Gaastra

13 Feb 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1596089-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1596089-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1596089-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1596089-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Marcel and Patricia Chappuis (Nye County Sheriff’s Office) Caleb Hill, 29, of Pahrump (Nye County Sheriff’s Office) The home on the 7600 block of Painted Dunes Drive, where Marcel and Patricia Chappuis were arrested in connection with an ongoing child abuse investigation into their Amargosa Valley boarding school, is pictured on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2018. (Rio Lacanlale/Las Vegas Review-Journal) Officials took steps to shut down an Amargosa Valley boarding school Wednesday after the owner and his wife were arrested in Las Vegas as part of an ongoing abuse investigation. Marcel Chappuis, 72, a professional psychologist who owns Northwest Academy, and his 66-year-old wife, Patricia, each face 43 counts of allowing child abuse or neglect. They operated the school for at-risk teens and adolescents. Most of the counts stem from an investigation into the school’s tap water, which officials have said contains high levels of arsenic, but Patricia Chappuis also faces two felony counts of child abuse or neglect in connection with “previous physical altercations with students,” Nye County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Adam Tippetts said Wednesday. The contaminated water was discovered while the Sheriff’s Office was investigating unrelated allegations of child abuse against staff member Caleb Hill, 29, by a former employee and a former student. Hill was arrested Jan. 29 on suspicion of child abuse, but formal charges had not been filed in Beatty Justice Court as of Wednesday afternoon. Investigators determined that the Northwest Academy’s water had been contaminated for more than two years, and that school officials had been limiting students to three small water bottles daily. But the school often ran out of bottled water, sometimes going without it for up to three days, Tippets said. “Even during the hot summer months, students were either required to drink the tap water or nothing at all,” he said, noting that students also drank the tap water when they were given their medications. Patricia Chappuis also instructed staff to cook and clean with the contaminated tap water, witnesses told detectives. “They also reported the empty Sparkletts bottles were brought into the kitchen and staff were told that if anyone asked if they used the bottled water for cooking, that they were to tell them yes,” Tippetts said. Las Vegas arrests News of the two additional arrests in the case broke early Wednesday, after the Metropolitan Police Department, which was assisting the Sheriff’s Office, announced that it had taken a man and woman with felony warrants for child abuse into custody just before 11:55 p.m. Tuesday in the 7600 block of Painted Dunes Drive. Metro later identified the pair as Marcel and Patricia Chappuis. A knock at the door of the Painted Dunes home, which sits in a gated community with its own golf course near West Ann Road and North Durango Drive, was not answered Wednesday afternoon. The couple’s connection to the home was unclear, as the two are known to live in a home on the school’s property. Records show that the Las Vegas home is owned by a limited liability company in Lakeway, Texas. In a brief phone interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal days after Hill’s arrest, Patricia Chappuis defended the academy, saying, “There have been a multitude of inaccuracies and falsities reported. There have been no findings of abuse or neglect by Sheriff (Sharon) Wehrly or any of the licensing boards.” She declined to address the arsenic in the school’s water during that interview or the other allegations that had surfaced by then. Lawyer Richard Schonfeld, who is representing both the school and the couple, declined to comment Wednesday afternoon. But in a Feb. 4 statement, he said, “We ask that the public not rush to judgment as we are confident that the investigative process will reveal that Northwest Academy’s goal is to provide a safe and productive environment for its students.” The Division of Public and Behavioral Health said Wednesday that the school would surrender its child care license after all students were relocated. “The individuals arrested do not provide direct supervision of the children currently onsite,” the division said in a statement. “Northwest Academy Staff are working to move children to alternative placements as soon as possible. DCFS is assisting with finding alternative placements for the children currently onsite at NWA.” DCFS refers to the Division of Child and Family Services. Contaminated water A notification of the contaminated water was sent to parents on Dec. 13, according to an email obtained by the Review-Journal. It stated that the contamination was detected Nov. 6 and was caused by “erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.” But, according to a state Division of Environmental Protection spokeswoman, Northwest Academy stopped treating its water in October 2016, and had been working with the agency since January 2017 to treat its water. The school’s water supply contained 0.032 milligrams per liter of arsenic, three times the EPA’s recommended 0.01 milligrams per liter, though that falls below the EPA’s former cutoff of 0.05 milligrams per liter. The school was given a formal notice in February 2018 that it would need to treat the water by Dec. 31, but the school missed the deadline. ‘It’s about time’ Since the announcement of the ongoing abuse investigation, several allegations from former students and their parents have surfaced, including from 13-year-old Tanner Reynolds, whose mother pulled him out of the school in January after hearing from other mothers about incidents at the school. Tanner now alleges that he was slammed and pinned to the ground by Hill on one occasion in December. Brothers Tristan Groom, 15, and Jade Gaastra, 23, spoke out against the school the morning after the Sheriff’s Office announced the investigation. Tristan, who was 12 when he attended the school, alleged that the abuse had been going on since at least late 2015. His older brother, who was 17 when he was a student from 2012 to 2013, accused the school’s staff of favoritism but said he could not recall any instances of severe abuse during his time there. On Wednesday, the boys’ mother, Nicole Bayer, was celebrating the news that Marcel and Patricia Chappuis had been arrested. “It’s about time. I always knew something was up,” she told the Review-Journal. Marcel and Patricia Chappuis were being held Wednesday at the Clark County Detention Center on $100,000 bail. Jail records show Patricia Chappuis was booked under the name “Patricia Mathis.” The couple’s initial appearance in Las Vegas Justice Court is scheduled for Thursday morning. Tippets said they are expected to be extradited to the Nye County Detention Center in Pahrump within the next week. Hill remained at the Nye County Detention Center, where he is awaiting arraignment, jail records show. Health inspections In addition to issues surrounding the school’s tap water, the Division of Public and Behavioral Health found in March 2017 during one of its biannual inspections of the school that staff never reported an incident two months earlier in which two students were found in the gym “having sexual contact,” according to a report of the division’s findings. The inspector also observed that the school was not meeting daily nutritional needs for each of its students, as fruits and vegetables were not being provided during lunch, the document stated. Northwest Academy appointed a “kitchen manager” as a result “to ensure that the appropriate inventory is available.” That same inspection also led to the school implementing a “daily shift change report,” after the inspector conducted a review of the school’s records and found that Marcel Chappuis failed to maintain counseling or therapy case notes “for students with self-harming behaviors,” according to the document. Contact Rio Lacanlale at rlacanlale@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0381. Follow @riolacanlale on Twitter. Review-Journal staff writer Jessie Bekker contributed to this report. [rjgmap]7600 Painted Dunes Drive, Las Vegas, NV[/rjgmap]
12 Feb 19
Globalmarketers

