Hensel

15 Dec 18
otter83tree

, 2008). Activation from the phage shock reply check details has been witnessed within number of complex organic circumstances of possible value within bacterial virulence, including excitedly pushing motility, biofilm creation, account activation associated with variety III release, epithelial cell attack as well as bacterial internalization by macrophages (Darwin as well as Burns, The late […]

15 Dec 18
Chico Enterprise-Record
Saturday services Oroville Foothill Community Church, Free Methodist: 2475 Foothill Blvd.: Preview service with Pastor Phil Gilmore, 6 p.m.  533-0912, http://www.foothillchurch.com. Seventh-day Adventist Church: 1180 Robinson St.: 10:45 a.m. Pastor Larry Kostenko. 533-4461. Yankee Hill Golden Feather Seventh-day Adventist Church: 3861 Detlow Road, quarter-mile off Highway 70: 9:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday services Berry Creek Berry Creek Community Church: 1461 Bald Rock Road: 11 a.m. Pastor Robert Staton. Nondenominational Mountain Chapel Assembly of God: 66 Rockefeller Road off Bald Rock Road: 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Pastor Phil and Marlen Hillier. 589-4655. Whispering Pines Chapel: 60 Whispering Chapel Lane, behind Berry Creek Post Office: 11 a.m. Pastor Brad Long. Interdenominational. Bangor Bangor Community Church: 7419 Oro-Bangor Hwy.: 10 a.m. Pastor Bruce Chikalla, Theologically conservative, Bible-believing church affiliated with pastoral leadership from Village Missions. (www.village-missions.org). Oroville Baha’i Faith: 1-2 p.m. Casual service of prayer and devotion with readings from all faiths. 534-7674. Calvary Baptist Church: 2377 Foothill Blvd.: Sunday School and Adult Bible Study, 9:30 a.m. Worship services, 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Family Night, 6:30 p.m. Biblical preaching and teaching, Christ-honoring music. Pastor Doug Taylor. Nursery provided. 533-7320. Calvary Chapel: 3723 Ashley Ave.: 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Children’s ministry during service. Pastor Bob Scott. 533-1535. Calvary Christian Fellowship: 3855 Fallbrook: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Worship services, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.  Wednesday worship, 7 p.m. Pastors Mark and Jeanette Hicks. 533-3750. Calvary Evangelical Lutheran Church: LCMS, Foothill Boulevard and Edgewood Drive: Worship service, 9 a.m. Children’s church for 10 and younger during worship.  533-5017. Center for Spiritual Living: 3135 Oro Dam Blvd.: Worship with message from the Rev. Connie Couser, interim pastor, 10:30 a.m. 589-9719 or spiritoforo@sbcglobal.net. CFC One Voice Oroville Campus Assemblies of God: 1235 Lincoln St.: 9 and 11 a.m. Pastor John Mitchell. http://www.cfconevoice.com. Christian Science: 1940 Bird St., in Reading Room: Church service, 10-11 a.m. Sunday school for up to age 20 same hour. Wednesday Testimony meeting, noon. Reading Room open to public, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. 533-1274. . The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: Services: Oroville 1st Ward, 2390 Monte Vista Ave. 9 a.m.-noon, Bishop Chris Avila, (530) 990-3794. Oroville 3rd Ward, 2390 Monte Vista Ave. 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Bishop Paul Fairbanks, (530) 513-1825. Table Mountain 1st Ward, 167 Table Mountain Blvd. 9 a.m.-noon, Phillip Papa, (530) 503-6592. Table Mountain 2nd Branch, Hmong, 167 Table Mountain Blvd. noon-3 p.m. President Ye Pao Chue, (530) 354-5708. Sacrament meeting, President Vang Choua Chue, 532-0942. Missionary meeting house tours; 403-7406 or 403-7043. Family History Center, 2390 Monte Vista Ave., open to public 2-5 p.m., 6-9 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays. Clean Slate Community Church: 1223 Palermo Road: Worship, 11 a.m. Pastor John Craig. Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Evangelical Free Church: 3785 Olive Hwy.: “Following a Star – Finding a King,” from Pastor Gregg Hensel, 9 a.m. on the third Sunday of Advent. Scripture: Matthew 2. Sr. High Youth Group, 5:30 p.m. in Fellowship Hall; Jr. High Youth Group, 5:30 p.m. in the annex. 533-6866; office@evfreeoroville.com; http://www.evfreeoroville.com. Father’s House Church: 2833 Fort Wayne St.: 10 a.m. Pastor Steve Orsillo. 534-4140. First Baptist Church: 2661 Yard St.: Worship, 11 a.m. Bible based, Christ centered and life related church. 533-6197. First Congregational Church: 1715 Bird St. at Oak Street: “Joy – Justice at Last,” from Pastor Roy Fisher, 9:30 a.m. Scripture: Zephaniah 3:14-20, Luke 3:7-18. The church is a member of the United Church of Christ. 