Holiday

17 Jan 19
Little Hawk Yarns

Just into the new year and I am slowly getting back into a routine after the holidays. It has been a bit bumpy getting back into the routine of getting to bed early enough to get up on time. None of us has been too keen on getting up for school/work. I think we may […]

17 Jan 19
a.geraldine

New year, new you, new goals…and I’m quite sure one of the goals is to go travel? Like many, I try to make it a point to travel (near or far) at least once a year. If I could do it more, even better. But there is also that one common obstacle keeping us from […]

17 Jan 19
Viral Topic Zone

Lagos, Nigeria – When Fela Anikulapo Kuti died, so too did the flavour of Nigeria’s music scene. At the time, music in Nigeria was more than a lyrical lush, it was also about people power and activism. Fela’s Afrobeat from the 1970s to 90s helped those to flourish. There was always entertainment though, but far more vitality […]

17 Jan 19
Namaste Negro

By Tami Warren Never would I have imagined myself with a sincere need to defend the F.B.I. I am aware of the historical role the F.B.I. played in the civil rights movement, how Black leaders were maligned and targeted. The disgraceful statements regarding Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made by J. Edgar Hoover. Moreover, Hoover’s […]

17 Jan 19
UpStream

A new version of UpStream is available today. UpStream 1.23.1 has several small improvements and bug-fixes. We fixed a lot of small bugs and issues that had accumulated over the December holidays.

17 Jan 19
WWD

SEMrush compiled the online search data, globally.

17 Jan 19
Holly Hill

I’m five books into my 75 book challenge this year and this is my favorite book I’ve read so far. It really got me thinking about my time and how I spend it and I wanted to recommend it to you all and tell you a bit about it. This book has been out for […]

17 Jan 19
The Lollipop Gazette

Keep Your Germs to Yourself! Please please please! Do not go out with a sore throat, a cough, or fever–you will be doing yourself and others a favor. Seriously, if you feel miserable, why go and spread that to the surrounding world? I will talk more about how germs scientifically spread in another letter, but […]

17 Jan 19
10 Minute Play Every Day

A woman sits at a desk. She’s nervous. She straightens papers, pens, etc. Knock at the door.  Boss Lady Come in.  (another woman enters) Hi Sam, thanks for coming in.  Sam Hi, um, is this going to take long? I have a 2pm.  BOSS LADY No, not long. Don’t even worry about the 2pm.  SAM […]

