Flooding

21 Jul 19
Logospilgrim

Things are pretty damn good. First, my 50th birthday was splendid. Presents, buttercream laden cake, quiet activities that gave my introvert self the greatest pleasure. I took many portraits to commemorate this event. I had fun with wigs, undergarments, Mozartian and Snapian themes. And now I’m going to share a bunch of them. I am […]

21 Jul 19
Brian's blog

Getting through a storm: I’ve lived in Florida most of my life and I’ve witnessed every storm known to man. Hurricanes, tornadoes, hail storms, flooding, etc. Even in my day storms could be predicted and prepared for a head of time. So how do you prepare for a: Category five addiction problem? Category five financial […]

21 Jul 19
The Cancer Gap

Running I tried to outrun you. And failed. I ran to get to the other side,To be cured and have you in my past,It’s not that easy; my time I must now bide. Now I run to keep up with you.I run to stop the feelings flooding in,Keep moving, doing and updating my kin,I run […]

21 Jul 19
Where Lions and Lionesses Roar

It’s raining hailstone, mother Nature stoning destruction on her tenants. She is so high on anger an addiction it has become. She sends down pain that is icy cold on their backs. The dilapidated house she sees everywhere. what is left of once her glorious home? The Remnant of spoilt and decay is here to […]

21 Jul 19
Living an Ecumenical Life

Dr. Dobson doesn’t think that the suffering of those in USBP custody is a crisis.

21 Jul 19
WJHL | Tri-Cities News & Weather
Storm Team 11 Forecast:Good evening!  Mostly cloudy skies tonight with a 30 percent chance of rain. Low: 70 Rain chances go up throughout the day Monday with waves of showers and storms. While the best chances of any organized severe weather is to our north and west at this point, a couple strong storms containing gusty winds are possible during the afternoon. Chance of rain: 80%. High: 80 Some of the heaviest rain is expected Monday night and Tuesday morning. 1 to 2 inches of rain could fall in many spots so watch for localized flooding. Never drive through flooded roadways! Chance of rain: 90%. Low: 66 We have a 70 percent chance of rain Tuesday. Most of the rain is expected during the first half of the day. Plan on skies slowly clearing during the afternoon and evening as a cold front brings drier air and almost a fall-like feel. High: 76 Get this: Wednesday will start off with temperatures in the mid 50s with highs in the upper 70s to near 80 degrees with a lot of sunshine, which is cooler than average for late July. Temperatures will slowly climb late week with little to no rain as of now.
21 Jul 19
News Archives Uk

Britain wants a heatwave this week, but not before a storm brings torrential rain and strong gales to some areas. The Met Office on Sunday and Monday, with thunderstorms, heavy rain and a risk of flooding. Rain and strong winds were therefore forecast to hit parts of Northern Ireland, north-west England and Wales on Sunday. […]

21 Jul 19
WYTV
KINSMAN, Ohio (WYTV) – More than five inches of rain fell in a little under an hour Saturday in northern Trumbull County. The short, intense storm caused flash flooding. Rescue workers called this the worst devastation Trumbull County has seen in more than 30 years. One driver, Steven Texter, of Jamestown, Pennsylvania, got stuck on the roads in Kinsman during the storm. He told WYTV the storm didn’t look that bad. “Coming through here it got so heavy. I said, ‘What’s going on?’ I went through this water and said, ‘Oh man, I made a mistake.'” Texter went on to say his car was flooded. “There’s a car in front of me — [that] truck came by, splashed my car, [the water] must have hit my battery and it just killed the car right there.” A bridge in Kinsman collapsed during that storm. Over 30 homes were evacuated Sunday. Motorists were also stranded on Route 11. The highway was shut down for several hours until flood waters went down.
21 Jul 19
Bon Bon Lifestyle Webazine

https://ift.tt/eA8V8J Underneath the 330-acre park in Manhattan, trains run to and from Albany, Niagara Falls and beyond. Vía https://ift.tt/2Z3AnBN

