Gonzaga

25 Mar 19
The Denver Post
Chalk one up for the seeded favorite in the NCAA Tournament. The biggest upset this March isn’t a wild heave at the horn for a winner from a No. 15 seed or a First Four team somehow weaving into the second weekend — it’s the lack of genuine stunners to shake up the bracket. The top seeds are still at the top of the tourney. The field has the top three seeds in each round in the Sweet 16 for only the second time (2009) since the bracket expanded in 1985. It’s tied with 2009 for the most top four seeds (14) in the Sweet 16. RELATED: March Madness 2019: Printable second-chance bracket for the NCAA men’s basketball tournament Sure, Virginia had to sweat out another tourney opener. And Duke was a tip-in away from being done. But it’s rare this many single-digit teams still have a shot at cutting down the nets. Think that’s improbable? Consider this, the NCAA bracket tracker says one perfect bracket remains across all major online bracket games, including Yahoo, ESPN, CBS, Fox, Sports Illustrated and the NCAA’s own contest. It’s the longest streak of correct bracket picks, breaking the reported record of 39 games, which happened in 2017. The NCAA says the odds of a perfect bracket are 1 in 9.2 quintillion — so bettors, take the under. Just imagine if the entrant named “Center Road” in the NCAA’s bracket challenge had bet the house on a 48-team money line parlay! For any fan who has a shot at entering one of those second-chance pools, take note: “Center Road” has Duke, Michigan State, Gonzaga, Michigan, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Kentucky as the Elite Eight. Oh, and if you believe “Center Road” knows more than Dickie V or Sir Charles, roll the dice on Gonzaga to beat Kentucky in the national championship game. Cinderella will take a rain check to this party, please. The favorites don’t mind if the trend continues for another week. “Everyone is talking about a Final Four, but I’ve never been to a Sweet 16,” Virginia guard Ty Jerome said. The Big 12 has kept the conference from perfection. No. 4 seed Kansas State was surprised by UC Irvine (well, a surprise for everyone but “Center Road”) and No. 4 seed Kansas was knocked out by fifth-seeded Auburn, which was actually favored by sportsbooks over the Jayhawks. While not among the top 16 seeds, sixth-seeded Villanova also lost, guaranteeing a new national champion will be crowned in Minneapolis. — The 1s: Duke, Virginia, UNC, Gonzaga. — The 2s: Michigan State, Michigan, Tennessee, Kentucky. — The 3s: LSU, Texas Tech, Purdue and Houston. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] — The 4s: FSU and Virginia Tech. When the betting favorite wins, gamblers call it going chalk, an old-school slang term still common in an era where pools are now nearly ubiquitous. It might have to be bought in bulk for a tournament where the 12th-seeded Oregon Ducks are the only double-digit seed in the Sweet 16. The casinos surely could have used a few more upsets to keep the sportsbook a winner. If you’re a fan hooked in March because of the upstart teams from conferences no one has really heard of knocking off the blue bloods while pandemonium ensues, try back next year. But for fans who want the best teams still alive and playing for it all, next weekend could be as good as it gets.
25 Mar 19
CollegeBasketballTalk

These are the lines and totals you’ll be able to bet.

25 Mar 19
Parlay Game

TULSA, Okla – And then there were sixteen. After a whirlwind of first four days of 2019 NCAA Tournament, the peloton was halved with each of the first two rounds and only teams with the chance to win twice. The sweet 16. We saw a little bit of everything during the first frenetic days. Ja […]

