Football Hooligans

22 May 19
The Irish Sun
A DRUNK Derby fan slapped a female steward in the face after he was refused entry to the Liberty Stadium. The incident was caught on camera at Swansea’s final home game of the season against Frank Lampard’s side. The intoxicated Derby fan hit the steward in the face Edward Dylan Price went to the game at the Liberty Stadium on his own Derby supporter Edward Dylan Price, from Aberporth, was not allowed into the stadium because of his intoxicated state, a court heard. He started to argue with the stewards before he slapped Iona James in the face with his right hand. Price pleaded guilty to a count of assault by beating at Swansea Magistrates’ Court. The Rams fan was sentenced to a 12-month community order with a nine month alcohol treatment requirement. THREE YEAR BAN He was fined £50, has to pay £50 to the victim and has been given a football banning order – which will stop him attending a match in England or Wales for the next three years. Prosecutor Julie Sullivan told the court: “He had been drinking from 2pm and the incident took place around 8pm. “He got a lift into Swansea and went to a pub near the Liberty Stadium, excited because Derby were playing Swansea. “He’d gone to get his ticket then went back to the pub and drank more alcohol. “He told police during interview he is an idiot when he is drunk and a near alcoholic.” [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN SPORT” posts_category=”1″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”recent” /] Mitigating John Allchurch said: “The defendant is self-employed as a painter decorator and lives in Aberporth. “He is a keen Derby County supporter, his mother lives in Derby, and has followed them for some years. “He had too much to drink and slapped one steward during the course of an argument. He fully accepts the offence.” Price pleaded guilty to a count of assault by beating at Swansea Magistrates’ Court [bc_video video_id=”6014974652001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Moment hooligans punch police trying to remove fan in shocking mass brawl at Bolton game”]      
22 May 19
The Scottish Sun
A DRUNK Derby fan slapped a female steward in the face after he was refused entry to the Liberty Stadium. The incident was caught on camera at Swansea’s final home game of the season against Frank Lampard’s side. The intoxicated Derby fan hit the steward in the face Edward Dylan Price went to the game at the Liberty Stadium on his own Derby supporter Edward Dylan Price, from Aberporth, was not allowed into the stadium because of his intoxicated state, a court heard. He started to argue with the stewards before he slapped Iona James in the face with his right hand. Price pleaded guilty to a count of assault by beating at Swansea Magistrates’ Court. The Rams fan was sentenced to a 12-month community order with a nine month alcohol treatment requirement. THREE YEAR BAN He was fined £50, has to pay £50 to the victim and has been given a football banning order – which will stop him attending a match in England or Wales for the next three years. Prosecutor Julie Sullivan told the court: “He had been drinking from 2pm and the incident took place around 8pm. “He got a lift into Swansea and went to a pub near the Liberty Stadium, excited because Derby were playing Swansea. “He’d gone to get his ticket then went back to the pub and drank more alcohol. “He told police during interview he is an idiot when he is drunk and a near alcoholic.” [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN SPORT” posts_category=”1″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”recent” /] Mitigating John Allchurch said: “The defendant is self-employed as a painter decorator and lives in Aberporth. “He is a keen Derby County supporter, his mother lives in Derby, and has followed them for some years. “He had too much to drink and slapped one steward during the course of an argument. He fully accepts the offence.” Price pleaded guilty to a count of assault by beating at Swansea Magistrates’ Court [bc_video video_id=”6014974652001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Moment hooligans punch police trying to remove fan in shocking mass brawl at Bolton game”]      
22 May 19
The Sun
A DRUNK Derby fan slapped a female steward in the face after he was refused entry to the Liberty Stadium. The incident was caught on camera at Swansea’s final home game of the season against Frank Lampard’s side. The intoxicated Derby fan hit the steward in the face Edward Dylan Price went to the game at the Liberty Stadium on his own Derby supporter Edward Dylan Price, from Aberporth, was not allowed into the stadium because of his intoxicated state, a court heard. He started to argue with the stewards before he slapped Iona James in the face with his right hand. Price pleaded guilty to a count of assault by beating at Swansea Magistrates’ Court. The Rams fan was sentenced to a 12-month community order with a nine month alcohol treatment requirement. THREE YEAR BAN He was fined £50, has to pay £50 to the victim and has been given a football banning order – which will stop him attending a match in England or Wales for the next three years. Prosecutor Julie Sullivan told the court: “He had been drinking from 2pm and the incident took place around 8pm. “He got a lift into Swansea and went to a pub near the Liberty Stadium, excited because Derby were playing Swansea. “He’d gone to get his ticket then went back to the pub and drank more alcohol. “He told police during interview he is an idiot when he is drunk and a near alcoholic.” [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN SPORT” posts_category=”0″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”recent” /] Mitigating John Allchurch said: “The defendant is self-employed as a painter decorator and lives in Aberporth. “He is a keen Derby County supporter, his mother lives in Derby, and has followed them for some years. “He had too much to drink and slapped one steward during the course of an argument. He fully accepts the offence.” Price pleaded guilty to a count of assault by beating at Swansea Magistrates’ Court [bc_video video_id=”6014974652001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Moment hooligans punch police trying to remove fan in shocking mass brawl at Bolton game”]      
22 May 19
sungamediablog