21 Jul 19
WTNH.com
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut Insurance Commissioner Andrew N. Mais is urging homeowners to review their insurance policies before the upcoming tropical storm season. Peak hurricane season in Connecticut begins in mid-August and runs through late October. Mais says policyholders should discuss with an agent or insurance company if they have appropriate and adequate coverage. While homeowners, condo and renters insurance cover many types of storm damage, he notes that damage from flooding is excluded. Separate policies can be purchased from the federal National Flood Insurance Program or a private insurer. He says now is the time to buy those policies, considering there’s a 30-day waiting period before the policy takes effect. The insurance department has a webpage with resources for consumers. Connecticut also has the CTPrepares Mobile App to receive real-time emergency notifications.
21 Jul 19
Mike Kempster

Four years ago, after completing Land’s End to John O Groats (LEJOG), I searched for another challenge and found the Manche to Med (M2M), the English Channel to the Mediterranean. For the past three years I just haven’t been able to find the time to give it a go; however, this year I did. Not […]

21 Jul 19
WCBD
DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCBD) – Dorchester County will be upgrading the drainage system on Renau Boulevard at the Rumphs Hill Creek crossing to improve safety and reduce flooding in the area. The upgrade helps repair and enlarge the drainage system that has been damaged or eroded from a series of weather events. Renau Boulevard will have to close. The road closure begins July 22 and is expected to remain in place until September 23. A detour will be in place. Officials say they will be replacing the current pipe crossing with a box culvert, adding new guard rails, and installing new pavement. Sea Island Land Development will be completing the project. The detours for the road are as follows: Detour to Highway 78 Renau Boulevard > Right on Lake Drive > Right on McMakin Street > Left on Pete Ewers Drive > Highway 78 Detour from Highway 78 Highway 78 > Pete Ewers Drive > Right on McMakin Street > Left on Lake Drive > Left on Renau Boulevard
21 Jul 19
BRProud.com
CROWLEY, La. (AP) — Some Louisiana farmers say they’ve never seen storm damage worse than Hurricane Barry left behind, but the LSU AgCenter says that statewide crop damage was minimal. AgCenter and federal Farm Service Agency workers are checking crop damage, and it could be a few weeks before assessments are complete, state Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain said in a news release Thursday. “While the damage was not widespread across the state, we have farmers who were greatly impacted,” Strain said. He said he has been talking with U.S. Department of Agriculture officials and Gov. John Bel Edwards about whether to declare an agriculture disaster. The AgCenter’s rice, soybean and corn specialists also said that severe damage was local, Farmer Jeffrey Sylvester of Whiteville in St. Landry Parish told the AgCenter he had 700 acres of soybeans submerged, and his rice crop, which was in the heading stage, is probably lost. “I’m seeing more water over my crops than I’ve ever seen, and it’s still rising,” he said Tuesday. Ricihard Fontenot of the Evangeline Parish community of Vidrine said water didn’t cover his rice, but he could water-ski in his soybean fields after 9 to 20 inches of rain in his area July 14. “It just came down our alley and didn’t let up,” he said. Overall, overcast weather after Barry helped plants recover, Evangeline Parish county agent Todd Fontenot said. Most of Avoyelles Parish got 7 to 11 inches of rain, with 19 inches in Cottonport, said parish agent Justin Dufour. He said much of the corn crop was close to harvest and flooding would be a problem if drainage was slow. Avoyelles Parish farmer Scott Williams said only isolated parts of his corn were pushed down to the ground but soybeans flooded. He said the area got about 3 inches of rain on July 13 and 5 to 6 the next day. “It was like an ocean,” he said. Boyd Padgett, LSU AgCenter state soybean specialist, said most of the state’s soybeans appeared to be doing well after the storm, except in isolated areas of flooding. Beans covered by water for very long wouldn’t do well, and diseases develop in humid, wet stands. County agent Andrew Granger said 1,000 to 1,500 acres of flowering rice was submerged in the Henry and Intracoastal City areas of Vermilion Parish. He said about 3,000 to 4,000 acres of sugarcane were left with standing water, but flooded sugarcane did well after hurricanes Rita and Ike. Some cattle were stranded by the storm, he said, so some cattle owners are trying to get their herds to higher ground while others are shuttling hay. “It could have been a whole lot worse,” Granger said. Charles Payne said storm surge the evening of July 13 covered all 600 acres of rice at Live Oak Plantation south of Henry and stranded about 300 cows with calves on high ground. But at least this was fresh water, rather than the salt water surge from previous storms. “That’s the only reason our cattle are going to make it,” he said.