Greenham Common

17 Jun 19
Stories and Pictures

I want to write about tidiness and chaosness. More about chaosness than tidiness. I know chaosness is not yet a word, but it attempts to describe what I want to write about today. It is about disorder, about allowing, about being with what is. I have ten dwarf kale plants in pots in the garden […]

14 Jun 19
CityLife: Stories Against Loneliness

From the life of Sarah Bancroft By Erica Masserano — Sarah says she’s late because she saw a seal in the Thames. “It was like an arrow in the water”, she mimes, swimming around the room in broad strokes; it’s Kate Bush interpretive dance meets your local fisherman measuring a fictional catch with his arm. […]

13 Jun 19
The Scottish Sun
BBC newsreader George Alagiah has revealed that he’s once again undergoing treatment for bowel cancer. The broadcaster will still be presenting BBC News at Six but may have to reduce his appearances over the coming weeks. George Alagiah has revealed that he’s undergoing treatment for bowel cancer again George had 17 rounds of chemo back in 2014 to treat advanced bowel cancer. The following year, he turned to his news reading duties. Last January, he revealed that the cancer had returned. Having presented on the channel for over ten years, he returned to the BBC newsroom this January for the first time since December 2017. His agent, Mary Greenham said: “George Alagiah will aim to be on air as much as possible, but may need to reduce his workload in the next few weeks as he begins a new regime of treatment to deal with a recent recurrence of his cancer. George returned to the BBC newsroom earlier this year and intends to do as much as he can while he has treatment “He is always grateful to the public for the tremendous support he has received.” Back in April, George spoke of how much harder he was finding having the disease a second time. “I found it harder the second time,” he told the podcast In Conversation With George Alagiah. “To be told it had come back was quite tough.” But he said that recovery was a lot easier knowing that he was surrounded by his loving friends and family. “It’s easier for us as patients then it is for those around us,” he went on. “I’ve limited my life right down to 24 hours ahead, ‘Can I do what I need tomorrow? Yes I can.’ “Whereas for my wife and our sons, they are looking ahead, they’ve got their own lives to lead. “But they also feel that they have to care for me and be sensitive to my needs as well.” Bowel cancer is the UK’s forth most common cancer, killing 16,000 a year. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of bowel cancer”]IF it’s caught early, bowel cancer is very treatable, and has a good survival rate. Those diagnosed at stage one – the earliest stage – have a 97 per cent chance of surviving for five years or more. That plummets to just seven per cent if you’re diagnosed at stage four, when the cancer has spread. A key to early diagnosis is knowing the signs to watch out for. The red-flag signs that mean you could have bowel cancer are: bleeding from your bottom and/or blood in your poo a persistant and unexplained change in your bowel habits unexplained weight loss extreme tiredness for no obvious reason a pain or lump in your tummy Most people with these symptoms won’t have bowel cancer, BUT if you have one or more of these signs it’s vital to see your GP to get checked over. In some cases, a tumour in the bowel can cause an obstruction, blocking digestive waste from passing through the bowel. Symptoms of a bowel obstruction can include: intermittent, and occasionally severe, abdominal pain – this is always provoked by eating unintentional weight loss – with persistent abdominal pain constant swelling of the tummy – with abdominal pain vomiting – with constant abdominal swelling A bowel obstruction is a medical emergency. If you suspect your bowel is obstructed, you should see your GP quickly. If this isn’t possible, go to A&E. [/boxout] The Sri Lankan-born presenter said in March of 2018 that a different screening service, available in Scotland, could have detected his cancer sooner and aided his treatment. In Scotland, people are automatically screened for the disease from the age of 50. In England, they used to get the test only from the age of 60 – something that The Sun vigorously campaigned to change. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON BOWEL CANCER” term_id=”10757″ posts_number=”12″ /] Thanks to our No Time 2 Lose campaign, the government agreed to lower the English screening age to match Scotland’s – but is yet to set it into practice. George isn’t the only newsreader to find out that he’s living with an aggressive form of bowel cancer. The BBC’s Middle Eastern correspondent Jeremy Bowen revealed back in April that he was undergoing bowel cancer treatment after having surgery to remove a tumour. [bc_video video_id=”6031379360001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Jeremy Bowen ​did not have typical symptoms before getting his bowel cancer diagnosis”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours        
13 Jun 19
The Irish Sun
BBC newsreader George Alagiah has revealed that he’s once again undergoing treatment for bowel cancer. The broadcaster will still be presenting BBC News at Six but may have to reduce his appearances over the coming weeks. George Alagiah has revealed that he’s undergoing treatment for bowel cancer again George had 17 rounds of chemo back in 2014 to treat advanced bowel cancer. The following year, he turned to his news reading duties. Last January, he revealed that the cancer had returned. Having presented on the channel for over ten years, he returned to the BBC newsroom this January for the first time since December 2017. His agent, Mary Greenham said: “George Alagiah will aim to be on air as much as possible, but may need to reduce his workload in the next few weeks as he begins a new regime of treatment to deal with a recent recurrence of his cancer. George returned to the BBC newsroom earlier this year and intends to do as much as he can while he has treatment “He is always grateful to the public for the tremendous support he has received.” Back in April, George spoke of how much harder he was finding having the disease a second time. “I found it harder the second time,” he told the podcast In Conversation With George Alagiah. “To be told it had come back was quite tough.” But he said that recovery was a lot easier knowing that he was surrounded by his loving friends and family. “It’s easier for us as patients then it is for those around us,” he went on. “I’ve limited my life right down to 24 hours ahead, ‘Can I do what I need tomorrow? Yes I can.’ “Whereas for my wife and our sons, they are looking ahead, they’ve got their own lives to lead. “But they also feel that they have to care for me and be sensitive to my needs as well.” Bowel cancer is the UK’s forth most common cancer, killing 16,000 a year. [boxout headline=”Symptoms of bowel cancer”]IF it’s caught early, bowel cancer is very treatable, and has a good survival rate. Those diagnosed at stage one – the earliest stage – have a 97 per cent chance of surviving for five years or more. That plummets to just seven per cent if you’re diagnosed at stage four, when the cancer has spread. A key to early diagnosis is knowing the signs to watch out for. The red-flag signs that mean you could have bowel cancer are: bleeding from your bottom and/or blood in your poo a persistant and unexplained change in your bowel habits unexplained weight loss extreme tiredness for no obvious reason a pain or lump in your tummy Most people with these symptoms won’t have bowel cancer, BUT if you have one or more of these signs it’s vital to see your GP to get checked over. In some cases, a tumour in the bowel can cause an obstruction, blocking digestive waste from passing through the bowel. Symptoms of a bowel obstruction can include: intermittent, and occasionally severe, abdominal pain – this is always provoked by eating unintentional weight loss – with persistent abdominal pain constant swelling of the tummy – with abdominal pain vomiting – with constant abdominal swelling A bowel obstruction is a medical emergency. If you suspect your bowel is obstructed, you should see your GP quickly. If this isn’t possible, go to A&E. [/boxout] The Sri Lankan-born presenter said in March of 2018 that a different screening service, available in Scotland, could have detected his cancer sooner and aided his treatment. In Scotland, people are automatically screened for the disease from the age of 50. In England, they used to get the test only from the age of 60 – something that The Sun vigorously campaigned to change. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON BOWEL CANCER” term_id=”10757″ posts_number=”12″ /] Thanks to our No Time 2 Lose campaign, the government agreed to lower the English screening age to match Scotland’s – but is yet to set it into practice. George isn’t the only newsreader to find out that he’s living with an aggressive form of bowel cancer. The BBC’s Middle Eastern correspondent Jeremy Bowen revealed back in April that he was undergoing bowel cancer treatment after having surgery to remove a tumour. [bc_video video_id=”6031379360001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Jeremy Bowen ​did not have typical symptoms before getting his bowel cancer diagnosis”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours        
13 Jun 19
Archy news nety

