Haymon Boxing

24 Jun 19
THE FIGHT JOURNAL

  Former Super Welterweight Champion Jermell Charlo Scores Spectacular Knockout Victory over Dangerous Jorge Cota in Main Event of PBC on FOX Fight Night at Mandalay Bay Event Center   Sensational Super Welterweight Prospect Joey Spencer Pounds Out Unanimous Decision over Rugged Aleem Black in Co-Feature   Former World Champion Guillermo Rigondeaux Stuns Julio Ceja […]

24 Jun 19
Villainfy Media

LAS VEGAS (June 23, 2019) – Former super welterweight world champion Jermell Charlo had anticipated this night would be all about him returning to championship glory. But it wasn’t to be. Charlo accomplished something just as sweet – a picture perfect knockout victory over dangerous veteran Jorge Cota in the main event of PBC on FOX Fight […]

24 Jun 19

Nababahala umano ang beteranong boxing promoter na si Bob Arum na baka magkaroon ng brain damage si Manny Pacquiao sa pagharap niya kay WBA welterweight champion Keith Thurman sa Las Vegas sa susunod na buwan. Ayon sa 87-anyos na Top Rank CEO, ang edad na ng fighting senator na 41-anyos ay malayo na ang performance […]

22 Jun 19
talkSPORT
Joe Joyce has all the tools to become a world heavyweight champion, no question about it. At just over 6ft 5in with a wealth of amateur pedigree that includes numerous medals, he has all the attributes and experience necessary to create some noise at the top of the division. Joyce is 9-0 (9 KOs) and a rising star of the heavyweight division after a stellar amateur career With nine fights and nine wins via KO to his name, Joyce has now signed with Frank Warren to try and get the big fights he needs to get into the title reckoning. His first step towards that goal will come in the shape of Bryant Jennings at the O2 Arena on July 13 on a card that features fellow heavyweight stablemates Daniel Dubois and Nathan Gorman going at it. However, it was a far from conventional start for Joyce in boxing. He was a relatively late bloomer by all accounts. talkSPORT caught up with the Juggernaut to learn more about the Olympic silver medallist. “I got into boxing roughly aged 22,” Joyce started. “I went down to my local gym and spoke to a trainer who said I should start going to a keep-fit class on Wednesdays and then after a while, he asked me to come back for the boxing sessions on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. “So I did that alongside the keep-fit class during the summer off university and when I went back to uni, I did an exchange over in America. I carried on doing fine art there and when I came back, I did my dissertation at Middlesex Uni and instead of going to my graduation, I already had flights booked to China. So I went to China and I was doing Shaolin kung fu in a Shaolin gym. But then after all of that, I finally came home and decided to really knuckle down on the boxing. [article-rail-section title=”LATEST BOXING NEWS” posts_category=”217″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”recent” /] “I got to a level where I was boxing at the under 20’s novice ABAs – I won that. I had a friend who was training me since I was 18 to do athletics and he was from Cuba, Juan Hernandez Pinada, a hurdler, who told me I should go to Cuba because that is like the cradle of boxing. “So I went and stayed with his brother for three weeks and after that I entered the main ABAs and won that with the skills I had picked up. I then fought in the GB tournament and managed to get selected following a trial and went on to win various medals at different tournaments, won Commonwealth gold and I was able to stay on until Rio where I picked up silver.” Joyce has all you could wish for, but this is far from a lifelong odyssey for the 33-year-old. His interest in boxing only really began when he realised he was quite good at it. “I was never into boxing. I’m not really into boxing now, but I enjoy doing it. As far as heroes go, I didn’t really have any but everyone has heard about Muhammad Ali and he was kind of my mainstream hero anyway,” Joyce explained. “It wasn’t until I got into boxing properly that I started looking at other boxers. Like I learned about Teofilo Stevenson out in Cuba, Joe Louis, then to modern day like Floyd Mayweather, Gennady Golovkin and Vasyl Lomachenko – all highly skilled.” Joyce lands a sickening left hook to Joe Hanks As an athletic guy, Joyce had the attributes and size to be decent in any field he set his mind to. Still, only choosing to don the gloves aged 22 meant he didn’t get into the pro game until he was 32. He’s 34 in September. As a result, he can’t afford to have the patience his stablemates Dubois and Gorman could have if they wanted to. Joyce has got the guts to go for broke. “I played every sport going as a kid. I was good at most, but didn’t excel at anything until I started boxing. I’m not taking 10-20 learning fights. I’m more jumping in at the deep end, getting the fights that are progressing me in the rankings and getting good names on my record. I’m not doing a Lomachenko with a title shot in my debut fight or anything like that but he had over 300 amateur fights and I have decent pedigree, too.” Next up is former world heavyweight title challenger Bryant Jennings in what will surely be Joyce’s toughest test to date, and that’s not lost on the London-born star. Joe Joyce won the last of Team GB’s 67 Olympic medals when he took silver in the super heavyweight boxing “I know about Bryant Jennings. I’m still looking at his stuff, but he’s only lost to Luis Ortiz, Wladimir Klitschko and Oscar Rivas, the latter of which was a close one. So there all good names and it’s going to be a close one, just depends who is the better man on the night.” Joyce started his career being promoted by former heavyweight world champion David Haye and had a pitstop with American Al Haymon before finding his way to Frank Warren. Joyce explained the reasoning for teaming up with the legendary British promoter lies in his ambition. Joe Joyce teaming up with Frank Warren’s Queensbury Promotions “I’m with Frank Warren to get in the ring with the biggest names possible and get where I need to be. I want to get to a world title. Hopefully, before the end of this year or the beginning of the next year, I’ll hold a version of a world title. That’s my aim. “Facing the winner of Gorman and Dubois is an option, it’s a big option. If the money is right I would definitely consider it. It’s a big fight. But, being mandatory for the European title and WBA (regular) belt, those are the titles that I want. I’ve got good options.”
17 Jun 19
News Archives Uk

