Green Book

26 May 19
Watts Up With That?

Republished from The Conversation under CC license. James Dyke, University of Exeter The coffee tasted bad. Acrid and with a sweet, sickly smell. The sort of coffee that results from overfilling the filter machine and then leaving the brew to stew on the hot plate for several hours. The sort of coffee I would drink […]

26 May 19
Literary Wanders

This is a horrible book. In the best possible way. It is hard to talk about this book without spoiling the ending, so I don’t have much to say about it, especially of intellectual value. I will say this: John Green had me crying for the last 80 pages straight. It took me a while […]

26 May 19
THE VALLEY NERD WATCH

We were just told about the Western MA Living Adventure Game Club! “Living Adventure Games are immersive, participatory programs that inspire kids to experience a setting and interact with that setting first-hand. This format gives kids agency over certain aspects of the game and encourages a deeper level of learning, understanding, and skills practice because […]

26 May 19
WritersBlock84

Sometimes a good pen can help with the writing process. As for me, I am not the kind of writer that can write a book on a computer. I need my trusty notebook and my pen and write out my story or an outline. I am the type of nerd that color coordinates my notes […]

26 May 19
Times-Standard
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
The Reporter
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
Chico Enterprise-Record
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
Oroville Mercury-Register
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
Red Bluff Daily News
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
Daily Democrat
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
Paradise Post
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
East Bay Times
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud.* * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
The Mercury News
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=warriors-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] OAKLAND – Unlike what he experienced for most of his first two NBA seasons, Jordan Bell currently does not have to wonder about his role. The Warriors might still have uncertainty on whether Kevin Durant (right calf) or DeMarcus Cousins (left quadricep muscle) will play against the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday. The Warriors do not have uncertainty, though, on whether the 24-year-old Bell will spend most of his time on the floor or on the bench. “He’s going to play,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’ll see how it all shakes out. It depends on match-ups, health and the rest. But even if everybody is healthy, Jordan will find his way on to the court. He’s earned that.” Kerr did not always feel that way about Bell after the Warriors paid the Chicago Bulls about $3.5 million for the rights to select him at No. 38 in the 2017 NBA Draft. Bell spent his rookie season juggling initial excitement over his dunking and athleticism, while improving his fundamentals and preparation. Both parties expected Bell to improve during his second season. He struggled to receive a definitive role amid a bloated frontcourt, mixed results with his emerging jump shot and frustration with his on-court consistency. The Warriors also suspended Bell for one-game after charging a purchased candle to the hotel bill of assistant coach Mike Brown nearly two months ago in Memphis. “It’s been tough this year. I was taking basketball too seriously. For me, it was life or death,” Bell said. “If it wasn’t going good, nothing else in my life was going good. If it was going great, everything else in my life was going great. I just have to find that balance of understanding what basketball is, controlling the ball and not letting the ball control me.” Bell said it only took two days for all parties “to move on” from his hotel bill incident. It took much longer for Bell to overcome his season-long frustration, though. Bell normally loves the Christmas holiday for all the obvious reasons, but he described it as “being sucky this year” because of his evolving role as a backup forward. With Draymond Green, DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney, Jonas Jerebko and Andrew Bogut competing for front-court minutes, Bell statistically regressed from his rookie season to his second year in points (4.6, 3.3), shooting percentage (62.7 percent, 51.6 percent) and playing time (14.2 minutes, 11.6). And Bell admittedly harbored concerns on what that would mean when he becomes a restricted free agent in July. Klay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up! “I found other things to keep my mind off it. I can’t think if I’m not playing, I’m going to be mad all day,” Bell said. “Things are now going well with basketball, obviously. So if things are going well, they’re going well. If not, you have to find something else to give you peace of mind.” Bell said he began changing his mindset about 1 ½ months ago. Even if practice time did not guarantee minutes, Bell treated those sessions as his escape from frustrations with his evolving role. He often took walks to nearby parks either by himself or with his dogs. And when Bell played unexpectedly, the Warriors became encouraged that he tried hard with hustle instead of trying hard with showcasing his game. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] After fielding a combined five healthy scratches in the Warriors’ playoff series against the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets, Bell became one of several bench players to help in the team’s decisive Game 6 against the Rockets to compensate for Durant’s absence. Then, Bell had four points, two rebounds and two blocks in 11 minutes. He followed that up by averaging six points and 2.25 rebounds in 13.5 minutes per game in the Warriors’ sweep over the Portland Trail Blazers in the Western Conference Finals. “He’s playing at a really high level now, giving us exactly what we need,” said Kerr, citing Bell’s speed, energy, athleticism, decision making and passing. “He’s been fantastic. I’m really happy for him because it was a tough regular season for him. But he’s finishing the season well, and I think this bodes well for his future.” Even when Bell’s future appeared uncertain, he sensed some of this coming. Although he described his rookie season as “a little different,” Bell’s playoff role had also gradually increased. Kerr liked Bell’s hustle when he appeared in the final 35.6 seconds of the first half of an eventual Game 3 loss to New Orleans in the Western Conference semifinals. So after averaging 6.0 minutes during that series, Kerr elevated Bell’s role in the Western Conference Finals against Houston (14.2 minutes) and the NBA Finals against Cleveland (13.5 minutes) because of how matched up with both teams’ small-ball oriented lineups. It appears Bell has that same trajectory in this current postseason. “I knew what was going to happen,” Bell said. “I’m not saying I knew the KD injury was going to happen. But for me, I knew a circumstance would happen where I knew my name would be called. I didn’t want it to come that way. But things have a way of working themselves out.” And now that it has, both parties seem intrigued and exciting about the partnership. “He’s played his way into that, and he’s helped us win games,” Kerr said of Bell. “So I’m really confident putting him out there.” WARRIORS HQ PODCAST: Be sure to visit our podcast page at mercurynews.com. You can also get notified of new episodes on iTunes, Google Play Music, Spotify, Stitcher and SoundCloud. * * * Follow Bay Area News Group Warriors beat writer Mark Medina on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
26 May 19
Gifts N Days

Memorial Day Memorial Day is a federal holiday that is celebrated on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day is a holiday that honors veterans. Memorial Day weekend is a holiday weekend when many stores have Memorial Day sales. People put flowers on graves for Memorial Day. Memorial Day has a 2 Gifty rating on […]

26 May 19
Blog

When pressure or blockage, it is wise to make a change so that we don't stay there. However, many times we forget some simple things we can do for ourselves, bringing our inspiration back and increasing our creativity quickly and easily. If you often enter the first draft, please write it by hand. Nothing compares…

20 ways to keep writing inspiration and creativity was originally published on China

26 May 19
Shenandoah Valley's Civil War

And men will tell their children, Tho’ all other memories fade, How they fought with Stonewall Jackson In the old Stonewall Brigade.” A tiny clutch of Civil War veterans, “dressed in faded and tattered gray uniforms, white whiskers” gathered in Lexington, Virginia on July 20, 1891. It was one day shy of the thirtieth anniversary […]