Grinch

25 May 19
Mother Jones
In 2005, George Lucas was about to release Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith, which is technically the sixth film in the series, and according to 60 Minutes—with whom Lucas sat down for a broad retrospective—”The Last Star Wars.” He was ready to move on. “There is no episode seven,” Lucas says confidently. Instead, he pines for failure making tiny art films. “I don’t think everything should be these big, blown-out super kind of movie that I stumbled into,” Lucas says. “I’ve sort of followed it to the end.” In fact, it was barely the beginning of the “big, blown-out super kind of movie.” It wasn’t even the end for the Star Wars franchise—which has continued to make millions 42 years after its debut in theatres. In 2008, Marvel Studios released Iron Man, kicking off the Marvel cinematic universe. Films, studios had realized, could be connected in a vast web of money-making spinoffs, sequels (and sequels to sequels), TV shows, merchandise, theme parks, novels, comic books, and really anything that can bear a likeness or a logo. A perfectly fine, middling comedy—ahem, Ant-Man and the Wasp—now was a superhero movie too; you’ve got to see it to follow along! Entertainment morphed into an obsessive hobby, and people spend a lot of money on hobbies. Marvel’s universe-building strategy crystalized what the money was already saying: A movie was valuable because it established a brand. Adapting comic book storytelling to the big screen offered a natural way to cash that check. One that Star Wars foresaw but originally failed to fully seize. Other movie franchises felt the monetary effects of zealous fandom. The Harry Potter films made $7.7 billion at the box office and an estimated $15 billion from merchandising; Hasbro became a $14 billion behemoth because of Transformers; in 1996, Mattell lost $300 million because of a Buzz Lightyear toy “famine” just before Christmas—more than Toy Story grossed at the box office. We now live in a world of universes. Of the top ten grossing movies from 2018, only one wasn’t an expansion of an already created brand, assuming that The Grinch isn’t a building block in an upcoming Dr. Seuss cinematic tower of content. There’s also intellectual property like Angry Birds, a game that was transformed into a movie in hopes it would be a universe—only to find the solar systems of some cultural touchstones aren’t able to support content life. Even a prestige TV show like Big Little Lies needs to feed the beast.  But first, there was Star Wars. “The deeper you go, there’ll be more things to reward you,” said Marvel Studios’ Kevin Feige, the mastermind behind this capitalism-forward way of storytelling. “And I learned that directly from Star Wars.” Feige says he read Star Wars novels as a kid. The series inspired ravenous fandom from the beginning. The Washington Post described a neighborhood wrecked in 1977 because it was the only one with a theatre playing Star Wars: “It’s … it’s an invasion,” said one resident, as if Godzilla was stomping around her borough. Toys created by Kenner for the film flew off the shelves. By the end of 1978, the company sold more 40 million action figures, generating more than $100 million in sales. But the true turning point was 1980, the year The Empire Strikes Back was released, when merchandising began to outpace ticket sales. By 2012, the Hollywood Reporter estimated that Lucas had built a $20 billion toy empire; his films made a little above $3 billion in tickets sales. And, decades later, kids are still buying a ton of Star Wars branded materials. “All the money’s in the action figures,” Lucas famously said.   [inline_image id=”attachment_753774″ align=”none” width=”990″][figcap][credit]LMPC / Getty[/credit][/figcap][/inline_image]Lucas often hedges this massive enterprise as all in service of the movies. He told Rolling Stone in the 1970s he was going to use profits to build what became the Skywalker Ranch in Northern California, to get away from the Hollywood muck, an idyllic place to make those experimental art films. We’ve never seen evidence of such projects; instead, the Skywalker Ranch is a big business production studio, one campus of four owned by Lucasfilms that employs more than 2,000 employees who are famous for their computer-generated imagery. (Michael Bay was inspired to create his films after a summer job there.)  Despite the finality in Lucas’ words in 2005,  there was an episode seven. After Disney acquired Lucasfilm for $4 billion in 2012, the companies needed to churn out content. Now, J.J. Abrams is finishing up the last film in the new trilogy, to be released in late 2019; there are at least two Star Wars shows set to premiere on Disney’s new streaming service; the Game of Thrones creators are going to create yet another trilogy of movies, the first set for a 2022 release; and Rian Johnson is also creating a spinoff trilogy. All of these will be accompanied by comic book and novel tie-ins, of course, and plenty of merchandise. Truly, the cherry on top here is a new theme park, Galaxy’s Edge, to open its doors on May 31 and sell $200 lightsabers and $100 droids to the cash-positive fandom. “And if the people at the Walt Disney Company…have anything to say about it,” wrote Adam Rogers in Wired when Disney unveiled the full post-merger plans, “the past four decades of Star Wars were merely prologue.” Rogers dubbed it “the forever franchise.” In many ways, Star Wars was catching up to its own lessons. In 2015, George Lucas sat down for another sprawling retrospective interview, this time with Charlie Rose. Rose tells him that Steven Spielberg said that Star Wars’ release changed everything in the movie business. He asks if he’s proud. “Well it changed for the good and the bad,” Lucas responds. “The studios realized they could make a lot of money: ‘This is a license to kill.’ And they did it…That’s the downside of Star Wars.” Lucas seems to feel this personally. While A.O. Scott has described the birth of universe filmmaking as akin to a “workplace sitcom”—a never-ending story with our friends—Lucas sounds trapped. “It was a while before I realized that I’m never going to get out,” he said to Rose. “I’m always going to be George ‘Star Wars’ Lucas. No matter how hard I try to be something else.”  In some ways, we as viewers are in the same Sisyphean position. The totality of these spaces stretches far beyond films. If you buy cereal or purchase suit or go to Burger King: there is a Star Wars version of that. They’re called universes and not worlds for a reason. Like Luke, we can escape one planet—for Skywalker, to recuperate and train with Yoda; for us, by avoiding Rogue One—but we can never jettison the totality of Star Wars. We’re destined to fulfill its cosmic laws, like how all heroes replay the same story—or see the same movie—over and over. “Yes,” Lucas confirmed after a bit of prodding in that 60 Minutes interview, “it ends in hell.”
25 May 19
Archy news nety