In the past week, veteran promoter Bob Arum expressed his concerns that eighth division champion Manny Pacquiao could enter the ring against WBA welterweight champion Keith Thurman at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas on July 20th. Pacquiao, who turns 41 in December, will face one of his most dangerous opponents in years with Thurman, […]

17 Jun 19
News Directory

Why do you start your own business from the start when you can take a check and buy another? I think that UFC President Dana White was not left with the option of ZUFFA – now owned by Ari Emanuel and Endeavor – 100% entering boxing, with only a big fat production. for the past […]

15 Jun 19
FightPost: MMA & Boxing News

Cuba: The Present & The Future  By Rachel Aylett This is the first in a regular series of articles where I will focus on the professional scene in various countries. I could think of no more interesting place to start with than Cuba. Of course, as Cuban boxers have been forbidden to turn professional at […]

13 Jun 19

UFC President Dana White has talking about getting into the boxing business for years. Yet so far, he’s made no headway on that mission. At least not publicly. That could soon change. According to The Athletic’s Mike Coppinger, UFC parent company Endeavor and its CEO Ari Emanuel could soon be buying Premier Boxing Champions (PBC), […]

13 Jun 19
Breaking News, Entertainment, Sports & College Life | COED

Endeavor, the parent company of the Ultimate Fighting Championship, is reportedly in talks to make a big move in the boxing world. According to the latest buzz, Endeavor is moving to purchase Premier Boxing Champions which is currently run by Al Haymon. The news was first reported by The Athletic’s Mike Coppinger. “Rumors are true,” […]

13 Jun 19
Daily Republic

Jun. 13–LAS VEGAS — On Dec. 1, in the 12th round, Deontay Wilder knocked Tyson Fury into Dec. 2. He clubbed Fury with a right hand. On Fury’s way down, Wilder added a left-handed wrecking ball. Wilder drew his thumb across his throat and went to a neutral corner. He could have gone to a […]

13 Jun 19
Archy news nety

Dana White is announcing his intentions to get into the boxing business. I could make nothing happened, but that could soon change in a major way. The Athletic's Mike Coppinger revealed in a Q&A that there is a lot of truth to the rumors that Endeavor, the UFC's parent company, are looking to buy Al […]