Watersports Suits Report Coverage: The report Watersports Suits market covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the Global(Asia Pacific, North America, Europe, Latin America and Rest of the World.) Watersports Suits market for 2013-2022. To calculate the market estimate, the report considers the revenue produced from the Watersports Suits market from various regions. […]

06 Feb 19
Markets n Trends Analysis

MarketResearchNest.com adds “Global Windsurfing Harnesses Market Research Report 2019” new report to its research database. The report spread across 110 pages with multiple tables and figures in it. A windsurfing harness is part of the trapeze used in the sports of windsurfing and kitesurfing to connect the rider to the rig by a line attached […]

06 Feb 19
Markets n Trends Analysis

MarketResearchNest.com adds “Global Windsurfing Harness Lines Market Research Report 2019” new report to its research database. The report spread across 110 pages with multiple tables and figures in it. When hooked in to your harness lines you become interconnected to your gear. This allows you to become lighter on your feet, more easily access foot […]

05 Feb 19
Ozone Market Reports

Watersports Suits-Global Market Status & Trend Report 2013-2023 Top 20 Countries Data offers a comprehensive analysis on Watersports Suits industry, standing on the readers’ perspective, delivering detailed market data in Global major 20 countries and penetrating insights. No matter the client is industry insider, potential entrant or investor, the report will provides useful data and […]

