George Herbert Walker Bush

15 Dec 18
Sunrise Short Hops

His love of America and America’s pastime continues to inspire people of all generations.

15 Dec 18
Russia News Now

…by Jonas E. Alexis and Mark Dankof Mark Dankof is the former 36th District Chairman of the Republican Party in King County/Seattle. He was an elected delegate to Texas State Republican Conventions in 1994 and 1996 and entered the United States Senate race in Delaware in 2000 as the nominated candidate of the Constitution Party against […]

15 Dec 18
Russia News Now

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo began his December 4 speech in Brussels at the German Marshall Fund with “a well-deserved tribute to America’s 41st president, George Herbert Walker Bush,” whom he praised as “an unyielding champion of freedom around the world.” It was fitting that he did so. The heart and soul of Pompeo’s remarks extolling […]

15 Dec 18
unnecessary news from earth

The second of two articles Kim Ives  December 12, 2018 (First part) After George Herbert Walker Bush died on Nov. 30 at age 94, the mainstream press favorably contrasted him to Donald Trump, portraying the former Republican president as “kinder” and “gentler,” two watchwords from his inaugural speech. But, Trump’s signature aggressivity towards immigrants is […]

15 Dec 18
Phi Quyền Chính - Anarchism: The Tao Of Anarchy

PQC: Is this for REAL? Is it why the MSM does not want to investigate or discuss? Where are other former Reagan’s high officials? Why have they remained silent? Have they recognized this extraordinary man? If this is a HOAX, what is its purpose? WANTA!BlackSwan, White Hat :     A biography every Fellow American must read […]

10 Dec 18
The American Age

“I’m not saying that there aren’t things to criticize about Bush…but I don’t see how it’s helpful… I don’t see how coloring a complex human being with such a simplified portrait is helpful for the country, for one another, for even yourself inter-personally.”

14 Dec 18
Mike the Mad Biologist

Links for you. Science: The CRISPR Baby Scandal Gets Worse by the Day Four small cities may have played an outsize role in spreading deadly flu What humpback whales can teach us about alien languages Want to Name a New Frog? A Whiskered Mouse? An Orchid? Be the Highest Bidder Why we miss the wasps […]

14 Dec 18
myndfblife

by Pete Hanebutt, NDFB Director of Public Policy The passing of President George Herbert Walker Bush is a reminder that the greatest generation is passing into the history of our great nation. Perhaps someday there will be a second “greatest generation,” a group which will lead us out of some unforeseen national calamity. But for […]

14 Dec 18
The Most Revolutionary Act

Kim Ives Part II Part I: George H.W. Bush’s Grim Legacy in Haiti After George Herbert Walker Bush died on Nov. 30 at age 94, the mainstream press favorably contrasted him to Donald Trump, portraying the former Republican president as “kinder” and “gentler,” two watchwords from his inaugural speech. But, Trump’s signature aggressivity towards immigrants […]