13 Jun 19
The Irish Sun
TYSON FURY claims Deontay Wilder is not “man enough” to face him after the Bronze Bomber had to “rob him in America” to avoid defeat last year. The Gypsy King returned from a two and a half year lay-off last year to face Wilder after only beating unheralded Sefer Seferi and Francesco Pianeta in tune-up bouts. Tyson Fury claims Deontay Wilder is not ‘man enough’ to face him after he had to ‘rob him’ in America last year Fury, 30, was desperately unlucky not to walk away world champion in December, largely outboxing WBC champ Wilder, 33, despite the Brit twice being floored. The pair are now signed to rematch next year, but Fury told BBC Sport the Alabama puncher cannot bare to look at him after he had to “‘rob” him in December. Fury said: “In the time I was off he had seven title defences. I’ve studied boxing my whole life, the worst thing a fighter can be isn’t fat, isn’t unconditioned, it’s not match-fit, inactive. “I’ve gone in there inactive, had two easy fights in the last three years and done that to him – he caught me twice in a 12-round fight. “What has he really got? If I was a match fit fighter and a world champion and had seven title defences and some fat man comes off drugs and alcohol and lost 10-stone and done that to me I’d never look at the sport again. [quote credit=”Fury on Wilder “]Can you imagine if I had been in this game five-years, lived in the gym, never ate a McDonalds and had a body on me like anything and some fat fella has come out of retirement and busted me and I’ve had to rob him in America to get a decision.[/quote] “Truth of the matter is I couldn’t be at my best and I still beat him at nowhere near my best – he knows it and I know it. “He isn’t man enough to speak to me or even face me any more. He used to text me back and forth. I’ve text him five times and he hasn’t replied once. “Because he can’t, how can he look at me and say ‘Oh yeah, I thought I won that fight’. Because he knows he didn’t.” After Fury dethroned Wladimir Klitschko of the unified titles in November 2015 a battle with depression, drugs and alcohol caused the 6ft 9in giant to lose his belts and almost his life. But after meeting trainer Ben Davison, and finding inspiration to get back on his feet, the pair made a comeback plan with their relationship blossoming. Fury, who faces Tom Schwarz on Saturday, was an outsider going into his WBC title fight against knockout artist Wilder last year due to his inactivity out of the ring. And the former unified champion revealed he had to “con” Wilder and promoter Al Haymon into thinking he only took on the challenge in order to get “a few quid”. Fury said: “Does Deontay Wilder have anything to bother me? Nothing at all, as I wouldn’t have taken him after being out of the ring for three-years would I? “I’ve been hurt 1,000 times but Wilder didn’t hurt me once. He hit me in the back of the head, scrambled my senses and the last knockdown was a touch of sleep but didn’t hurt me. “Those same punches that caught me then are not going to catch me when I’m match fit, at all. [article-rail-section title=”Most Read in Boxing ” posts_category=”16″ posts_number=”8″ query_type=”popular” /] “They was banking on me not being half the man as I was when I beat Klitschko and that was why they took the fight. “I had to sort of con Al Haymon into that I was coming back for a payday, and I was going to be easy to beat and I had no motivation and I only wanted a few quid. “And when I was bouncing in front of Deontay Wilder he was thinking ‘This man isn’t coming for a pay day, you told me he was coming for a payday fight – what’s going on here!’” Fury ballooned up to 400lbs while on the sidelines before making a successful comeback in 2018 Fury rose to the canvas on two occasions against Wilder before the result was announced as a draw The pair are now set for a rematch early next year back in the US
13 Jun 19
The Scottish Sun
TYSON FURY claims Deontay Wilder is not “man enough” to face him after the Bronze Bomber had to “rob him in America” to avoid defeat last year. The Gypsy King returned from a two and a half year lay-off last year to face Wilder after only beating unheralded Sefer Seferi and Francesco Pianeta in tune-up bouts. Tyson Fury claims Deontay Wilder is not ‘man enough’ to face him after he had to ‘rob him’ in America last year Fury, 30, was desperately unlucky not to walk away world champion in December, largely outboxing WBC champ Wilder, 33, despite the Brit twice being floored. The pair are now signed to rematch next year, but Fury told BBC Sport the Alabama puncher cannot bare to look at him after he had to “‘rob” him in December. Fury said: “In the time I was off he had seven title defences. I’ve studied boxing my whole life, the worst thing a fighter can be isn’t fat, isn’t unconditioned, it’s not match-fit, inactive. “I’ve gone in there inactive, had two easy fights in the last three years and done that to him – he caught me twice in a 12-round fight. “What has he really got? If I was a match fit fighter and a world champion and had seven title defences and some fat man comes off drugs and alcohol and lost 10-stone and done that to me I’d never look at the sport again. [quote credit=”Fury on Wilder “]Can you imagine if I had been in this game five-years, lived in the gym, never ate a McDonalds and had a body on me like anything and some fat fella has come out of retirement and busted me and I’ve had to rob him in America to get a decision.