03 Feb 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1587515-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1587515-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1587515-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1587515-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Nicole Bayer, from left, with he sons Jade Gaastra, 23, and Tristan Groom, 15, are photographed outside of the Pahrump Community Library in Pahrump, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Bayer’ sons are former students of Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco A house on the property of Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco A decorated title outside the office of Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Caleb Hill, 29, of Pahrump (Nye County Sheriffճ Office) AMARGOSA VALLEY — Nicole Bayer remembers well the Sunday evening in May 2016 when she raced down State Line Road in her pickup truck to the private boarding school for at-risk teens and adolescents. It had been weeks since anyone at Northwest Academy had given her an update on her 12-year-old son, and she’d had enough, the Pahrump mother recalled Saturday, two days after news broke that the school is now the subject of an ongoing child abuse investigation. The Nye County Sheriff’s Office opened the investigation on Monday after a former student reported being “assaulted and slammed” on several occasions by teacher Caleb Hill, 29. Hill was arrested and charged this week with child abuse, officials said. The investigation also revealed arsenic in the school’s water, resulting in skin rashes linked to the water conditions, officials have said. The news of the investigation didn’t come as much of a shock to Bayer. On that night in May 2016, when school officials finally released her son, Tristan Groom, his right eye was black and swollen shut, and he had a large rug-burn on the right side of his face, Bayer recounted in an interview Saturday with the Las Vegas Review-Journal. An employee explained that the boy had gotten into an altercation with a staff member. “He had an altercation with a staff member and you didn’t call me?” Bayer recalled yelling. She helped her son into the truck, and the two never looked back — until Thursday evening, when details emerged about the investigation. “I wasn’t too surprised,” Tristan, now a soft-spoken 15-year-old, said Saturday as he looked down at his hands. “It’s about time.” Academy responds On Saturday evening, Patti Chappuis, wife of Northwest Academy owner Marcel Chappuis, defended the academy in a brief phone interview. “There have been a multitude of inaccuracies and falsities reported,” she said. “There have been no findings of abuse or neglect by Sheriff (Sharon) Wehrly or any of the licensing boards.” On the school’s website, which had been taken down by Saturday morning, Marcel Chappuis was listed as a professional psychologist. The Nevada State Board of Psychological Examiners lists his license as active with no disciplinary record. Patti Chappuis did not address the arsenic in the school’s water, but when asked about Hill’s charges, she said, “That doesn’t mean it’s true. He is accused.” The Sheriff’s Office and Department of Family Services officials served a search warrant at the school Tuesday and interviewed all students and on-site staff members. In addition to reports of abuse by Hill, students also told detectives they had suffered injuries and broken bones at the school and were denied medical care. Most of the broken bones were toes. “You’re going to speak to more families, students, staff — past and present — who will rally on our behalf,” Patti Chappuis said in response to allegations against the school and its staff. She referred all other questions to their attorney, Richard Schonfeld, who, she said, would not be taking calls until Monday. “Northwest Academy is doing business as usual,” she added. The state Division of Child and Family Services made the call to allow the school to remain open, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Student’s experience Tristan, who has blond hair and a soft lisp when he speaks, said Saturday that he couldn’t believe the school was allowed to stay open after all that had surfaced in the past week. He spent six months at Northwest Academy, and during that time he was allowed to call his mom just three times and saw his family twice, he said. “I never knew if he was going to call. And they never called me to tell me what’s going on,” Bayer said, raising her voice. “I’m his mother, and they refused to give me any information.” During her final visit before pulling Tristan out of the school, Bayer recalled, she noticed a bruise on her son’s face. She glanced at the employees present during the visit, but asked anyway: “Where did you get that bruise?” “I don’t know. Probably during gym,” Tristan said, shrugging it off. On Saturday, Tristan said he couldn’t remember a time that he ever felt safe enough to tell his mom what was happening at school, because his phone calls and visits were monitored. Two years later, he said he still has vivid memories of being slammed by staff members “for no reason.” “Sometimes staff would even let other students fight each other,” he said, looking at his mom. “They wouldn’t stop it or anything. It was just fight, fight, fight. It was like their TV show.” ‘A lot of good people who work here’ At the school Saturday morning there were no signs that an investigation was underway. From the school’s parking lot, students, who could not be seen behind a tall, white fence, could be heard talking and yelling to one another. They were competing in a volleyball tournament, according to a shift supervisor, who identified himself only as Josh. “I know what’s in the news is bad, but we do have a lot of good people who work here,” he said, adding that he has been working for the school for about 18 months. From