533-2483. First United Methodist: 45 Acacia Ave.: “Rejoice in the Lord Always!” from Pastor Chenge Yang, Hmong speaking service, 8:30 a.m., and English, 10:30 a.m. Scripture: Philippians 4:4-7. Children’s church, 9 a.m. Hmong Adult Sunday school and Youth Fellowship, 10:30 a.m. 534-9455; http://www.1stunitedmethodist.org. Pursuit Christian Church: 2295 Foothill Blvd.: 10 a.m. Pastor Fred Wood. Non-denominational Christian church. 533-4786. Foothill Community Church, Free Methodist: 2475 Foothill Blvd.: 10 a.m. 533-0912, http://www.foothillchurch.com. Full Gospel Church of Tres Vias Road: 2975 Grand Ave.: 10 a.m. and Thursday, 7 p.m. 533-2598. Grace Baptist: 3646 Oro Dam Blvd.: Worship services, 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday school, 9:45 a.m. 533-1456 or http://www.graceoroville.org. Grace Point Church of Oroville: 1619 10th St.: Adult Bible Study, 11 a.m. Worship service, noon. Small groups meet midweek; locations,  times online. Information or free rides, 534-1018 or http://www.orogracepoint.com. New Home Missionary Baptist: 4380 Lower Wyandotte Road: Worship service, 11 a.m. 534-6518. New Hope Missionary Baptist:  5640 Lincoln Blvd.: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Bill DeVore. Afternoon services with Bible study, 1:30 p.m. 533-7692. No. 1 Church of God in Christ: 3291 Burlington Ave.: Service, 3:30 p.m. Olive Hill Missionary Baptist Church: 200 Executive Parkway: “Doing God’s Will,” from Pastor Fred McCarn, 11 a.m. Scripture: 2 Corinthians 1:15-20. 403-0267. Open Door Church, independent Pentecostal Church: 2555 Baldwin Ave.: 9:30 a.m. Bible Study. Worship services, 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Pastor Allan Dikes. 534-3806. Oroville Church of Christ: 625 Bird St.: Bible class, 9:45 a.m. Worship services, 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday: Bible class, 6 p.m. Minister David Dowlen.533-4971. Oroville Church of the Nazarene: 2238 Monte Vista Ave.: 9 and 10:45 a.m. 533-7464; http://www.oronaz.org. River of Life Assembly of God: 3210 Oro Dam Blvd.: Worship with message from Pastor Scott Thomson, 10 a.m. 533-4707. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church: 1430 Pine St.: 10 a.m. Rev. Bill Rontani. Prayer Garden at 1454 Pine St.; walk the Labyrinth. 533-5035 or http://www.stpaulgold.org. St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church: 1330 Bird St.: Masses: Saturday, 5:30 p.m. English and 7 p.m. Spanish; Sunday 8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.; 12:30 p.m. in Challenge; daily Tuesday-Friday 8:30 a.m. in Oroville. Rev. Gerome Hernandez. 533-0262. Taylor Memorial Christian Methodist Episcopal Church: 1957 B St.: Worship with message from the Rev. David Goodson, 11 a.m. The Salvation Army: 1460 Washington Ave.: 11 a.m. Pastors Larry J. and Julie E. Feist. The Table Church: 360 Grand Ave.: Worship with Pastor Jaymes Lackey, 10:45 a.m. http://www.TheTableChurch.net. 871-9985. Trinity Presbyterian Church: 2350 Foothill Blvd.: Worship with message from the Rev. Pam Anderson, 10:15 a.m. http://www.trinityoroville.org. 534-0354. Unity of Oroville: 1321 Robinson St.:   Peace Pole garden, labyrinth and Zen garden open daily to public. orovilleunity@sbcglobal.net. Venture Foursquare Church: 3330 Orange Ave.: Experience the Message and Power of Jesus in the Spirit of Freedom, Hope and Love, from Pastor Jeff Ballard, 10:30 a.m. http://www.ExperienceTheVenture.com. Wynn Memorial C.O.G.I.C.: 2528 D St.: 11 a.m. Pastor Edward E. Hall. Palermo Christian Faith Center: 7695 Melvina Ave.: 10 a.m. classic gospel and 10:30 a.m. contemporary. 532-1215 or http://www.cfcoroville.org. Palermo Baptist Church: 2290 Kenilworth Ave: 11 a.m. Pastor Peter Wooten. 533-8197. Palermo Bible Family Church: 2570 N. Villa Ave.: Services, 9:30 a.m. traditional and 11 a.m. contemporary. Pastor Michael Jacobsen. http://www.michaeljacobsenministries.org, 533-2975. Thermalito New Life Church: 965 Grand Ave.: Worship services,  10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday service, 7 p.m. Pastors Ken and Brenda Malone. 534-6816. Oroville Christian Church: 1154 Plumas Ave.: Bible study, 9 a.m. Worship service, 10 a.m. Pastor Mike Bryan, Thermalito Baptist Church: 1443 10th and Nevada streets: 10 a.m. Communion. Pastor Larry Teal. 534-6795. Biggs United Methodist Church: 441 C Street: Worship service with message from Pastor Julie Raridan, 9 a.m. The deadline for church briefs and services is noon Wednesday prior to publication. Email items to religion@orovillemr.com or fax them to 342-3617. Do not send email attachments.
14 Dec 18
L2S Legal, LLC