[/quote] “Truth of the matter is I couldn’t be at my best and I still beat him at nowhere near my best – he knows it and I know it. “He isn’t man enough to speak to me or even face me any more. He used to text me back and forth. I’ve text him five times and he hasn’t replied once. “Because he can’t, how can he look at me and say ‘Oh yeah, I thought I won that fight’. Because he knows he didn’t.” After Fury dethroned Wladimir Klitschko of the unified titles in November 2015 a battle with depression, drugs and alcohol caused the 6ft 9in giant to lose his belts and almost his life. But after meeting trainer Ben Davison, and finding inspiration to get back on his feet, the pair made a comeback plan with their relationship blossoming. Fury, who faces Tom Schwarz on Saturday, was an outsider going into his WBC title fight against knockout artist Wilder last year due to his inactivity out of the ring. And the former unified champion revealed he had to “con” Wilder and promoter Al Haymon into thinking he only took on the challenge in order to get “a few quid”. Fury said: “Does Deontay Wilder have anything to bother me? Nothing at all, as I wouldn’t have taken him after being out of the ring for three-years would I? “I’ve been hurt 1,000 times but Wilder didn’t hurt me once. He hit me in the back of the head, scrambled my senses and the last knockdown was a touch of sleep but didn’t hurt me. “Those same punches that caught me then are not going to catch me when I’m match fit, at all. [article-rail-section title=”Most Read in Boxing ” posts_category=”17″ posts_number=”8″ query_type=”popular” /] “They was banking on me not being half the man as I was when I beat Klitschko and that was why they took the fight. “I had to sort of con Al Haymon into that I was coming back for a payday, and I was going to be easy to beat and I had no motivation and I only wanted a few quid. “And when I was bouncing in front of Deontay Wilder he was thinking ‘This man isn’t coming for a pay day, you told me he was coming for a payday fight – what’s going on here!’” Fury ballooned up to 400lbs while on the sidelines before making a successful comeback in 2018 Fury rose to the canvas on two occasions against Wilder before the result was announced as a draw The pair are now set for a rematch early next year back in the US
13 Jun 19
The Sun
TYSON FURY claims Deontay Wilder is not “man enough” to face him after the Bronze Bomber had to “rob him in America” to avoid defeat last year. The Gypsy King returned from a two and a half year lay off last year to face Wilder after only beating unherald Sefer Seferi and Francesco Pianeta as tune up bouts. Tyson Fury claims Deontay Wilder is not ‘man enough’ to face him after he had to ‘rob him’ in America last year Fury, 30, was desperately unlucky not to walk away world champion in December, largely outboxing WBC champ Wilder, 33, despite the Brit twice being floored. The pair are now signed to rematch next year, but Fury told BBC Sport the Alabama puncher cannot bare look at him after he had to “‘rob” him in December. Fury said: “In the time I was off he had seven title defences. I’ve studied boxing my whole life, the worst thing a fighter can be isn’t fat, isn’t unconditioned, it’s not match-fit, inactive. “I’ve gone in there inactive, had two easy fights in the last three-years and done that to him – he caught me twice in a 12-round fight. “What has he really got? If I was a match fit fighter and a world champion and had seven title defences and some fat man comes off drugs and alcohol and lost 10-stone and done that to me I’d never look at the sport again. [quote credit=”Fury on Wilder “]Can you imagine if I had been in this game five-years, lived in the gym, never ate a McDonalds and had a body on me like anything and some fat fella has come out of retirement and busted me and I’ve had to rob him in America to get a decision.[/quote] “Truth of the matter is I couldn’t be at my best and I still beat him at nowhere near my best – he knows it and I know it. “He isn’t man enough to speak to me or even face me anymore. He used to text me back and forth. I’ve text him five times and he hasn’t replied once. “Because he can’t, how can he look at me and say ‘Oh yeah, I thought I won that fight’. Because he knows he didn’t.” After Fury dethroned Wladimir Klitschko of the unified titles in November 2015 a battle with depression, drugs and alcohol caused the 6ft 9in giant to lose his belts and almost his life. But after meeting trainer Ben Davison, and finding inspiration to get back on his feet, the pair made a comeback plan with their relationship blossoming. Fury, who faces Tom Schwarz on Saturday, was an outsider going into his WBC title fight against knockout artist Wilder last year due to his inactivity out of the ring. And the former unified champion revealed he had to “con” Wilder and promoter Al Haymon into thinking he only took on the challenge in order to get “a few quid”. Fury said: “Does Deontay Wilder have anything to bother me? Nothing at all, as I wouldn’t have taken him after being out of the ring for three-years would I? “I’ve been hurt 1,000 times but Wilder didn’t hurt me once. He hit me in the back of the head, scrambled my senses and the last knockdown