You need to watch a lot of good movies in the next week or two, because in June Netflix is ​​losing Apollo 13, 101 Dalmatians, Friday 13, I Am Legend, both Kill BillS, Legally Blonde, Pretty in Pink, Stargate, The Constant Gardener, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Apocalypse Now, District 9, is The pianist. […]

25 May 19
Predul98Grav South Dakota

BDRip Dual Áudio + Torrent 720p e 1080p Sinopse: Ferdinando é um touro com um temperamento calmo e tranquilo, que prefere sentar-se embaixo de uma árvore e relaxar The Grinch Download PC Game Cracked in Direct Link and Torrent. The Grinch is a platform video game based on the film of the same name.CRACKED – […]

24 May 19
AFROINSIDER

A visit to the beach Tamar Braxton recently made with boyfriend David Adefeso got frisky and resulted in a hilarious response from the singer’s young son. After 5-year-old Logan graduated from kindergarten last week, Braxton took him and her main squeeze to the beach Thursday. Appearing to be enjoying how she looked in her swimsuit […]

24 May 19
What's on Netflix

The Secret Life of Pets 2 is now out in the cinemas but also should be arriving on Netflix in many regions over the coming years. Below, we’re going to take a look at what the streaming plans for The Secret Life of Pets 2 and when the movie will be on Netflix.  The sequel […]

24 May 19
Nana to Mom

I can tell you for certain that the Big C Word – Cancer is definitely a fear in my world. My aunt, my dad and my brother all passed away from cancer. But the Big C Word I am referring to today is CHANGE! I have cried over it, I have felt depression because of […]

24 May 19
The Vintage Hippie

Good Morning Lovely People- It’s still raining here in Kansas- but thankfully no Tornados today so far… We had one hit a little too close to home this week — like- literally in this picture from my back deck you can see a tornado touched down in a town 15 miles away (look just left […]

24 May 19
The Spiritual Garden

There’s been a lot going on recently. Both in my personal life, and outside in the big wide world. It can make a witch pause and take stock of the important things in her life. Recently, I’ve felt a bit of a slump in my spirituality- not necessarily a crisis, but something very similar. We […]

24 May 19
RUDI

Scrivendo del remake di Psycho, ho ricordato i 7 Oscar per il miglior trucco assegnati a Rick Baker; 11 le nominations; solo sette persone hanno ricevuto più statuette. 1982 – Oscar per An American Werewolf in London 1985 – Nomination per Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes 1988 – Oscar per Harry […]