Applying Chevron deference, the Fifth Circuit has affirmed OSHA’s controversial Controlling Employer doctrine, which allows OSHA “to issue citations to controlling employers at multi-employer worksites for violations of the Act’s standards,” even if none of the controlling employer’s workers were exposed. Source: Acosta v. Hensel Phelps Construction Company (5th Cir. 11/16/18). 

14 Dec 18
SOMEONE SOMEWHERE

PTSD sometimes spreads from trauma victims to the people who care for them, including rescue workers, spouses and even therapists Psychotherapists need to be empathetic, but they must also retain some emotional distance from their patients to avoid becoming become “infected” by traumatic memories. In Brief When caregivers, rescue workers or family members attend to […]

14 Dec 18
Summerset Computer Club

Presented by Jim Bush, December 13, 2018 Attendees: 17 Jim shared the growing need to understand the importance of many of your user IDs and remember the passwords for them.    

13 Dec 18
Spallation of the Heart

Ability Dictionary.com defines ability: noun, plural a·bil·i·ties. power or capacity to do or act physically, mentally, legally, morally,financially, etc. competence in an activity or occupation because of one’s skill, training, or other qualification: the ability to sing well. abilities,talents; special skills or aptitudes: Composing music is beyond his abilities. A word closely related to ability […]