I grew up as a hardcore competitive athlete. I learned to cultivate perseverance to run the extra mile at full speed, teamwork to pass the ball, and a disciplined work ethic to challenge myself to the next level. But it was not always pretty. I can recall bloody backyard football games, injuries in varsity basketball, […]

22 May 19

After covering how Britain got itself into a European Parliamentary mess, European Politics columnist Aurora Matteini takes us to another European country undergoing turmoil ahead of these historic elections. On 24th April, a day before the 74th Italian Liberation Day which honors the end of the Nazi occupation of Italy and the collapse of the […]

22 May 19
Travel and Tour World

The lagoon city holds back the right to reprimand visitors with inappropriate behavior the same way that police tackle football hooligans: with an order that forbid them from returning to the scene of their offence.     Source: Travelandtourworld.

22 May 19
Ebook Mania

Amazon.com Review

In the States, Nick Hornby is best know as the author of and , two wickedly funny novels about being thirtysomething and going nowhere fast. In Britain he is revered for his status as a fanatical football writer (sorry, fanatical soccer writer), owing to Fever Pitch–which is both an autobiography and a footballing Bible rolled into one. Hornby pinpoints 1968 as his formative year–the year he turned 11, the year his parents separated, and the year his father first took him to watch Arsenal play. The author quickly moved “way beyond fandom” into an extreme obsession that has dominated his life, loves, and relationships. His father had initially hoped that Saturday afternoon matches would draw the two closer together, but instead Hornby became completely besotted with the game at the expense of any conversation: “Football may have provided us with a new medium through which we could communicate, but that was not to say that we used it, or what we chose to say was necessarily positive.” Girlfriends also played second fiddle to one ball and 11 men. He fantasizes that even if a girlfriend “went into labor at an impossible moment” he would not be able to help out until after the final whistle.

Fever Pitch is not a typical memoir–there are no chapters, just a series of match reports falling into three time frames (childhood, young adulthood, manhood). While watching the May 2, 1972, Reading v. Arsenal match, it became embarrassingly obvious to the then 15-year-old that his white, suburban, middle-class roots made him a wimp with no sense of identity: “Yorkshire men, Lancastrians, Scots, the Irish, blacks, the rich, the poor, even Americans and Australians have something they can sit in pubs and bars and weep about.” But a boy from Maidenhead could only dream of coming from a place with “its own tube station and West Indian community and terrible, insoluble social problems.”