Highway 373, drivers passing through Amargosa Valley can spot the large, sandy-colored warehouse that sits on the school’s campus. It is not clear what the building is used for, but several people could be seen Saturday walking in and out of the building. A set of stairs leading to the entrance appears to be the same staircase shown in footage released Friday evening by the Sheriff’s Office. In the video, taken at some point during the early stages of the investigation, two deputies assist an injured student wearing a large boot or cast on his foot down the stairs. ’Night and day’ Tristan’s older brother, 23-year-old Jade Gaastra, attended Northwest Academy from 2012 to 2013. The school was recommended to Bayer by Gaastra’s juvenile probation officer. Gaastra was 17 when he completed the program, and during his time there had earned his GED. Today he has a full-time job as a supervisor with a cell tower company — a position he said he earned and is proud to hold. So when Tristan began acting out, Bayer ultimately decided to send him to Northwest Academy, “because I thought the program did wonders for Jade,” she said Saturday. “If I knew then what I know now …” she said. “Never again.” Gaastra shook his head in disagreement and glanced at his brother. He said he couldn’t recall any severe abuse when he was a student, but the school still had its problems. He criticized what he called favoritism by the staff and psychological evaluations that he alleged resulted in everyone being “doped up.” He was prescribed Adderall for ADHD, although he said he isn’t sure he even suffers from the disorder. Tristan was prescribed five different medications when he arrived at the school, his mother said. Bayer alleges that Tristan’s on-site doctors failed to disclose why his son needed those medications. Tristan said his six months at the school were a haze, days blurring together until he finally refused to take the pills. He said he got in trouble, but he didn’t care. The drugs just made him feel worse. By the time he had been taken out of the school, his mother recalled, he was withdrawn and mostly kept to himself. “It took over a year for us to wean him off all the medications,” she said, adding that she took her son to another doctor for a second opinion, and that he no longer takes the medications once prescribed by the school. Bayer could not recall which doctor prescribed Tristan with the medications, “because I never got to talk to him.” But she kept the pill bottles. Bayer and her sons aren’t sure of what could have been a possible turning point for the school, because the difference between the teens’ experiences are “night and day,” Bayer said. “I just know it’s about dang time they fall from what they’ve done,” she said. Contact Rio Lacanlale at rlacanlale@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0381. Follow @riolacanlale on Twitter.
03 Feb 19
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1588746-4 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1588746-4 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1588746-4 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1588746-4 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Nicole Bayer, from left, with he sons Jade Gaastra, 23, and Tristan Groom, 15, are photographed outside of the Pahrump Community Library in Pahrump, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Bayer’ sons are former students of Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco A house on the property of Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco A decorated title outside the office of Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Northwest Academy in Amargosa Valley, Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal) @Erik_Verduzco Caleb Hill, 29, of Pahrump (Nye County Sheriffճ Office) AMARGOSA VALLEY — Nicole Bayer remembers well the Sunday evening in May 2016 when she raced down State Line Road in her pickup truck to the private boarding school for at-risk teens and adolescents. It had been weeks since anyone at Northwest Academy had given her an update on her 12-year-old son, and she’d had enough, the Pahrump mother recalled Saturday, two days after news broke that the school is now the subject of an ongoing child abuse investigation. The Nye County Sheriff’s Office opened the investigation on Monday after a former student reported being “assaulted and slammed” on several occasions by teacher Caleb Hill, 29. Hill was arrested and charged this week with child abuse, officials said. The investigation also revealed arsenic in the school’s water, resulting in skin rashes linked to the water conditions, officials have said. The news of the investigation didn’t come as much of a shock to Bayer. On that night in May 2016, when school officials finally released her son, Tristan Groom, his right eye was black and swollen shut, and he had a large rug-burn on the right side of his face, Bayer recounted in an interview Saturday with the Las Vegas Review-Journal. An employee explained that the boy had gotten into an altercation with a staff member. “He had an altercation with a staff member and you didn’t call me?” Bayer recalled yelling. She helped her son into the truck, and the two never looked back — until Thursday evening, when details emerged about the investigation. “I wasn’t too surprised,” Tristan, now a soft-spoken 15-year-old, said Saturday as he looked down at his hands. “It’s about time.” Academy responds On Saturday evening, Patti Chappuis, wife of Northwest Academy owner Marcel Chappuis, defended the academy in a brief phone interview. “There have been a multitude of inaccuracies and falsities reported,” she said. “There have been no findings of abuse or neglect by Sheriff (Sharon) Wehrly or any of the licensing boards.” On the school’s website, which had been taken down by Saturday morning, Marcel Chappuis was listed as a professional