13 Dec 18
VentureBeat
The narrative goes that in order to really build a successful rocket ship company, Heartland tech companies have to recruit some upper-level talent from other places — namely, Silicon Valley — that have worked for fast-growing startups before. But are companies overemphasizing the need to find talent with prior startup experience? That’s the thesis of Robert Hatta, talent partner at Drive Capital. He thinks the Midwest is sitting on a “mother lode” of untapped startup talent, mostly tucked away in the region’s corporations. He recently created a test that attempts to measure whether a person will be a good fit for startup work, without looking at whether that person has prior startup experience. Hatta said when he joined Drive Capital five years ago, he spent a good portion of his time trying to convince talent to ditch Silicon Valley for the Midwest. “It’s worked, but it’s also a long sales cycle,” Hatta said. “Our companies are no different than those in Silicon Valley. We need the best people in the world to make these companies, and [people] assumed that the best people in the world aren’t here, and we’ve found that not to be true.” Hatta said he realized this belief was misplaced after the CEOs of Columbus’ Root Insurance and Pittsburgh’s Duolingo — the two most valuable companies in Drive Capital’s portfolio — both said that many of their highest-performing employees had never worked at a startup or tech company before. This held true even for more technical roles, like engineers. Hatta wanted to find a way to identify this hidden talent, so he began creating a test that could be used to attract interested talent to Drive’s portfolio companies. The test is 30 minutes long, and Hatta said that interviews are scheduled with participants who get above a certain score. He stresses that it’s not a “scientifically rigorous experiment” and said he won’t be publishing his results in an academic journal. He developed the test with the help of a friend who holds a PhD in psychology and human behavior. Hatta said he doesn’t want to share too much about the test, as he doesn’t want people to try to game the results. But he added that, generally speaking, some of the core attributes of high performers identified by Root and Duolingo include the ability to learn quickly and to constantly redeploy themselves when faced with a new problem or dataset. In the roughly one month since he posted the test online, Hatta said that about 75 people have taken it, and he’s started to schedule initial meetings with the high performers. I think that a test like this is a good first attempt to widen the Heartland recruiting lens. Area workers who are curious but hesitant about applying for jobs because they don’t know much about startup culture gain a low-effort way to test the waters. The risk comes in taking the results of a test like this as canon — will some people who score poorly be discouraged from applying for startup jobs altogether? And, as with any test, there’s the risk that it may be inadvertently biased against one group or another — Hatta acknowledged that in internal tests, people with dyslexia performed poorly, for example. Do you think a test can truly identify startup fit? Send me your thoughts and feedback via email. Anna Hensel Heartland Tech Reporter Featured Video Check out this video from CNBC, “Finding low-skilled and high-skilled workers a challenge for supply chain companies” From the Heartland Tech channel Attracting tech talent to the Heartland starts with building a better startup culture Instead of putting all their efforts into attracting giants like Amazon, cities in the Heartland need to double down on what makes them unique. Utah’s Weave raises $37.5 million for its patient communication software Weave has raised a total of $82.6 million from Lead Edge Capital, Bessemer Venture Partners, Pelion Venture Partners, Y Combinator, and others. Beyond VB Amazon HQ2 and the ‘gentrification of jobs’ Amazon has said each HQ2 site will result in 25,000 jobs. Will the working-class benefit? Will Amazon train locals for future employment? (via CityLab) Indianapolis’ quiet, steady road to becoming a software hub Scott McCorkle used to be the chief executive of Salesforce’s Marketing Cloud division but he’s spent the last year quietly working on a new startup in the technology hub where he’s worked for over two decades: Indianapolis. (via Axios) Foxconn and The Village: The $10 billion factory deal that turned one small Wisconsin town upside down Much of Foxconn’s journey to Wisconsin played out on the national stage, with President Trump and ousted Gov. Scott Walker touting the deal while critics attacked it as an example of extravagant corporate welfare. (via The Verge) November Midwest Report: all of the region’s major tech fundings, M&As and IPOs this month While we’re primarily focused on Minne’s innovation economy, we also have our eyes on all of the startup and tech activity happening throughout the entire Midwest. (via American Inno)      
12 Dec 18
The Denver Post
A major development company fired an employee Wednesday as the Denver District Attorney’s Office reviewed city allegations of collusion in the planned expansion of the Colorado Convention Center. The city on Tuesday revealed potential misconduct in the [cq comment=”development”]bidding process for the $233 million project.[cq comment=”Cq”] Wednesday, the government released documents to The Denver Post with new details of the scandal. City officials believe Trammell Crow, a company that was managing the convention center project, “attempted to eliminate a bidder,” “improperly released City documents” and “altered plans without the City’s knowledge,” according to a letter signed by Eulois Cleckley, director of the Department of Public Works.[cq comment=”Cq”] Trammell Crow announced Wednesday that it had fired an unnamed employee. Bill Mosher, the company’s senior managing director in Denver, apologized in a statement “for the disruption to the convention center expansion project that has occurred because of the actions of our former employee.” Documents released by the city also say Mortenson Construction, a general contractor bidding on the project, “has been implicated in violations of the City’s requirements with regard to the integrity of its bidding process.”[cq comment=”Cq”] In another letter sent Tuesday, Mayor Michael Hancock asked that District Attorney Beth McCann investigate “potential illegal acts by private parties.” He said the city has “discovered potentially improper collusion between the City’s project management consultant and one of the proposers.”