19
FOX 61

LONDONDERRY, No. Ireland — A prominent young journalist was killed during a night of rioting in Londonderry on Thursday, in what police in Northern Ireland have described as a “terrorist incident.” Dissident republicans are believed to be responsible for the death of Lyra McKee, 29, who was shot during violent unrest in the Creggan area […]

19 Apr 19
News Archives Uk

Northern Ireland police have released video footage of moments before the death of journalist Lyra McKee. Ms. McKee, 29, was shot in the head when she covered up in Londonderry on Thursday night and later died in the hospital. The police have now released CCTV footage showing the street at the time of their murder, […]

19 Apr 19
The Irish Sun
POLICE investigating the terrorist murder of Lyra McKee have released footage of the young journalist and the gunman believed to be her killer. The 29-year-old was shot dead in the Creggan area of Derry on Thursday following a night of riots and unrest in the city. Tragic journalist Lyra McKee CCTV footage shows Lyra moments before her murder Footage of Lyra’s alleged murderer The PSNI have opened a murder investigation following the death of the freelance journalist who was covering the violence before she was tragically killed. And tonight, detectives released CCTV footage from the estate on Thursday night. The footage shows Ms McKee at the back of a large crowd of innocent onlookers shortly before she was murdered. It then shows the alleged gunman at a corner. Another masked individual is then seen picking something up from the ground where the suspected shooter stood. ‘COME FORWARD’ The PSNI said they were releasing the footage to encourage people to come forward with information. In a statement on social media, the PSNI said: “Can you assist our investigation into the murder of Lyra McKee? “Detective Superintendent Jason Murphy, the senior detective leading the investigation into the murder, has released cctv footage to encourage anyone with information to share it with us.” Appealing for witnesses to submit videos and photos taken on the night, Det Supt Murphy said: “Lyra’s death is senseless and appalling beyond belief. It represents the tragic loss of promise and the loss of potential, however it should not be the loss of hope. “We have already received a large number of calls and information from the public and I would like to thank them for their support and for their willingness to come forward and to try to help us take a killer off the streets. We also know that a range of footage is circulating on social media however I cannot stress enough how important it is that people who were in the area last night and who recorded video and took photos share what they have with us via our Major Incident Public Portal. “People saw the gunman and people saw those who goaded young people out onto the streets, people know who they are. The answers to what happened last night lie within the community. I am asking people to do the right thing for Lyra McKee, for her family and for the city of Derry/Londonderry and help us stop this madness. “Please, submit your footage and images to the dedicated Major Incident Public Portal via https://mipp.police.uk/operation/PSNI19O09-PO1 or pick up the phone and call us on 101. Make a difference.” This afternoon, hundreds of people have gathered in the Creggan area of Derry for a vigil. Her devastated partner Sara Canning said: “Our hopes and dreams, and all of her amazing potential, was snuffed out by a single barbaric act.” A number of political leaders are attending the gathering, including DUP leader Arlene Foster, Sinn Fein’s leader in the North Michelle O’Neill and Sinn Fein president and Dublin TD Mary Lou McDonald. Sara told the crowds: “The senseless murder of Lyra McKee has left a family without a beloved daughter, a sister, an aunt and a great aunt. “It’s left so many friends without their confidante, victims in the LGBTQIA society and community left without a tireless advocate and activist. “It’s left me without the love of my life, the woman I was planning to grow old with. “We are all poorer for the loss of Lyra. “Our hopes and dreams, and all of her amazing potential, was snuffed out by a single barbaric act. “This cannot stand. Lyra’s death must not be in vain because her life was a shining light in everyone else’s life. “And her legacy will live on in the light that she’s left behind.” [bc_video video_id=”6027968084001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Police pay tribute to Lyra McKee and urge public to help end ‘New IRA’ by talking to loved ones”] ‘SHE CHANGED OUR LIVES’ Earlier this afternoon, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar branded the killing of Lyra an act of fear, hate and cowardice. Extending his condolences to Lyra’s partner Sarah, family and friends, he said: “An activist and a journalist, she changed our lives as she lived and will do so again in death.” Mr Varadkar said 21 years ago, when the Good Friday Agreement was signed, the people of Ireland chose peace, democracy and power sharing. He added: “We will not be dragged into the past. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”2″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] “There is no place nor any justification for political violence in Ireland, or Northern Ireland today. “This was an act of fear, this was an act of hate and this was an act of cowardice. “Those who carried it out do not share the views of our nation nor our Republic and we reject them.” Lyra was just 29 Lyra’s partner Sarah Canning at a vigil today Sinn Fein leader Mary Lou McDonald at the vigil at the scene in Creggan [bc_video video_id=”6027916817001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Journalist Lyra McKee delivers TED Talk fighting for change in religious teaching on LGBT people”]
19 Apr 19
Lowmiller Consulting Group Blog

Lyra McKee Northern Ireland’s six main parties say they reject those responsible for journalist’s death The Sinn Féin leader, Mary Lou McDonald, left, with the DUP leader, Arlene Foster, at a vigil in Derry. Photograph: Brian Lawless/PA A police hunt is under way in Derry for the dissident republican gunman who killed journalist Lyra McKee […]