psychologist. The Nevada State Board of Psychological Examiners lists his license as active with no disciplinary record. Patti Chappuis did not address the arsenic in the school’s water, but when asked about Hill’s charges, she said, “That doesn’t mean it’s true. He is accused.” The Sheriff’s Office and Department of Family Services officials served a search warrant at the school Tuesday and interviewed all students and on-site staff members. In addition to reports of abuse by Hill, students also told detectives they had suffered injuries and broken bones at the school and were denied medical care. Most of the broken bones were toes. “You’re going to speak to more families, students, staff — past and present — who will rally on our behalf,” Patti Chappuis said in response to allegations against the school and its staff. She referred all other questions to their attorney, Richard Schonfeld, who, she said, would not be taking calls until Monday. “Northwest Academy is doing business as usual,” she added. The state Division of Child and Family Services made the call to allow the school to remain open, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Student’s experience Tristan, who has blond hair and a soft lisp when he speaks, said Saturday that he couldn’t believe the school was allowed to stay open after all that had surfaced in the past week. He spent six months at Northwest Academy, and during that time he was allowed to call his mom just three times and saw his family twice, he said. “I never knew if he was going to call. And they never called me to tell me what’s going on,” Bayer said, raising her voice. “I’m his mother, and they refused to give me any information.” During her final visit before pulling Tristan out of the school, Bayer recalled, she noticed a bruise on her son’s face. She glanced at the employees present during the visit, but asked anyway: “Where did you get that bruise?” “I don’t know. Probably during gym,” Tristan said, shrugging it off. On Saturday, Tristan said he couldn’t remember a time that he ever felt safe enough to tell his mom what was happening at school, because his phone calls and visits were monitored. Two years later, he said he still has vivid memories of being slammed by staff members “for no reason.” “Sometimes staff would even let other students fight each other,” he said, looking at his mom. “They wouldn’t stop it or anything. It was just fight, fight, fight. It was like their TV show.” ‘A lot of good people who work here’ At the school Saturday morning there were no signs that an investigation was underway. From the school’s parking lot, students, who could not be seen behind a tall, white fence, could be heard talking and yelling to one another. They were competing in a volleyball tournament, according to a shift supervisor, who identified himself only as Josh. “I know what’s in the news is bad, but we do have a lot of good people who work here,” he said, adding that he has been working for the school for about 18 months. From Highway 373, drivers passing through Amargosa Valley can spot the large, sandy-colored warehouse that sits on the school’s campus. It is not clear what the building is used for, but several people could be seen Saturday walking in and out of the building. A set of stairs leading to the entrance appears to be the same staircase shown in footage released Friday evening by the Sheriff’s Office. In the video, taken at some point during the early stages of the investigation, two deputies assist an injured student wearing a large boot or cast on his foot down the stairs. ’Night and day’ Tristan’s older brother, 23-year-old Jade Gaastra, attended Northwest Academy from 2012 to 2013. The school was recommended to Bayer by Gaastra’s juvenile probation officer. Gaastra was 17 when he completed the program, and during his time there had earned his GED. Today he has a full-time job as a supervisor with a cell tower company — a position he said he earned and is proud to hold. So when Tristan began acting out, Bayer ultimately decided to send him to Northwest Academy, “because I thought the program did wonders for Jade,” she said Saturday. “If I knew then what I know now …” she said. “Never again.” Gaastra shook his head in disagreement and glanced at his brother. He said he couldn’t recall any severe abuse when he was a student, but the school still had its problems. He criticized what he called favoritism by the staff and psychological evaluations that he alleged resulted in everyone being “doped up.” He was prescribed Adderall for ADHD, although he said he isn’t sure he even suffers from the disorder. Tristan was prescribed five different medications when he arrived at the school, his mother said. Bayer alleges that Tristan’s on-site doctors failed to disclose why his son needed those medications. Tristan said his six months at the school were a haze, days blurring together until he finally refused to take the pills. He said he got in trouble, but he didn’t care. The drugs just made him feel worse. By the time he had been taken out of the school, his mother recalled, he was withdrawn and mostly kept to himself. “It took over a year for us to wean him off all the medications,” she said, adding that she took her son to another doctor for a second opinion, and that he no longer takes the medications once prescribed by the school. Bayer could not recall which doctor prescribed Tristan with the medications, “because I never got to talk to him.” But she kept the pill bottles. Bayer and her sons aren’t sure of what could have been a possible turning point for the school, because the difference between the teens’ experiences are “night and day,” Bayer said. “I just know it’s about dang time they fall from what they’ve done,” she said. Contact Rio Lacanlale at rlacanlale@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0381. Follow @riolacanlale on Twitter.
01 Feb 19
BestySells