[cq comment=”Cq”] The letters imply that “they have discovered some kind of evidence that somebody was cheating, basically, to get the contract on their terms, or whatever they wanted to get,” said Jason Schall, a former federal prosecutor who isn’t involved in the matter.[cq comment=”Cq”] “We don’t know what that is yet, but typically there’s a quid pro quo — ‘You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.’ ” Trammell Crow and Mortenson, which have been involved with a number of major Denver projects, each launched an internal investigation and promised to cooperate with the city, according to statements from the companies.[cq comment=”Cq”] What happened? Denver voters approved partial funding for the convention center in 2015. The plan is to add a ballroom and outdoor terrace atop the center, plus technology upgrades and lobby renovations for the existing building. The initial public price estimate was $104 million, but that number grew to $233 million as plans were finalized. The budget gap will be funded in part by a new tax on hotel visits.[cq comment=”Cq”] The project was in the bidding phase, meaning that companies had submitted proposals in a competition to win the right to work on the project. City officials were preparing to interview a shortlist of three companies — Mortenson, Hensel Phelps Construction and PCL Construction Services.[cq comment=”Cq”] But things went off course in October, according to City Attorney Kristin Bronson.[cq comment=”Cq”] “A public works employee noticed what I would call an anomaly that appeared to be inconsistent with the city process and made some inquires,” she said. The responses to those questions were “problematic,” so the City Attorney’s Office got involved and hired outside attorneys. The investigation “included obtaining documents, reviewing emails, interviewing witnesses,” she said, “and we got to a point where it became very clear that we had a tainted process, that there had been collusion and that we’d gotten as far in our investigation as we could and that we needed to hand this over to the district attorney’s office.” City officials met with DA staff Monday night and formally requested a DA investigation Tuesday.[cq comment=”Cq”] The city also sent letters that day to all three of the shortlist bidders, announcing that the bidding process was canceled. The city has not made any allegations against PCL or Hensel Phelps.[cq comment=”Cq”] Construction was to begin late in 2019. The city hasn’t announced a new timeline.[cq comment=”Cq”] “With the reopening of the bid process, the city will work to minimize any delays and pursue all available legal remedies to recover damages,” wrote public works spokeswoman Nancy Kuhn in an email.[cq comment=”Cq”] The companies Trammell Crow, based in Dallas, has worked in Denver for 50 years, claiming $2 billion in Denver metro projects and purchases over the last decade.[cq comment=”Cq”] Mortenson, headquartered in Minneapolis, emphasizes its expertise in “virtual design and construction,” a specialty that it used on the sharp angles of the Denver Art Museum.[cq comment=”Cq”] Mortenson and Trammell Crow have partnered previously on major projects in Colorado: The Ralph L. Carr Colorado Judicial Center was developed by Trammell Crow with Mortenson as the builder.[cq comment=”Cq”] Trammell Crow is the developer and Mortenson the general contractor for the $196 million redevelopment of the Denver Water campus.[cq comment=”Cq”] The Denver Water project is still underway. “We do not know what, if any, impact they will have on our project,” wrote Denver Water spokesman Travis Thompson in an email. “We are gathering facts and determining our next steps.”[cq comment=”Cq”] The fallout The scandal already has delivered significant consequences, and they’re likely to keep coming. Trammell Crow’s now-canceled contract was worth about $9 million, and it’s not clear how much of that sum the company will collect.[cq comment=”Cq”] [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] The city also is re-examining Mortenson’s prequalification status for bidding on city contracts. The company recently completed three other contracts with Denver Public Works, and it still holds an on-call contract with that department.[cq comment=”Cq”] Hancock’s administration also will work with Denver City Council to strength the city’s debarment law, which allows it to ban companies from future city work, Bronson said.[cq comment=”Cq”] The DA’s white-collar-crime division is handling the case. “For it to start in the civil City Attorney’s Office … suggests a violation of a nondisclosure agreement, something like that,” according to Schall, the former prosecutor. “But clearly that entity, the City Attorney’s Office, had something that bothered them, potentially something that would be criminal, that they would send across the street to the DA’s office. The DA’s office has more resources to investigate — principally the grand jury.” The reactions Two of Hancock’s political challengers said the debacle is an example of a broader pattern. “It’s clearly a sign that things have gone too far, and it’s clearly a sign that the mayor’s not managing the city and he’s not paying attention,” said Penfield Tate, a mayoral candidate. As an example, he pointed to accusations that a former airport official rigged bidding for a restaurant contract.[cq comment=”Cq”] Tate called for an FBI investigation, saying that the case could involve political corruption. Bronson said she spoke with the state’s U.S. Attorney’s Office, and she said DA McCann could bring in federal agencies if appropriate.[cq comment=”Cq”] Mayoral candidate Lisa Calderón said the case mirrors her own experience. Her organization recently lost its contract to provide services to people leaving Denver’s jails. It was awarded to another group after a bidding process. In an ongoing lawsuit, she alleges retaliation.[cq comment=”Cq”] “I think it’s very serious. What I would like to see, actually, is a full audit of the major contracts, because I just don’t buy that it’s a one-off, something that is unusual. I think this is this administration’s way of doing business, and somehow it got out, so they’re making a big deal of doing an investigation,” Calderón said.[cq comment=”Cq”] Jamie Giellis, another candidate for mayor, said it is too early in the investigation to cast blame.[cq comment=”Cq”] The city is reviewing its existing contracts but has paused its investigation at the DA’s request, according to Bronson. The situation, she said, is “unprecedented in recent memory.”  
12 Dec 18
Fox17