14 Dec 18
Press Enterprise
Like most Americans, I was saddened to hear of the passing of President George Herbert Walker Bush. Among the iconic images recently was the picture of President Bush lying in state at the Capitol with his service dog, Sully, in front of the casket. The 2-year-old Labrador retriever was loaned to President Bush by America’s VetDogs, a nonprofit that trains and places service dogs with veterans like Bush, a pilot during World War II. I say loaned because now that Sully’s mission is complete, he will return to VetDogs to be placed with another veteran. I wondered what a service dog could do for a man confined to a motorized wheelchair and was surprised to read that Sully opened and closed doors and was able to support President Bush when standing. Perhaps the most important service he provided however was more emotional than physical. Sully came to the Bush family after President Bush lost his wife of 73 years earlier this year. Even though he was loved, had family members around and constant Secret Service protection, Bush did not have a companion who gave round the clock unconditional love, support and comfort. I see a lot of men and women in my practice who have service dogs. Because my practice is psychological and not physical, my patients often have issues of depression, anxiety, fearfulness and loneliness. It’s hard to put into words the benefits I see these dogs provide. I have one client who had been attacked and traumatized, and being with her service dog is the only way she can leave her home, be around other people and lead close to a normal life. We had to fight with her apartment owners to get the dog approved but once that challenge was met, she now drives her car, goes to the store, even socializes with friends — all with the dog by her side. So many of the people I see who have been attacked and traumatized become reclusive, isolated and give up. Too often their lives are punctuated by omnipresent fears, both real and imagined, that prevent venturing out of their homes. Through no fault of their own these men and women are revictimized by memories that haunt them. When they bring their dogs into our counseling sessions, the animals sit at their feet, almost always touching or within touching distance. It is this connectedness, warmth and touch that my patients say enable them to feel safe, less alone and more hopeful. Like many service dogs, Sully was trained by prison inmates through the prison puppy project. It’s a win-win for the dogs as well as the men and women. Both get to feel useful, less alone and of tremendous value to others. Mitchell Rosen is a licensed therapist with practices in Corona and Temecula. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
14 Dec 18
Redlands Daily Facts
Like most Americans, I was saddened to hear of the passing of President George Herbert Walker Bush. Among the iconic images recently was the picture of President Bush lying in state at the Capitol with his service dog, Sully, in front of the casket. The 2-year-old Labrador retriever was loaned to President Bush by America’s VetDogs, a nonprofit that trains and places service dogs with veterans like Bush, a pilot during World War II. I say loaned because now that Sully’s mission is complete, he will return to VetDogs to be placed with another veteran. I wondered what a service dog could do for a man confined to a motorized wheelchair and was surprised to read that Sully opened and closed doors and was able to support President Bush when standing. Perhaps the most important service he provided however was more emotional than physical. Sully came to the Bush family after President Bush lost his wife of 73 years earlier this year. Even though he was loved, had family members around and constant Secret Service protection, Bush did not have a companion who gave round the clock unconditional love, support and comfort. I see a lot of men and women in my practice who have service dogs. Because my practice is psychological and not physical, my patients often have issues of depression, anxiety, fearfulness and loneliness. It’s hard to put into words the benefits I see these dogs provide. I have one client who had been attacked and traumatized, and being with her service dog is the only way she can leave her home, be around other people and lead close to a normal life. We had to fight with her apartment owners to get the dog approved but once that challenge was met, she now drives her car, goes to the store, even socializes with friends — all with the dog by her side. So many of the people I see who have been attacked and traumatized become reclusive, isolated and give up. Too often their lives are punctuated by omnipresent fears, both real and imagined, that prevent venturing out of their homes. Through no fault of their own these men and women are revictimized by memories that haunt them. When they bring their dogs into our counseling sessions, the animals sit at their feet, almost always touching or within touching distance. It is this connectedness, warmth and touch that my patients say enable them to feel safe, less alone and more hopeful. Like many service dogs, Sully was trained by prison inmates through the prison puppy project. It’s a win-win for the dogs as well as the men and women. Both get to feel useful, less alone and of tremendous value to others. Mitchell Rosen is a licensed therapist with practices in Corona and Temecula. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
14 Dec 18
Daily Bulletin
Like most Americans, I was saddened to hear of the passing of President George Herbert Walker Bush. Among the iconic images recently was the picture of President Bush lying in state at the Capitol with his service dog, Sully, in front of the casket. The 2-year-old Labrador retriever was loaned to President Bush by America’s VetDogs, a nonprofit that trains and places service dogs with veterans like Bush, a pilot during World War II. I say loaned because now that Sully’s mission is complete, he will return to VetDogs to be placed with another veteran. I wondered what a service dog could do for a man confined to a motorized wheelchair and was surprised to read that Sully opened and closed doors and was able to support President Bush when standing. Perhaps the most important service he provided however was more emotional than physical. Sully came to the Bush family after President Bush lost his wife of 73 years earlier this year. Even though he was loved, had family members around and constant Secret Service protection, Bush did not have a companion who gave round the clock unconditional love, support and comfort. I see a lot of men and women in my practice who have service dogs. Because my practice is psychological and not physical, my patients often have issues of depression, anxiety, fearfulness and loneliness. It’s hard to put into words the benefits I see these dogs provide. I have one client who had been attacked and traumatized, and being with her service dog is the only way she can leave her home, be around other people and lead close to a normal life. We had to fight with her apartment owners to get the dog approved but once that challenge was met, she now drives her car, goes to the store, even socializes with friends — all with the dog by her side. So many of the people I see who have been attacked and traumatized become reclusive, isolated and give up. Too often their lives are punctuated by omnipresent fears, both real and imagined, that prevent venturing out of their homes. Through no fault of their own these men and women are revictimized by memories that haunt them. When they bring their dogs into our counseling sessions, the animals sit at their feet, almost always touching or within touching distance. It is this connectedness, warmth and touch that my patients say enable them to feel safe, less alone and more hopeful. Like many service dogs, Sully was trained by prison inmates through the prison puppy project. It’s a win-win for the dogs as well as the men and women. Both get to feel useful, less alone and of tremendous value to others. Mitchell Rosen is a licensed therapist with practices in Corona and Temecula. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
14 Dec 18
SCNG
Like most Americans, I was saddened to hear of the passing of President George Herbert Walker Bush. Among the iconic images recently was the picture of President Bush lying in state at the Capitol with his service dog, Sully, in front of the casket. The 2-year-old Labrador retriever was loaned to President Bush by America’s VetDogs, a nonprofit that trains and places service dogs with veterans like Bush, a pilot during World War II. I say loaned because now that Sully’s mission is complete, he will return to VetDogs to be placed with another veteran. I wondered what a service dog could do for a man confined to a motorized wheelchair and was surprised to read that Sully opened and closed doors and was able to support President Bush when standing. Perhaps the most important service he provided however was more emotional than physical. Sully came to the Bush family after President Bush lost his wife of 73 years earlier this year. Even though he was loved, had family members around and constant Secret Service protection, Bush did not have a companion who gave round the clock unconditional love, support and comfort. I see a lot of men and women in my practice who have service dogs. Because my practice is psychological and not physical, my patients often have issues of depression, anxiety, fearfulness and loneliness. It’s hard to put into words the benefits I see these dogs provide. I have one client who had been attacked and traumatized, and being with her service dog is the only way she can leave her home, be around other people and lead close to a normal life. We had to fight with her apartment owners to get the dog approved but once that challenge was met, she now drives her car, goes to the store, even socializes with friends — all with the dog by her side. So many of the people I see who have been attacked and traumatized become reclusive, isolated and give up. Too often their lives are punctuated by omnipresent fears, both real and imagined, that prevent venturing out of their homes. Through no fault of their own these men and women are revictimized by memories that haunt them. When they bring their dogs into our counseling sessions, the animals sit at their feet, almost always touching or within touching distance. It is this connectedness, warmth and touch that my patients say enable them to feel safe, less alone and more hopeful. Like many service dogs, Sully was trained by prison inmates through the prison puppy project. It’s a win-win for the dogs as well as the men and women. Both get to feel useful, less alone and of tremendous value to others. Mitchell Rosen is a licensed therapist with practices in Corona and Temecula. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]
14 Dec 18
Russia News Now

What a difference living long enough can make to a man’s reputation! When George Herbert Walker Bush stepped down as the 41st President of the United States, he was despised – and grossly under-rated – by American liberals and conservatives alike. When he died on November 30, full of years and honors, the outpouring of affection, […]