25 Mar 19
The Undefeated
As you cheer for your favorite team during March Madness, roar for the entire women’s field as it dribbles deftly up the floor and prances proudly across the stage at commencement. Whatever remains of the so-called “student-athlete” model in big-time college sports is hugely due to them. So exemplary are their graduation rates, they represent one of the best examples of near racial equality in American education. In my 23rd year of charting graduation rates of football bowl teams and basketball tournament teams, formerly for The Boston Globe and now for The Undefeated, women basketball players had one of their best years, with a 92 percent Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for the 64-team field. Excellence was across the board, as African-American and white players graduated at respective rates of 88 percent and 96 percent. [boxout id=”162638″] There were 31 teams with a perfect 100 percent graduation rate for black women. The roll call of perfection comprises Maine, UConn, DePaul, Radford, Rice, Quinnipiac, Buffalo, Belmont, Stanford, Bucknell, Abilene Christian, BYU, Missouri, Drake, South Dakota, Central Florida, Marquette, Texas A&M, Michigan, Kansas State, Gonzaga, UCLA, Maryland, Rutgers, South Carolina, Kentucky, Florida Gulf Coast, Portland State, Mercer, Florida State and Iowa State. That does not yet compare with the total of 49 schools in the tournament that have 100 percent rates for white women players. In the world of small quibbles, if graduation rates were put in terms of traditional numerical academic grades, white women would be a solid A while black women would be a B-plus. Close, but more improvement must still be had before full equality can be declared. But it remains a major victory that 49 of the 61 schools (four out of five) that have data for black women have a graduation rate of 80 percent or higher, including all four top women’s seeds: Baylor, Mississippi State, Notre Dame and Louisville. As good as women’s rates have always been, their programs clearly keep pushing for even better academic performance. A decade ago in my 2009 report, the overall women’s GSR was 84 percent, with black women averaging 78 percent. Back then, the number of schools with 100 percent GSRs for black women was 18 instead of this year’s 31. At the pinnacle of all this is 11-time national champion Connecticut. Despite the fact that UConn’s women proved vulnerable on the court, securing only a No. 2 seed this year, the Huskies remain invulnerable in the classroom. They posted a 100 percent team graduation rate for the fifth straight year. It was the 13th straight season of graduation rates of 90 percent or higher. The women have achieved this level of academic achievement despite now playing the same number of games as men. Most women’s teams in the tournament played between 31 and 33 games, while most men’s teams played between 32 and 34. Men’s teams improve, but more work needed The men’s teams offer a different picture, checkered to the degree that it makes me reach back to 1787 and the United States Constitutional Convention’s horrid “three-fifths compromise.” That agreement allowed slave states to fractionally count chattel to disproportionately boost representation in Congress. There are modern versions of the three-fifths compromise infecting the men’s version of March Madness. While 59 of the 64 women’s teams (92 percent) had overall graduation rates of at least 80 percent, the men managed to get just 40 of 68 teams (three-fifths) to that mark. Of the 55 women’s teams where black and white graduation rates could be compared, only 10 had white rates at least 20 percentage points higher than for black players. [newsletter-culture] Twenty-eight men’s teams, nearly three times more teams than women, had such gaps. That signals the continuing exploitation of black male players. To be clear, public pressure (along with the occasional embarrassing scandal) has forced many schools to devote legitimate time and resources into educating them. For years, my guiding principle has been that teams with graduation rates under 50 percent should be banned from postseason play, a sanction recommended nearly two decades ago by the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics and slowly adopted by the NCAA. Additionally, I’ve long advocated that teams that may have overall graduation rates of at least 50 percent should still be banned if their black rate is under 50 percent. Many programs have historically hit 50 percent by obscuring the appalling grad rates for black players with astronomical rates for white players. The NCAA thus far has refused to consider racial disparities in its criteria for sanctions. Because of scrutiny and scandal, we have come a good distance away from my 2010 report, in which Kentucky, Maryland, Texas, UNLV and Cal had GSRs for black male players ranging from 0 to 22 percent, and my 2009 report, where five teams posted a 0 graduation rate and nearly half the field was under 50 percent for black men. This year, there was only one team, Abilene Christian, with a black GSR under 50 percent in the 68-team field and only two, Abilene Christian and Oregon, with overall graduation rates under 50 percent. In significant good news, there were a record number of teams, 33, with black GSRs of at least 80 percent. That included 20 teams at 100 percent, including top seeds Virginia, Duke and Gonzaga. No. 2 seeds Michigan, Michigan State and Tennessee also had black graduation rates of 100 percent. In many prior years, all three of those latter schools were top offenders. In my 2011 report, their black GSRs ranged from 33 percent to 38 percent. By the way, many fans and alumni constantly ask me if these rates account for players who go pro before their senior