[ooyala player_id=”5303db80d4274ad2b2ceadc3cffff2ae” auto=”true” width=”1920″ height=”1080″ pcode=”MxYjUyOnb8KHXFcDIFgvI4cxtHXW” code=”FnamZ1ZzE63UZf_EJuST9kA2JTImkb-P”] GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Disability activist and American poet Robert M. Hensel once said, “There is no greater disability in society, than the inability to see a person as more.” Two long-time friends are  on a mission to change that. Inside the kitchen at Central Reformed Church in Grand […]

12 Dec 18
Lynolu82 Site

High-quality lab report writing service is developed by our company to provide students with custom lab reports written from scratch. Get professional lab report help An excerpt from the Discussion section of a psychology report Both the alternative hypotheses for consensus and distinctiveness information were supported: high consensus and high distinctiveness information creates an external […]

12 Dec 18
Coins and Diamonds

#TuesdayThoughts #IAM #Nature #CountryRoads pic.twitter.com/ilB1t71af5 — Gary Hensel (@gary_hensel) December 11, 2018 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

12 Dec 18
Coins and Diamonds

#TuesdayThoughts #IAM #Nature #CountryRoads pic.twitter.com/ilB1t71af5 — Gary Hensel (@gary_hensel) December 11, 2018 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

12 Dec 18
Coins and Diamonds

#TuesdayThoughts #IAM #Nature #CountryRoads pic.twitter.com/ilB1t71af5 — Gary Hensel (@gary_hensel) December 11, 2018 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

11 Dec 18
The Denver Post
The city of Denver has frozen the bidding process for the quarter-billion-dollar expansion of the Colorado Convention Center after discovering misconduct, according to a news release issued Tuesday afternoon. Earlier this year, companies submitted competitive bids to design and build the $233 million project. The city was preparing to interview bidders when the City Attorney’s Office discovered the process was “irreparably compromised by non-city participants,” the city announced in the news release. The city has asked the Denver District Attorney’s Office to investigate. The DA’s office is reviewing the material but hasn’t made any decisions about its next steps. The city alleges that the process was compromised by the “improper release of city documents to a contractor bidding on the project; improper discussions about the bidding process; and altering of approved project plans.” Denver officials haven’t detailed who committed those alleged actions, but the news release said the city will terminate its $9 million contract with Trammell Crow for program management services. It also said Public Works Director Eulois Cleckley is “requesting a review of Mortenson’s prequalification status for bidding on future projects.” Mortenson was one of three bidding companies to make the project’s shortlist. “We believe this is a significant breach of the public trust and a willful violation of a competitive bidding process,” Mayor Michael Hancock said in the news release. “We will never tolerate this type of behavior from our contractors and will continue to address this swiftly and aggressively.” Bill Mosher, senior managing director of Dallas-based Trammell Crow, responded Tuesday: “The alleged actions in connection with the Colorado Convention Center project have in no way been authorized by Trammell Crow Company and are contrary to the firm’s values and longstanding business practices. We are cooperating fully with the City and are conducting our own internal investigation.” The company is a prominent player in Denver development. It had a major role in the Union Station redevelopment project and it is the master developer of Denver Water’s $196 million redevelopment project. Mortenson also is conducting an internal review of its participation in the bidding process and will cooperate with the city’s and DA’s investigations, said Maja Rosenquist, the contractor’s senior vice president. “We’ve received a letter from the city and county of Denver concerning termination of the RFP for the Colorado Convention Center Expansion project,” Rosenquist said. “We take the issues raised by the city very seriously and are committed to addressing this matter thoroughly and appropriately.” In addition to Mortenson, Hensel Phelps Construction Co. and PCL Construction Services also made the shortlist to compete for the project, according to public works spokeswoman Nancy Kuhn. The city mentioned neither of those companies in its news release. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] Voters approved partial funding for the convention center expansion in 2015. If you have relevant information, email akenney@denverpost.com or call 303-954-1785.
11 Dec 18
Coins and Diamonds

#TuesdayThoughts #IAM #Nature #CountryRoads pic.twitter.com/ilB1t71af5 — Gary Hensel (@gary_hensel) December 11, 2018 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

11 Dec 18
Coins and Diamonds

#TuesdayThoughts #IAM #Nature #CountryRoads pic.twitter.com/ilB1t71af5 — Gary Hensel (@gary_hensel) December 11, 2018 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js