19 Apr 19
miracledesignblog

Easter – a time to enjoy nature’s yearly revival – new leaves adorn trees, flowers dazzle us with their colors, birds are singing their melodies… Time to read poems, too. In four languages (Spanish, French, English, Italian) the Anthology of Love by Jorge Centofanti is a special gift for that special friend – but, of […]

19 Apr 19
The Sun
TWENTY years ago a historic peace agreement signalled the end of three decades of sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland. But what were the Troubles and what is the Good Friday agreement? Here’s the lowdown on the years of bloody violence. A British soldier dragging a protester during a march later known as ‘Bloody Sunday’, in Londonderry, Northern Ireland When were The Troubles? The Troubles describe a 30-year period between the late 60s and early 90s, when sectarian violence in Northern Ireland caused the deaths of thousands of civilians and security personnel. Historians tend to place the beginning of the Troubles with the 1968 civil rights movement, which demanded an end to Unionist-dominated rule from the devolved Northern Ireland government at Stormont. Marches, protests, civil disobedience and increasing violence led to the British government’s decision in 1969 to deploy troops to the streets, especially in Belfast and Londonderry. In 1971, the government introduced its policy of internment, locking up terror suspects without trial. By the following year, the situation had deteriorated. On Bloody Sunday, 13 unarmed people were shot and killed by the British Army during a civil rights march in Londonderry. The British government then suspended Stormont’s rule and imposed direct rule from London. The Provisional IRA, an offshoot that would eventually overtake the Official IRA, saw a surge in membership and its bombing and assassination campaign against security forces and Protestants picked up. Meanwhile, pro-British paramilitary groups like the UDA (Ulster Defence Association) and UVF (Ulster Volunteer Force) committed to violence against Catholics and the IRA to prevent a united Ireland. Bombings and shootings continued uninterrupted for the next thirty years, with multiple massacres leaving scores dead. The worst atrocity was the IRA’s Omagh Bombing in 1998, which left 29 innocent people dead including six teenagers, six children and a woman pregnant with twins. In all, it is estimated that between 3,500 and 4,000 people died as a direct result of Troubles violence. At least 50,000 were maimed or badly injured. In a country that at that time had barely over a million people, this level of violence was crippling. The iconic image of the then Father Daly waving a handkerchief over one of the Bloody Sunday victims became one of the most enduring images of the Troubles What is the Good Friday agreement? The Troubles came to an end in 1998 with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement, also known as the Belfast Agreement. This historic treaty on April 10 put in place a cross-community power-sharing government in Stormont and a disarmament programme. Covering two different documents – a multi-party agreement and a British-Irish agreement – the agreement was backed by voters in a referendum in May 1998. Direct London rule came to an end when the British-Irish Agreement came into force on December 2, 1999. The multi-party agreement committed Sinn Féin and the Progressive Unionist Party to “use any influence they have” to bring about the decommissioning of all paramilitary arms within two years of the referendums approving the agreement. Two residents walk past Free Derry Corner in the Catholic Bogside area of Derry on March 15, 2010, in Northern Ireland Has the treaty worked? The peace process has not been all plain sailing. The new executive model in Stormont proved problematic, and distrust between the parties led to the assembly being suspended several times. From 2002 until 8 May 2007, when the St Andrews Agreement was signed, Northern Ireland was once again directly ruled from Westminster. Before stepping down Tony Blair managed to win over Ian Paisley, despite previously saying the idea of the DUP man agreeing to a deal was “pie in the sky”. The new accord made ministers more accountable to the executive and the assembly, while the first minister and deputy first minister would now be nominated by their parties rather than elected. Conflict arose again in 2017, with the DUP and Sinn Fein unable to come to an agreement on power-sharing. Without a devolved executive, the British government moved to impose a budget directly on Northern Ireland. Brexit has also raised questions about peace in Northern Ireland. There have been fierce debates over the prospect of a post-Brexit “hard border“, which could ignite sectarian tensions if imposed. Sinn Fein and the unionists are touting a united Ireland as an alternative means to remain in the EU, something the DUP vehemently opposes. George Mitchell, who as US Special Envoy for Northern Ireland chaired the talks that led to the historic agreement 20 years ago, has warned that a perfect storm of direct rule and a hard border could lead to “serious trouble” and a return to the violence of the 1970s and 1980s. Mourners file past the coffin of Father Hugh Mullan, the first victim of the Ballymurphy Massacre by British troops in 1971 What was Belfast’s Bloody Sunday? The Ballymurphy Massacre was a series of events that took place between August 9 and 11, 1971. It saw British soldiers from the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment kill eleven civilians in Ballymurphy in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The killings became known as Belfast’s “Bloody Sunday”. On August 9, more than 600 British soldiers from the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment entered the area and began raiding homes and rounding up men of all ages without reason. The raids came as part of Operation Demetrius and were designed to arrest and intern anyone suspected of being a member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA). Soldiers carried out early morning raids at around 5am, kicking down doors and dragging unsuspecting civilians from their beds. Members of the 1st Battalion Parachute Regiment claim that as they entered the Ballymurphy area, they were shot at by republicans and were forced to return fire. However, there is no photographic or video evidence, or accounts from journalists that could prove exactly what happened. Statements provided by the troops claiming they fired in retaliation have always been angrily rejected by the victims’ families who maintain that the killings were unprovoked. A new inquest is due to open in September 2018, in the hope of establishing precisely what happened. Ahead of this, a Channel 4 documentary, Massacre at Ballymurphy, aired on Saturday, September 8, 2018, at 9pm, revisiting the fatal gun battle that saw eleven citizens fatally shot.   Timeline – how the Troubles unfolded August 1969: The British government deploys troops in Northern Ireland in a “limited operation” to restore law and order, following three days of violence in the Catholic Bogside area of Londonderry February 1971: Gunner Robert Curtis becomes the first British soldier to die when he is shot dead by the IRA January 30, 1972: On Bloody Sunday, the British Army shot and killed thirteen unarmed people during a civil rights march in Londonderry March 1972: The Stormont Government is dissolved and direct rule imposed by Westminster October 1974: Pubs are bombed in Guildford as the IRA expands its campaign to mainland Britain. A month later, there are more pub bombings in Birmingham, killing 21 people July 1976: British Ambassador to Ireland Christopher Ewart Biggs is murdered by a car bomb in Dublin October 1984: A bomb explodes at the Grand Hotel in Brighton, where Margaret Thatcher PM was staying during the Conservative Party conference November 1985: Margaret Thatcher and Garret FitzGerald, the Irish Taoiseach, sign the Anglo-Irish Agreement, paving the way for co-operation between the two governments. November 1987: 11 civilians are killed by a Provisional IRA bomb at a Remembrance Day service in Enniskillen April 1998: The Good Friday Agreement is signed, hailing the end of the Troubles Will Brexit affect the Good Friday Agreement? There are fears Britain leaving the EU could “re-ignite” the conflict in Northern Ireland. Experts have claimed north-south relations, the peace process, border controls, racism and socio-economic rights will all be negatively affected by Brexit. But former first minister David Trimble said there was no serious threat of post-Brexit violence in Northern Ireland. Although he said the agreement would be breached if Northern Ireland was part of a different trade regime than the rest of the UK. DUP leader Arlene Foster also spoke out in October 2018 – saying the Good Friday Agreement is not “sacrosanct” and the landmark peace treaty could be altered to accommodate a Brexit deal. She said the agreement could “evolve” in the EU context. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON BREXIT” term_id=”447″ posts_number=”6″ /]   The UK and the EU both want to avoid a “hard border” with Michel Barnier saying on September 18, 2018, the EU is “ready to improve” its offer on the Irish border. A hard border would mean border checks being reintroduced on the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. Currently the border is open with no checks on goods or people, with Ireland and the UK in a “common travel area” of passport-free movement. There are fears a hard border could jeopardise the Good Friday Agreement peace deal, which removed security checkpoints from the border. [bc_video video_id=”5835859846001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Boris Johnson says a technical fix in the Irish border could allow a Brexit negotiation breakthrough”]
19 Apr 19
The Frontier Post