BBC journalist George Alagiah has revealed that he is once against the treatment of bowel cancer. The issuer will still present BBC News at six, but may have to reduce its appearances in the coming weeks. 2 George Alagiah has revealed that he is once again undergoing treatment for bowel cancer In 2014, George had […]

13 Jun 19
News Archives Uk

BBC newsreader George Alagiah wants to undergo more treatment to deal with a recent recurrence of cancer. The broadcaster, 63, wants to stay on BBC News At Six as much as he can, but may need to reduce his appearances over the coming weeks. Alagiah underwent 17 rounds of chemotherapy to treat advanced bowel cancer […]

10 Jun 19
News Archives Uk

Troy Kennedy Martins daughter Sophie told The Big Issue why she wants to read the original script It has been voted the UK's biggest film of all time and celebrates its 50th anniversary this month. But for Troy Kennedy Martin – the man as the writer of The Italian job The comedy about the conspiracy […]

06 Jun 19
Tribute to Veterans

Almighty God: Our sons and the pride of our Nation this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity. Lead them straight and true; give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith. And […]

06 Jun 19

The landscape we celebrate as unsullied and ripe with mystique is a living, working, and occasionally rancorous environment – not an unaffected idyll – that forged a nation’s musical personality, and its dissenting traditions. On a chronological journey that takes him from postwar poets and artists to the late twentieth century and the free party […]

05 Jun 19
Hogrider Dookes

Five years ago I published this post. Much has happened since then and for various reasons, not least the 75th Anniversary of D-Day, I have decided to re-post it in a slightly edited form. I do hope that you enjoy it and spare a moment to remember those who gave so much for freedom. When […]