24 May 19
The Undefeated
Monday 05.20.19 Former Los Angeles Lakers president of basketball operations Magic Johnson, who was objectively bad at his job and who admitted to not giving his full attention to his job and who publicly quit his job without telling his boss, put most of the blame for the team’s disastrous season on the “backstabbing” Rob Pelinka, the team’s general manager. The Indianapolis Colts, who, based on their owner, believe in third and fourth (and fifth and sixth and …) chances, signed former Denver Broncos quarterback Chad Kelly, last seen being arrested for illegally trespassing in a couple’s home. Cleveland Browns head coach Freddie Kitchens, who definitely was considering the “person” when his team signed the 2017 rushing champion, said he wanted embattled running back Kareem Hunt to feel “supported as a person” when Kitchens attended Hunt’s recent baptism. Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott, the inspiration behind Bokeem Woodbine’s Can’t Get Right in Life, was briefly detained at a Las Vegas music festival for pushing an event staff member. Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, putting the “con” in “contrition,” said he “genuinely” feels bad about publicly criticizing former teammate Antonio Brown after a game last season. Tuesday 05.21.19 Former Buffalo Bills running back O.J. Simpson, really burying the lede on “too much else,” said he doesn’t mind new Bills running back Senorise Perry wearing his iconic No. 32 jersey because “it’s not something I think about. There’s too much else going on in life.” Former UFC lightweight champion Conor McGregor, taking the Confederacy approach to handling monumental losses, said “this war is not over” in reference to his ongoing feud with current lightweight champion Khabib Nurmagomedov, who beat McGregor in October. Defensive lineman Ndamukong Suh signed a one-year contract with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who hope the only stomping the former Defensive Player of the Year does next season is of highly contagious forms of bacteria. New Orleans Pelicans executive vice president of basketball operations David Griffin, like a stepfather trying to warm up to his new stepson, said he is “confident that we can create — and are creating — the right environment” for star forward Anthony Davis to remain with the team. [newsletter-twtw] Wednesday 05.22.19 The former European agent for Milwaukee Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo, who has clearly never listened to Scorpion, said he has “Never seen anything as disrespectful as this before” in reference to Toronto rapper Drake’s courtside seat behavior during Toronto Raptors home playoff games. Kansas City Chiefs safety Tyrann Mathieu, who, unlike the honey badger, might want to actually “give a s—,” was the victim of a $5 million extortion plot by a family member. Colts tight end Eric Ebron, inexplicably cutting something he enjoys out of his life in hopes of sparking extraordinary change like a muscled Alyssa Milano, said he stopped eating honey buns in an effort to break Rob Gronkowski’s tight end touchdown record. The NFL, which coincidentally is still in the middle of a billion-dollar concussion settlement, has asked teams to phase out the use of the Oklahoma drill, which saw players run full speed at one another in limited space. Thursday 05.23.19 Former competitive cyclist Lance Armstrong, putting the “PSI” in “psychotic,” said he “wouldn’t change a thing” about his doping history because “We did what we had to do to win.” Golden State Warriors forward Kevin Durant is “unlikely” to play at the beginning of next week’s NBA Finals after suffering a calf strain, prompting a rare, Grinch-like smile on the face of an anonymous, rotund Warriors teammate. New York Jets head coach Adam Gase, who would never inexplicably trade away a Pro Bowl running back, said it’s “ridiculous” to posit that he’d trade Jets running back Le’Veon Bell this season despite, in the same interview, not denying that he disagreed with the $52.5 million contract Bell was given in March.
24 May 19
Archy news nety

Let's remember the old days, let's say 2015 when Tyler, the creator announced a kind of gathering, there would be a line around the street, screaming fans (as usual) and a very rare sighting of security. Today in 2019, Tyler announces a meeting after a four-year ban from the UK and there's a crowd full […]

24 May 19
Madison Liddell

It’s that time of the year again. The celebration of my birthday. The actual worst time of the year from me. Despite the grinch-like sentiment, I can’t remember the last time I looked forward to this day. Memories are filled with childhood anticipation, parties that ended in tears and – as I grew up – […]