Fever Pitch reveals the very special intricacies of British football, which readers new to the game will find astonishing, and which Hornby presents with remarkable humor and honesty–the “unique” chants sung at matches, the cold rain-soaked terraces, giant cans of warm beer, the trains known as football specials carrying fans to and from matches in prisonlike conditions, bottles smashing on the tracks, thousands of policemen waiting in anticipation for the cargo of hooligans. The sport and one team in particular have crept into every aspect of Hornby’s life–making him see the world through Arsenal-tinted spectacles. –Naomi Gesinger

From Publishers Weekly

Brought to print to take advantage of America’s presumed fascination with the ’94 World Cup (the first ever held here), Fever Pitch is a 24-year obsessional diary of English club football (soccer, to us Americans) games Hornby has witnessed and the way these games have become inextricable from his personal life. Hornby is the kind of fanatic who merely shrugs about the “tyranny” the sport exerts over his life–the mumbled excuses he must give at every missed christening or birthday party as a result of a schedule conflict. “Sometimes hurting someone,” he writes, “is unavoidable.” These occasions tend to bring out “disappointment and tired impatience” in his friends and family, but it is when he is exposed as a “worthless, shallow worm” that the similarly stricken reader can relate to the high costs of caring deeply about a game that means nothing to one’s more well-adjusted friends. These moments are fleeting, however. The book has not been tailored for American audiences, so readers lacking a knowledge of English club football’s rules, traditions, history and players will be left completely in the dark by Hornby’s obscure references. Unfortunately, he has neither Roger Angell’s ability to take us inside the game nor the pathos of Frederick Exley’s brilliantly disturbed autobiographical trilogy. Though Hornby does show flashes of real humor, Fever Pitch features mainly pedestrian insights on life and sport, and then it’s on to the next game–the equivalent, for an American reader, of a nil-nil tie. Author appearances.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

22 May 19
News Archives Uk

During Tommy Robinson's tenure as leader of the English Defense League (EDL), the group's markets cost more than £ 10m. Thousands of officers battled to keep the anti-Islam organization's supporters under control as they rampaged through town centers and clashed with counter-protesters. Robinson was then known – a convicted criminal who knew himself with football […]

21 May 19
Walkaboutdoc's Blog

These could be signs of the spring The grass coming up soft and green And though you look twice You’ll find no piles of ice And moose moms get protective and mean. Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 […]

21 May 19
doghead

I remember that I met Jenny Fred in a pub in Hammersmith called the Dog & Bone, and she had told me that it was related to a bar called Funkspiel, where all the handlers used to hang out. Back in the day I had a handler in the sense that someone from a K9 […]

20 May 19
Edward Lawrence

Now is the time to put your vote to good use, rather than digging in and fighting with other Brits. Remainers and Leavers should back the Labour Party to fight the Far Right

20 May 19
Daavi's Column

By Bridget Opoku Hooliganism in football has become commonplace in areas where there is a high level of intensity and competitiveness. Along the years, this canker has driven away many people from the game. Ghana, a perfect embodiment of a true African football nation has had its fair share of the implications of hooliganism. In […]

20 May 19
PERSPECTIVES OF OUR WORLD

May 2019 Zuidwal The district of Zuidwal in The Hague is part of the centre of the city, with still a lot of old houses with importance for the history of this place.Zuidwal is part of the “Oude centrum”, the old centre of The Hague which was founded as a settlement near the court of […]

20 May 19
The Selby Chronicle

Selby’s own Roy Corkhill, 63, is one of the world’s most successful professional gamblers. Two weeks ago, ‘The Buller Street Bookie-basher’ was in the Casino de Monte-Carlo, gathered around a roulette table with Tom Hanks, Ringo Starr and George Bush Jr. “Scarlet Johansson was begging me to go to her room but, as a professional […]

20 May 19
Arcynewsy

Noh rioting before the football game of the third division between Carl Zeiss Jena and Munich in 1860 sits a 26-year-old man in custody. The man is accused, among other things, of having thrown a square pound of wood on the heads of police officers. Two policemen, despite wearing a helmet, suffered a head injury […]