LONDON (AFP): A woman has been shot dead during riots in the city of Londonderry in Northern Ireland and the killing is being treated as a terrorist incident, police said Friday, following the latest upsurge in violence to shake the troubled region. Although the woman had yet to be formally identified, several reporters named her […]

19 Apr 19
Trendy Craze

Several vigils were held across Ireland for Lyra McKee on Friday, April 19, one day after the 29-year-old journalist was killed in what the PSNI described as a “terrorist act” during riots in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland. Speaking at a vigil held at the scene of the shooting in Creggan , Sinn […]

19 Apr 19
The Australian

Several vigils were held across Ireland for Lyra McKee on Friday, April 19, one day after the 29-year-old journalist was killed in what the PSNI described as a “terrorist act” during riots in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland. Speaking at a vigil held at the scene of the shooting in Creggan , Sinn Féin leader Mary Lou McDonald said people should respond to the shooting by dedicating themselves to peace. She branded the shooting as a “gross act of violence against the people of Derry and the people of Ireland.” McDonald said she was carrying a rainbow flag in tribute to McKee, who was an LGBT activist, as well as for McKee’s partner and her family. McKee, who was gay, delivered a TED talk at Stormont in Belfast in November 2017 in which she argued that changes in religious teaching were necessary for the development of LGBT rights. At the time of her death, she was working on a book about children and young men who disappeared during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. The book was due to be published by Faber & Faber, who reportedly described McKee as a “rising star on investigative journalism” and said she had a “knack of engaging the head and the heart.” DUP leader Arlene Foster, visiting the Republican stronghold of Creggan for the first time, told the crowd at the vigil: “Your pain is my pain. It doesn’t matter whether you are a Catholic or Protestant. Whether you identify as Irish or British.” McKee’s partner Sara Canning also addressed the crowd, describing McKee’s killing as a “barbaric act.” Vigils were also due to be held on Friday in Dublin and Belfast. Credit: @GMLmusic via Storyful