was a touch of sleep but didn’t hurt me. “Those same punches that caught me then are not going to catch me when I’m match fit, at all. [article-rail-section title=”Most Read in Boxing ” posts_category=”331″ posts_number=”8″ query_type=”popular” /] “They was banking on me not being half the man be half the man as I was when I beat Klitschko and that was why they took the fight. “I had to sort of con Al Haymon into that I was coming back for for a payday, and I was going to be easy to beat and I had no motivation and I only wanted a few quid. “And when I was bouncing in front of Deontay Wilder he was thinking ‘This man isn’t coming for a pay day, you told me he was coming for a payday fight – what’s going on here!’” Fury ballooned up to 400lbs while on the sidelines before making a successful comeback in 2018 Fury rose to the canvas on two occasions against Wilder before the result was announced as a draw The pair are now set for a rematch early next year back in the US
13 Jun 19
Daily News
LAS VEGAS — On Dec. 1, in the 12th round, Deontay Wilder knocked Tyson Fury into Dec. 2. He clubbed Fury with a right hand. On Fury’s way down, Wilder added a left-handed wrecking ball. Wilder drew his thumb across his throat and went to a neutral corner. He could have gone to a corner of Switzerland and he could have come back and Fury would not have moved. Except Fury did. In fact, Fury looked up and blinked, as if ending a hibernation. He stood up and resumed his task of the 11 previous rounds, which consisted of putting two-punch combos on Wilder’s head and moving his own head away. The final bell rang and Fury, at 6-foot-9, climbed up the turnbuckle and bellowed. Later, welterweight Keith Thurman would liken Fury to The Undertaker, the pro wrestler known for feats of resurrection. But wrestling matches don’t go to the judges. This one did, and they gave the heavyweights an unpopular split draw. When interviewed in the ring, Fury only spoke of the glorious battle. “By doing so, he prevented a riot,” said Ben Davison, Fury’s trainer, after Fury worked out for fans in the MGM Grand lobby. “There were thousands of Travelers in the building. There was no doubt in anyone’s mind, or mine, as to who won the fight.” Fury’s people are Irish Travelers, an ethnic group of which 10,000 or so are in America. Tyson’s father, John Sr., was a bare-knuckle fighter before he was a pro boxer. The Travelers, who find recreation in fisticuffs, will be back Saturday night at the MGM Grand when Fury takes on Tom Schwarz, an undefeated German. Since December, Fury’s fame has redoubled. He lost more than 100 pounds, grounded his lifestyle, dealt with depression and thoughts of suicide. He also signed with Top Rank, which puts its fights on ESPN. The market for Fury-Wilder II is so bountiful that Top Rank CEO Bob Arum had little trouble agreeing with Al Haymon, Wilder’s promoter and Arum’s frequent protagonist, to stage it in the spring of 2020. “Fury’s the best one out there,” Arum said. “And he’s in such good shape. He looks like a basketball player now.” Yet Fury’s main memory is that the first fight was not a win. “I was very disappointed,” he said. “I’m still very disappointed. I thought I won that fight.” But how did he get up? Fury leaned in conspiratorially. “What really happened was, I heard the voice of Muhammad Ali in my ear,” he said. “Get up, champ!” The closest eyewitness was Jack Reiss, the referee. When Fury crashed, Reiss was standing near his feet. “He’s barrel-chested, so I couldn’t see his face until I got over there,” Reiss said. “I had to send Wilder to his corner and I had to pick up the count from the timekeeper. By then the count was three. But Fury’s eyes were open. “He was grimacing. Then he got up at nine.” Before the fight, Reiss tells the fighters, “If you’re down, you have to tell me you’re OK. You have to nod your head so the commission and the fans can see it.” Here, Fury put his hands on Reiss’ shoulders, and Reiss knocked them away. Fury answered Reiss’ questions correctly, and Reiss asked him to move left and move right. Fury did that. “I was 150 percent certain that he could go ahead,” Reiss said. He was vindicated when Fury took over the rest of the 12th, and Wilder was the one who seemed to need assistance. “The fight did more for him mentally than anything else,” said Davison, 26. “He’s been very open about his mental issues. The first two fights, there still were some things there, but for the Wilder fight, he had the tunnel vision that you need. Mentally comfortable and balanced, those are probably the right words.” [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Fury, coming off a two-year suspension, was well north of 400 pounds when he and Davison drove 30 hours to Marbella, Spain two years ago. Secluded, Fury parlayed a low-carb, high-fat keto diet and 11 training sessions per week to rearrange the body and mind that confronted Wilder. You see Fury now but mostly you hear him, hear the exuberance of a man in the midst of what he enjoys. “No, I don’t enjoy fighting,” Fury said. “How can you enjoy fighting another man? I’d rather be sitting at home and taking my kids to school.” But didn’t he say he loved the game? “Of course I love it. I love my wife, too, but sometimes I hate her. It’s the same with boxing.” Never doubt a man when you’ve seen him come to his senses.