year. They do. The NCAA designed the GSR to positively count transfers who graduate within six years while not penalizing programs for players who leave early, as long as they were in good academic standing. However, in the more shadowy corners of the NCAA, the three-fifths compromise lurks. Of the 55 teams that recorded data for white players, 43 had a perfect 100 percent GSR, more than double the number of teams with perfect marks for black players, and close to the level of perfection for white women players. The biggest gap was Abilene Christian’s 46 percentage points: 29 percent for black players and 75 percent for white players. Other schools where the white GSR was at least 33 percentage points higher than the black GSR were North Carolina, Auburn, Kentucky, Maryland, Oklahoma, Ohio State, Northern Kentucky, Buffalo, Central Florida, Minnesota, Texas Tech, Syracuse and Mississippi State. Only five of 55 schools reporting data for white players had graduation rates under 70 percent, and 23 of the 68 teams had black graduation rates under 70 percent, obviously graduating only two-thirds, three-fifths or one-half of their players. While the men play on in echoes of 1787, the women play as if the Equal Rights Amendment, never actually adopted by Congress, is in full force.
25 Mar 19
East Bay Times
No. 2 Stanford vs. No. 7 BYU When: 8 p.m. Monday Where: Maples Pavilion TV: ESPN2 Audio: GoStanford.com Live statistics: NCAA.com Stanford update: The Cardinal (29-4) is trying to reach the Sweet 16 for the 12th consecutive year after racing past UC Davis to open the tournament.  … Stanford lost to Gonzaga, a team BYU defeated three times to win the regular-season and West Coast Conference tournament titles. The Cougars and Stanford lost to Pac-12 opponents Cal and Utah, though the Cardinal defeated the Golden Bears twice after that loss. … Stanford suffered its worst defeat under Hall of Fame coach Tara VanDerveer on Feb. 10 when falling to then-No. 3 Oregon 88-48. The team has won 10 in a row since the humiliating defeat, including defeating the Ducks for the Pac-12 tournament title. … Senior All-American Alanna Smith has joined basketball greats Maya Moore, Breanna Stewart and Elena Delle Donne as the only players in the past 20 years with 1,600 points, 200 blocked shots and 150 made 3-pointers. … Smith on BYU: “It’s a matter of defending the perimeter as well as the paint. It’s difficult to do both, but it’s possible.” … VanDerveer won’t hesitate to use any of her first 10 players. But Stanford relies heavily on guard Kiana Williams, forward DiJonai Williams and Smith. … VanDerveer on BYU’s 6-foot-7 center Sara Hamson: “She blocks a lot of shots, she changes things in the paint when you go in there. I’m glad that we have played against teams that are that big already this year. She scores, they run a lot of really nice pick-and-roll action with her. That’s a big part of their game.” BYU update: The Cougars (26-6) held Auburn to 32 percent shooting from the floor including 4 of 27 from 3-point range in advancing past the No. 10-seeded Tigers in the first round. … BYU is led by three guards: freshman Shaylee Gonzales, sophomore Paisley Johnson and junior Brenna Chase. “We push the ball,” coach Jeff Judkins said. “We take outside shots if we have it. If we don’t we get to the basket either through triple penetration or passing. We don’t really use the post as much as we have in the past where we just padded inside. So it’s more of screening, rolling with our bigs.”  … But the Cougars also have sophomore center Sara Hamson, whose mother Tressa Spaulding was one of BYU’s greatest players. Her older sister, Jennifer Hamson, played in the WNBA and now plays volleyball professionally in Germany. … The Cougars didn’t practice Sunday following the tradition of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints of not competing on the Sabbath. Johnson said it won’t put BYU at a disadvantage. “I thought it was lovely that we could come and bring the spiritual side of our school to the tournament with us,” she said. “And maybe we weren’t able to prepare on the court, but we’ve been preparing all season and just preparing with God to bring the excitement and the game tomorrow.” … Judkins on Gonzales: “You get a point guard like Shaylee Gonzales, who is a special, special player. And coaches dream of having a player that. When I saw her in 8th grade coming to the BYU basketball camp, I knew that girl was going to be good. And she’s surprised me a lot. She’s surprised me because of her poise, her feel for the game.” … Judkins on Stanford: “They’re running the same stuff they ran in December, they’re just running it better right now than they did then.”
25 Mar 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
No. 2 Stanford vs. No. 7 BYU When: 8 p.m. Monday Where: Maples Pavilion TV: ESPN2 Audio: GoStanford.com Live statistics: NCAA.com Stanford update: The Cardinal (29-4) is trying to reach the Sweet 16 for the 12th consecutive year after racing past UC Davis to open the tournament.  … Stanford lost to Gonzaga, a team BYU defeated three times to win the regular-season and West Coast Conference tournament titles. The Cougars and Stanford lost to Pac-12 opponents Cal and Utah, though the Cardinal defeated the Golden Bears twice after that loss. … Stanford suffered its worst defeat under Hall of Fame coach Tara VanDerveer on Feb. 10 when falling to then-No. 3 Oregon 88-48. The team has won 10 in a row since the humiliating defeat, including defeating the Ducks for the Pac-12 tournament title. … Senior All-American Alanna Smith has joined basketball greats Maya Moore, Breanna Stewart and Elena Delle Donne as the only players in the past 20 years with 1,600 points, 200 blocked shots and 150 made 3-pointers. … Smith on BYU: “It’s a matter of defending the perimeter as well as the paint. It’s difficult to do both, but it’s possible.” … VanDerveer won’t hesitate to use any of her first 10 players. But Stanford relies heavily on guard Kiana Williams, forward DiJonai Williams and Smith. … VanDerveer on BYU’s 6-foot-7 center Sara Hamson: “She blocks a lot of shots, she changes things in the paint when you go in there. I’m glad that we have played against teams that are that big already this year. She scores, they run a lot of really nice pick-and-roll action with her. That’s a big part of their game.” BYU update: The Cougars (26-6) held Auburn to 32 percent shooting from the floor including 4 of 27 from 3-point range in advancing past the No. 10-seeded Tigers in the first round. … BYU is led by three guards: freshman Shaylee Gonzales, sophomore Paisley Johnson and junior Brenna Chase. “We push the ball,” coach Jeff Judkins said. “We take outside shots if we have it. If we don’t we get to the basket either through triple penetration or passing. We don’t really use the post as much as we have in the past where we just padded inside. So it’s more of screening, rolling with our bigs.”  … But the Cougars also have sophomore center Sara Hamson, whose mother Tressa Spaulding was one of BYU’s greatest players. Her older sister, Jennifer Hamson, played in the WNBA and now plays volleyball professionally in Germany. … The Cougars didn’t practice Sunday following the tradition of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints of not competing on the Sabbath. Johnson said it won’t put BYU at a disadvantage. “I thought it was lovely that we could come and bring the spiritual side of our school to the tournament with us,” she said. “And maybe we weren’t able to prepare on the court, but we’ve been preparing all season and just preparing with God to bring the excitement and the game tomorrow.” … Judkins on Gonzales: “You get a point guard like Shaylee Gonzales, who is a special, special player. And coaches dream of having a player that. When I saw her in 8th grade coming to the BYU basketball camp, I knew that girl was going to be good. And she’s surprised me a lot. She’s surprised me because of her poise, her feel for the game.” … Judkins on Stanford: “They’re running the same stuff they ran in December, they’re just running it better right now than they did then.”
25 Mar 19
The Mercury News
No. 2 Stanford vs. No. 7 BYU When: 8 p.m. Monday Where: Maples Pavilion TV: ESPN2 Audio: GoStanford.com Live statistics: NCAA.com Stanford update: The Cardinal (29-4) is trying to reach the Sweet 16 for the 12th consecutive year after racing past UC Davis to open the tournament.  … Stanford lost to Gonzaga, a team BYU defeated three times to win the regular-season and West Coast Conference tournament titles. The Cougars and Stanford lost to Pac-12 opponents Cal and Utah, though the Cardinal defeated the Golden Bears twice after that loss. … Stanford suffered its worst defeat under Hall of Fame coach Tara VanDerveer on Feb. 10 when falling to then-No. 3 Oregon 88-48. The team has won 10 in a row since the humiliating defeat, including defeating the Ducks for the Pac-12 tournament title. … Senior All-American Alanna Smith has joined basketball greats Maya Moore, Breanna Stewart and Elena Delle Donne as the only players in the past 20 years with 1,600 points, 200 blocked shots and 150 made 3-pointers. … Smith on BYU: “It’s a matter of defending the perimeter as well as the paint. It’s difficult to do both, but it’s possible.” … VanDerveer won’t hesitate to use any of her first 10 players. But Stanford relies heavily on guard Kiana Williams, forward DiJonai Williams and Smith. … VanDerveer on BYU’s 6-foot-7 center Sara Hamson: “She blocks a lot of shots, she changes things in the paint when you go in there. I’m glad that we have played against teams that are that big already this year. She scores, they run a lot of really nice pick-and-roll action with her. That’s a big part of their game.” BYU update: The Cougars (26-6) held Auburn to 32 percent shooting from the floor including 4 of 27 from 3-point range in advancing past the No. 10-seeded Tigers in the first round. … BYU is led by three guards: freshman Shaylee Gonzales, sophomore Paisley Johnson and junior Brenna Chase. “We push the ball,” coach Jeff Judkins said. “We take outside shots if we have it. If we don’t we get to the basket either through triple penetration or passing. We don’t really use the post as much as we have in the past where we just padded inside. So it’s more of screening, rolling with our bigs.”  … But the Cougars also have sophomore center Sara Hamson, whose mother Tressa Spaulding was one of BYU’s greatest players. Her older sister, Jennifer Hamson, played in the WNBA and now plays volleyball professionally in Germany. … The Cougars didn’t practice Sunday following the tradition of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints of not competing on the Sabbath. Johnson said it won’t put BYU at a disadvantage. “I thought it was lovely that we could come and bring the spiritual side of our school to the tournament with us,” she said. “And maybe we weren’t able to prepare on the court, but we’ve been preparing all season and just preparing with God to bring the excitement and the game tomorrow.” … Judkins on Gonzales: “You get a point guard like Shaylee Gonzales, who is a special, special player. And coaches dream of having a player that. When I saw her in 8th grade coming to the BYU basketball camp, I knew that girl was going to be good. And she’s surprised me a lot. She’s surprised me because of her poise, her feel for the game.” … Judkins on Stanford: “They’re running the same stuff they ran in December, they’re just running it better right now than they did then.”
25 Mar 19
Lonzo Wire