17 Jan 19
The Sun
I RECENTLY visited the Hermitage in St Petersburg, Russia – one of the best art museums in the world. I was expecting to serenely experience its masterpieces, but my view was blocked by a wall of smart phones taking pictures of the paintings. Science suggests obsessively taking photos could hinder our ability to remember important occasions And where I could find a bit of empty space, there were people taking selfies to create lasting memories of their visit. For many people, taking hundreds, if not thousands, of pictures is now a crucial part of going on holiday – documenting every last detail and posting it on social media. But how does that affect our actual memories of the past – and how we view ourselves? As an expert on memory, I was curious. Unfortunately, psychological research on the topic is so far scant. But we do know a few things. We use smart phones and new technologies as memory repositories. The rise of high-quality cameras on widely available smartphones has led to a boom in amateur snappers This is nothing new – humans have always used external devices as an aid when acquiring knowledge and remembering. Writing certainly serves this function. Historical records are collective external memories. Testimonies of migrations, settlement or battles help entire nations trace a lineage, a past and an identity. In the life of an individual, written diaries serve a similar function. Memory effects Nowadays we tend to commit very little to memory – we entrust a huge amount to the cloud. Not only is it almost unheard of to recite poems, even the most personal events are generally recorded on our cellphones. Rather than remembering what we ate at someone’s wedding, we scroll back to look at all the images we took of the food. This has serious consequences. Taking photos of an event rather than being immersed in it has been shown to lead to poorer recall of the actual event – we get distracted in the process. Relying on photos to remember has a similar effect. Memory needs to be exercised on a regular basis in order to function well. There are many studies documenting the importance of memory retrieval practice – for example in university students. Memory is and will remain essential for learning. [bc_video video_id=”5662312307001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Tourist shoves his girlfriend to the floor in row over a selfie”] There is indeed some evidence showing that committing almost all knowledge and memories to the cloud might hinder the ability to remember. However, there is a silver lining. Even if some studies claim that all this makes us more stupid, what happens is actually shifting skills from purely being able to remember to being able to manage the way we remember more efficiently. This is called metacognition, and it is an overarching skill that is also essential for students – for example when planning what and how to study. There is also substantial and reliable evidence that external memories, selfies included, can help individuals with memory impairments. But while photos can in some instances help people to remember, the quality of the memories may be limited. We may remember what something looked like more clearly, but this could be at the expense of other types of information. One study showed that while photos could help people remember what they saw during some event, they reduced their memory of what was said. Identity distortions? There are some rather profound risks when it comes to personal memory. Our identity is a product of our life experiences, which can be easily accessed through our memories of the past. So, does constant photographic documentation of life experiences alter how we see ourselves? There is no substantial empirical evidence on this yet, but I would speculate that it does. Too many images are likely to make us remember the past in a fixed way – blocking other memories. While it is not uncommon for early childhood memories to be based on photos rather than the actual events, these are not always true memories. Another issue is the fact that research has uncovered a lack of spontaneity in selfies and many other photos. Relying on photos to commemorate special occasions can mean your struggle to remember the event They are planned, the poses are not natural and at times the image of the person is distorted. They also reflect a narcissistic tendency which shapes the face in unnatural mimics – artificial big smiles, sensual pouts, funny faces or offensive gestures. Importantly, selfies and many other photos are also public displays of specific attitudes, intentions and stances. In other words, they do not really reflect who we are, they reflect what we want to show to others about ourselves at the moment. If we rely heavily on photos when remembering our past, we may create a distorted self identity based on the image we wanted to promote to others. That said, our natural memory isn’t actually perfectly accurate. Research shows that we often create false memories about the past. We do this in order to maintain the identity that we want to have over time – and avoid conflicting narratives about who we are. So if you have always been rather soft and kind – but through some significant life experience decide you are tough – you may dig up memories of being aggressive in the past or even completely make them up. [bc_video video_id=”5570027556001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Brit inventor designs selfie gadget controlled using feet”] Having multiple daily memory reports on the phone of how we were in the past might therefore render our memory less malleable and less adaptable to the changes brought about by life – making our identity more stable and fixed. But this can create problems if our present identity becomes different from our fixed, past one. That is an uncomfortable experience and exactly what the “normal” functioning of memory is aimed to avoid – it is malleable so that we can have a non-contradictory narrative about ourselves. We want to think of ourselves as having a certain unchanging “core”. If we feel unable to change how we see ourselves over time, this could seriously affect our sense of agency and mental health. So our obsession with taking photos may be causing both memory loss and uncomfortable identity discrepancies. It is interesting to think about how technology changes the way we behave and function. As long as we are aware of the risks, we can probably mitigate harmful effects. The possibility that actually sends shivers to my spine is that we lose all those precious pictures because of some widespread malfunctioning of our smart phones. So the next time you’re at a museum, do take a moment to look up and experience it all. Just in case those photos go missing. By Giuliana Mazzoni, Professor of Psychology at the University of Hull for The Conversation. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN TECH” posts_category=”322″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] If this article didn’t put you off selfies, follow our guide to make the most of the iPhone Portait Mode. Alternatively, check out our round-up of the best Android phones you can buy right now. You can also get your selfies turned into a giant lollipop that you can actually eat. Are you a selfie obsessive who loves taking snaps at important moments? Let us know in the comments! We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
17 Jan 19
Lauren Primacio

March 27, 2018 – Lauren Primacio at the Our Lady of the Lake University Film Festival showcasing Careers in Christmastime, a holiday film about exploring passions.

17 Jan 19
All About the Grub

As many of you know, I normally don’t blog unless I’ve got a recipe to share, but once in a blue moon I run my mouth. Last time, I ranted endlessly about going keto vs. low carb. If it makes you feel any better, I don’t think this post is going to be quite as […]

17 Jan 19
Decorative Collectibles

Swarovski Crystal 2000 Annual Star Snowflake Christmas Holiday Ornament 1669509 – Buy – Swarovski Crystal 2000 Annual Star Snowflake Christmas Holiday Ornament 1669509

17 Jan 19
Sh** Happens

Whew!  The holiday season is over.  The stress of finding the right gift, making sure you stayed in budget for said gift, getting together with family, the list goes on and on and it seems the days get shorter and shorter.  Oh, wait, they do.  Each day leading up to Christmas there is a little […]

17 Jan 19
Earth to Ro

We’re big explorers, or so we like to think and we decided, with our four month old son in tow that we’d go to Iceland in Sprinter. You know, it’s not quite dark and snowy nor is it blindingly sunny. We thought, safer roads yet still a chance of catching a glimpse of our beloved Aurora. […]

17 Jan 19
Uber Lyft Drivers

The message, from a driver’s perspective, is clear – take the work you are given, or you may find the quality and quantity of the work offered starts to deteriorate. For centuries, the River Thames was London’s thoroughfare. Boats plied for hire to take the masses between the north and south banks. Others serviced many […]