Price: [price_with_discount](as of [price_update_date] – Details)  Welcome to the SHOBDW store, if you have any problems with our product, you can contact us at any time, we will do our best to serve you. Have a good time shopping! ♡ ^ _ ^ ♡ ► Features It is made of high quality materials, durable enough […]

31 Jan 19
Research Reports

Wind surf masts are the wind surfing equipment attached to the wind surf board and to which the sail is attached. The wind surf mast makes up the skeleton of the wind surf setup. Wind surf masts play an important role while wind surfing as it affects the maneuvering of the surf board. An increasing […]

30 Jan 19
BestySells

Price: [price_with_discount](as of [price_update_date] – Details)  Welcome to the SHOBDW store, if you have any problems with our product, you can contact us at any time, we will do our best to serve you. Have a good time shopping! ♡ ^ _ ^ ♡ ► Features It is made of high quality material, durable enough […]

30 Jan 19
Market Growth Insight

The latest report, Windsurf Masts market enables stakeholders to gain insights into their potential consumers to construct more effective marketing strategies for the forecast period, 2019 to 2025. Most importantly, the document empowers business owners to seek information about potential consumers and where they can find them. Apart from this, the literature sheds light on […]

23 Jan 19
Tyler Dale Gaastra

Please check out the trailer for Spirit & Truth.

22 Jan 19
About Brepolis

Over the course of 2018, 148 new works were added to the Library of Latin Texts – Series A. Of these works, 91 can be attributed to 29 authors who have this year been included in the database for the first time. Four works were made available through the production of a new edition, and […]

17 Jan 19
In The Know Cycling

The Legend returnsThe driving force behind the new Fat Albert has clearly been Gerrit Gaastra. The bike guru and out-of-the box thinker has pushed us to break new ground and question the proven tread design. This realm of the unknown is where you generate innovation and create outstanding tires.Schwalbe Fat Albert front tyres offer large […]