After a wild opening weekend of NCAA Tournament play, the NBA Draft has already seen a shakeup with Ja Morant securing the No. 2 spot

25 Mar 19
FiveThirtyEight
You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the numbers tucked inside the news. 22 months After 22 months of subpoenas, indictments and relative silence, special counsel Bob Mueller handed in his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election to the Department of Justice Friday. On Sunday, Attorney General Bob Barr told Congress that Russia did try to influence the election, but that Mueller’s team “did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities.” On the question of whether President Trump obstructed justice, Barr’s letter said, “While the report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” [FiveThirtyEight] 11 percent During last week’s live show of FiveThirtyEight’s politics podcast, the mention of Pete Buttigieg’s name got by far the loudest ovation of all the Democratic presidential candidates. And yesterday, Emerson released a poll showing that Buttigieg is on the rise among likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa. Could it be a Buttigieg boomlet? Or could it be that it’s easy to see a trend when you combine an anecdote and a 249-person sample? Probably the latter! Only 315 days to go until votes are cast. [Emerson] 2 teams After a weekend of March Madness in the men’s NCAA basketball tournament, 16 teams remain. Only two of them come from outside the sport’s power conferences, and one of those is a No. 1 seed (Gonzaga). Each region’s top three seeds advanced. [Washington Post] $70 million Director Jordan Peele has figured out how to make Americans pay to be critiqued. First, his 2017 horror movie “Get Out” made $176 million domestically, in part because of its searing take on race relations. His follow-up, “Us,” made $70 million at the box office this weekend while indicting Americans for their tendency to … well, actually, I’m not sure. I was too scared to add my own $15 to that tally. [BoxOfficeMojo] 9.9 yards per target Rob Gronkowski, the court jester of the NFL, announced his retirement from football Sunday after a nine-year career. Despite being a tight end, Gronk was one of the best receivers of all time while playing for the New England Patriots. He gained 9.9 yards per every time he was targeted by a quarterback, more than any other player since 1992. [FiveThirtyEight] 2.3 million disaster survivors A government inspector general found that the Federal Emergency Management Agency inadvertently shared the personal information of 2.3 million disaster survivors with a housing contractor. The survivors gave the information to FEMA as part of its program that finds hotels for people after disaster strikes. [BuzzFeed News] Love digits? Find even more in FiveThirtyEight’s book of math and logic puzzles, “The Riddler.” If you see a significant digit in the wild, please send it to @ollie, not me. [newsletter-sigdigs]
25 Mar 19
Gonzaga High School

