First Impressions

25 Jun 19
Film Follower's Reviews

Anna’s great John Wick style action sequences and lead actress Sasha Luss save the movie from being just another Russian spy story.

25 Jun 19
Library of Markum

Book review of Alanna The First Adventure by Tamora Pierce, one of the best fantasy books for girls.

25 Jun 19
Joseph Soares

Open Data -at its most basic concept- is the sharing of information freely. Open Government Platforms — also referred to as OGPs — have the potential to improve transparency in government agencies, inspire citizen engagement, improve economic growth, and even bolster accountability across many spectrums of service. There are primary and secondary impacts that Open […]

25 Jun 19
Beauty, Hair, Nail & Skin Tutorials

[ad_1] HEY EVERYONE… Today we are discussing the controversial Tarte Cosmetics Shape Tape Foundation. When they showed the shade range for this product, the whole internet was shocked! How could I brand think it’s ok to exclude people of color?? I discuss my thoughts on this and then do a demo/first impressions on the product. […]

25 Jun 19
San on the Lam

Tuesday 08 October 2002-Thursday 10 October 2002. Egypt. A fun part of our first visit to Egypt, back in 2002, was a four night cruise down the Nile on one of those posh cruiseboats. In fact, it was only a two day cruise, with one night spent at Aswan and two nights at Luxor, with […]

25 Jun 19
Truth2Freedom's Blog

Sin Brings God’s Judgment For it is on account of these things that the wrath of God will come, (3:6) God’s wrath is “His eternal detestation of all unrighteousness. It is the displeasure and indignation of Divine equity against evil. It is the holiness of God stirred into activity against sin” (Arthur W. Pink, The […]

25 Jun 19
RESPOND

“There is no truth,” he barked authoritatively. “That’s interesting,” I replied. “It sounds to me like you are making a claim here that you think is true.” “What do you mean?” I shifted in my seat. “Well, you just said it is true to say…that there is no truth. Right? Sounds like you are making […]

25 Jun 19
CauseACTION Clarion

Thomas Jefferson wrote to Mr. Hammond in 1821: “The germ of dissolution of our federal government is in … the federal judiciary; an irresponsible body … working like gravity by night and by day, gaining a little today and a little tomorrow, and advancing its noiseless step like a thief, over the field of jurisdiction, […]

25 Jun 19
NW-SCC Online Educator Development

I plan to improve the active online engagement by implementing more introductory information: welcome to class, bio information with photo, as well as weekly virtual office hours. I want the students to feel successful right at the beginning of class, so improving my introductory/welcome information should improve my first impression with them. Also, while I […]

25 Jun 19
Writers Welcome Committee

A Greek philosopher Heraclitus once said, ” a man never steps in the same river twice, for it is not the same river and he’s not the same man.” At first glance, we can read this quote assuming that rivers can be stepped into twice and be the same individual as they were yesterday. My […]

25 Jun 19
Daily Bulletin
For those interested in Southern California history, reading autobiographies is a wonderful way to experience “vicariously” what those times were like. But be aware that the authors are documenting “how they remember certain events,” and in some cases, “how they would like” to remember those events. One of those authors — whose personal reflections are insightful, but should be taken with a grain of salt (or two) — is Major Horace Bell. Born in Indiana on Dec. 11, 1830, Bell was a Los Angeles Ranger, filibuster, soldier, lawyer, journalist and newspaper publisher. He was also author of two books about his life and the early years of the State of California, which included San Bernardino County. The first was an 1881 memoir, “Reminiscences of a Ranger: Early Times in Southern California.”  More of his memoirs were included in a posthumously published “On the Old West Coast: Being Further Reminiscences of a Ranger” in 1930. While he refers to himself as a “truthful historian,” Bell enjoyed telling rollicking, action-packed, character-based tales that sometimes exaggerated facts. While in Los Angeles in 1852, visiting his “Uncle Alexander,” he acknowledged his impression of the city. “Los Angeles, at the time of my arrival, was certainly a nice looking place — the houses generally looked neat and clean, and were well whitewashed. “The business of the place was very considerable; most of the merchants were all getting rich. The streets were thronged throughout the entire day with splendidly mounted and richly dressed caballeros, most of whom wore suits of clothes that cost all the way from $500 to $1,000, with, saddle and horse trappings that cost even more than the above named sums.” His tour on his second day in town, of course, included the more colorful establishments in town, including the many grog shops, gambling dens and other places of entertainment. Bell claimed that in 1853, the year “showed an average mortality from fights and assassinations of over one per day in Los Angeles.” He went on to say that “police statistics showed a greater number of murders in California than in all the United States besides, and a greater number in Los Angeles than in all of the rest of California” for the same year. While his facts may not have been accurate, there is no question that crime and violence was high in Los Angeles during that time. Over the next few years, the multi-talented Horace Bell acquired wealth as a trader, became influential in politics and became a founding member of the “Los Angeles Rangers,” a militia company that pursued outlaws in what was at the time the most violent, lawless county in Southern California. A Mormon posse answered a plea in 1853 to rescue travelers in the Temecula area supposedly threatened by the notorious Joaquin Murrieta. In this incident, San Bernardino County Sheriff Robert Cliff, met up with Bell who recalled the Mormon posse was “the best fellows I ever had anything to do with.” During the 1850s, the author/adventurer visited the twin settlements of La Placita and Agua Mansa (located on opposite sides of the Santa Ana River between Riverside and Colton) on many occasions and described his impression as follows: “About half way from Jurupa, which was then a military post, and San Bernardino was situated the most beautiful settlement I ever saw. It was called Agua Mansa, meaning ‘Gentle Water,’ and was composed of immigrants from New Mexico, numbering 200 souls — simple, good souls they were, too, primitive in their style of living, kind and hospitable to strangers, rich in all that went to make people happy and content … With peace and plenty surrounding them, the good people of Agua Mansa went to make as contented and happy a people as could be found in the universe.” During the mid to late 1880s, Southern California went through a population boom thanks to rail travel, assisted by promoters who would say or do almost anything to get newcomers settling in. Perhaps the most poignant example of how some opportunists would use every scheme possible to snare gullible land seekers to part with their cash was mentioned by Major Bell in his book, “On The Old West Coast.” Having had just visited Hesperia, he critiqued the boomers, as a “speculative conspiracy against all that was honest.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Bell wrote in part: “I was publishing a weekly paper then and did all that was possible to save people from ruin.” “Widneyville-by-the-Desert (his tongue and cheek jab at Robert Widney) was a prize exhibit of those days. A tremendous excursion was organized to conduct the speculative hordes to the site of the proposed ideal city on the opening day. … a rather appalling growth of cactus and yucca palms, commonly called Joshua trees, covered the desert hereabouts,” he wrote. “These spiny, writhing Joshua trees are really a horrific sight if you are not used to them, but the promoters of Widneyville had a bright idea that saved them the expense of clearing the growth off. They did a little judicious trimming on the cactus plants and yuccas, shaping them up into certain uniformity, then shipped out a carload of cheap windfall oranges and on the end of each bayonet-like spike on the yuccas and on each cactus spine they impaled an orange. “Suddenly the desert fruited like the orange grove,” he wrote. Obviously, those who bothered to take a closer look were not fooled. However, according to the author, some who most likely had never actually seen an orange tree or a Joshua tree, plinked money down on the spot for the nearby desert land they believed to be a waiting paradise. There was no one quite like Major Horace Bell, who died at his home in Berkeley of injuries received from a fall on June 29, 1918. He was 88. Contact Nick Cataldo at Yankeenut15@gmail.com and read more of his local history articles at Facebook.com/BackRoadsPress.
25 Jun 19
Arcynewsy

The starting shot for “Bauer sucht Frau International”, the spin-off of the RTL success format “Bauer sucht Frau”, has fallen. In the first episode, the first four of the eight German-speaking single farmers meet after a short introductory round of all farmers on their three chosen court ladies. And with one or the other pair […]

25 Jun 19
Ritucharya

A mindful sleep is the seed of a mindful morning!

25 Jun 19
News Directory

TUATIN – When the Portland Trail Blazers held their initial news conference for their draft Nassir Little Monday morning, general manager Blazers greeted the media with two special guests. "I just want to welcome Nassir's mother, April, and his sister, Kamaria," Olshey said. "We were lucky they were with us." With his present family present, […]

25 Jun 19
Hoang Lan Dang

Chapter nineteen That startling month in which I first came upon the Chairman again-and met Nobu, and Dr. Crab, and Uchida Kosaburo-made me feel something like a pet cricket that has at last escaped its wicker cage. For the first time in ages I could go to bed at night believing I might not always […]