A number of our students did a fantastic job representing Gonzaga this weekend at the Skills Canada Competition. Several students captured awards at the end of the competition. Ally Wragg won gold in Photography. Ally will represent Newfoundland and Labrador at Skills Canada in Halifax this May. Bethany Drover and Alex Green won bronze in […]

25 Mar 19
Bonesville: The Authoritative Independent Voice of East Carolina

Gilbert contacts WBB coaching candidates…Pirates complete sweep over UCF with 6-5 win…ECU SB Drops Series Finale At Memphis…Three-Star Nasir Clerk Is The First Commit of the Mike Houston Era…Five ECU basketball players enter transfer portal…Houston moves into Sweet 16 for first time in 35 years…‘We end in tears’: Johnny Dawkins and UCF teaches his grateful […]

25 Mar 19
Turtleboy

  The first two rounds of March “Madness” are in the books, and we have our first official winner free Turtleboy gear: Congrats to Jason Judice. Email us at turtleboysports@gmail.com or send a message on Facebook to TBNews. David Laclair led the entire weekend until Oregon beat UC Irvine in the final game. That was […]

25 Mar 19
College Sports, Lifestyle, Breaking News & Videos | Campus Sports

We are 48 games into the 2019 NCAA Tournament and the Sweet 16 is set. Incredibly, for the first time ever in March Madness history, there is one perfect bracket remaining after opening weekend. NCAA.com tracks millions of brackets and one named “Center Road” on the Bracket Challenge Game is 48-of-48. The previous record for […]

25 Mar 19
Avant-Garde Togolaise et Africaine Peuples Observateurs

Doria Sachs 3/12/2019 0 Comments Goldman Sachs is being overseen by the Doria and Sacchetti banking families of Italy. Their combined names translated from Italian mean Gold Sachs. The Doria name derives from de Auria and Aureo or D’oro which are Italian words for gold. The Doria family started out as a banking family from […]

25 Mar 19
Avant-Garde Togolaise et Africaine Peuples Observateurs

Armed Guard of Hollywood The Pallavicini family are the primary owners of the Armenian Mafia or Armenian Power which are headquartered in Hollywood and operate as enforcers, extortionists, human traffickers, and security. The Pallavicini family are ancient Palhavi or Iranian royalty and the Pahlavuni family are also Iranian royalty that settled in Armenia which evolved […]

25 Mar 19
Portland's Daily Drip

Good morning, Spring Breakers, and to all ye who toil and labor instead. It’s a cloudy Monday in Portland, March 25, 2019, and how can we tell it’s Spring Break in Oregon? The National Weather Service posts this: “SYNOPSIS…Weather turns cooler and wetter starting Monday as an upper-level trough settles over the northeastern Pacific and […]