Horror Comics

25 May 19
Batman News

Reviews and the discussions they inspire are a big part of why readers visit the Batman News comics section. So an article in which all of our reviewers engage in a discussion about that week’s titles? Why, you’d think it’s a no-brainer! And yet it took several years for the idea to cross our minds… […]

25 May 19
D-ROC at the Movies

Brightburn – Director: David Yarovesky Brightburn is brought to you by producer James Gunn, perhaps best known as the director of the massively entertaining Guardians of the Galaxy movies, he is also the director of such entertaining low budget horror movies as Slither. Here, he has teamed with his two screenwriting brothers for a movie […]

25 May 19
News Directory

Avengers: Endgame The conclusion is that unprecedented continuity, 22 films, will be undertaken from Marvel Studios. There were ups and downs along the way. Story essays were introduced, put up, and put down for use down the road. A character was born in a comic book, a way of origin stories, and killed them in […]

25 May 19
filmreviews719

Frankenstein is a horror film released in 1931. It was the first film to star Boris Karloff in the role of the monster a part he is associated with to this day. It also stars Colin Clive as Dr Henry Frankenstein, Mae Clarke as Elizabeth, Edward Van Sloane as Dr Waldman, Dwight Frye as Fritz […]

25 May 19
Elements of Screen Arts (2019)

Looking back at the history of the MCU, it really is amazing to see that obscure, relatively unknown characters would get blockbusters of their own such as Ant-man and the Guardians of the Galaxy. But after the box office success of those franchises with sequels planned or already being produced, a Doctor Strange adaption doesn’t […]

25 May 19
PPGuru

Here I am with another journal entry into the world of FREE COMIC BOOK DAY. For the past two weeks, I have reviewed half the offerings of this year’s stack which worked out to 51 titles given away in various categories, plus a DC added another title called Year of The Villain that costed a […]

25 May 19
News Archives Uk

What's new for Video on Demand and Netflix Home Ads, Amazon Prime, Hulu and other streaming services? AP This picture released by A24 Films shows Mahershala Ali (left) and Alex Hibbert in a scene from "Moonlight". Top streams for the week Winner of three Oscars (including the best picture) "moonlight"(2016, R) is a poetic and […]

25 May 19
News Directory

Montage Getty / Forward Some #MeToo men who tried to come back (from left), Les Moonves, James Franco, Garrison Keillor, John Lasseter, Bryan Singer On October 5, the New York Times published an investigation story about allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct by Harvey Weinstein's media mogle, going back over forty years. Since that day, […]

25 May 19
File 770

(1) NIXING BREXIT. In a letter to The Guardian, “John le Carré and Neil Gaiman join writers warning Brexit is ‘choosing to lose’”. Dozens of writers have put their names to a letter to the Guardian that urges UK voters taking part in Thursday’s European parliament elections to use their franchise to support the European […]

25 May 19
Live Feeds

Brightburn Screenwriters Interview: Mark and Brian Gunn /FILM Brightburn Proves Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel is the Definitive Superman Screen Rant ‘Brightburn’ Review: Superman’s Origin Story Gets a Thin But Entertaining Horror Makeover Collider.com How Brightburn Subverts the Superman Myth (Nerdist News Edition) Nerdist James Gunn Addresses If He Had Any Issues with DC Comics […]

24 May 19
hitchcockmaster

Publisher: McFarland Release Date: April 23, 2019 A Conversation with Wes D. Gehring An analysis of Alfred Hitchcock’s methodical use of comedy in his films is past due, and Hitchcock and Humor: Modes of Comedy in Twelve Defining Films helps to fill this void. The book examines what should be obvious: Hitchcock systematically incorporated assorted […]

24 May 19
The Reporter
Despite the glut of movies based on comic book superheroes since the start of the 21st century, not all comic protagonists are heroes — super or otherwise. Many are morally ambiguous, and the genre itself covers a much wider range of genres than just action or science fiction. Ryan King, a Vacaville native now residing in New York, has been penning comics for the last few years that blend a variety of genres. He is currently in the midst of funding his newest horror comic, “Cricketsong,” on Kickstarter. “We’re about 33 percent funded on the Kickstarter right now,” he said. “I feel pretty confident that we’re gonna get there.” The Will C. Wood High School graduate first became drawn — so to speak — to comics in his junior year at UC Davis when he read Alan Moore’s “Watchmen.” “As an English major, it kind of enlightened me as to what a writer could do with an artist, as far as collaboration goes, and the potential as a literary art form,” King said. Other early influences for King included “Black Hole” by Charles Burns and “Ghost World” by Daniel Clowes. “At the time, I worked at a library, so I was lucky enough to be surrounded by a lot of different forms of comics,” he said. King’s interest in alternative comics and graphic novels evolved over time, and he eventually got into manga, even traveling to Japan to further his comic interest. Ryan King, a Will C. Wood graduate, is funding his newest comic book, ‘Cricketsong,’ through Kickstarter. (Contributed Photo — Ryan King) King decided to become a comic creator, writing comics and short stories, having his work published in literary periodicals like the Yolo Crow, Nashville Review and Study Group Comics. King had initially contracted with another artist for one of his publications, and after that project fell through he began looking for other artists to fill that role. He considered the idea of working with webcomic artist Daryl Toh and asked one of his writer friends who had worked with Toh about his experiences. “He championed the idea of working with Daryl,” King said. After communicating online with Toh, the two collaborated on King’s 16-page comic “The Games We Played.” They worked together on another book which was twice as long, titled “Nico’s Fortune.” King and Toh’s latest collaboration, “Cricketsong,” is King’s longest work yet at 44 pages. “Cricketsong” is a crime thriller set in a Southern California desert centering around two primary characters: A millennial named Emile on his way to Burning Man and a smuggler named Barry. Emile hitches a ride with Barry, and the plot becomes what King describes as “a road trip gone wrong” with horror and crime elements. King took in a variety of influences for his book, including other “road trip gone wrong” movies, such as the 1986 horror film “The Hitcher” and the 1996 Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino road trip horror movie “From Dusk ’til Dawn” as well as hedonistic road novels like Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road,” Tom Wolfe’s “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” and Jon Krakauer’s “Into the Wild.” Part of King’s motivation to write the book was to have a story set in the Southern California desert, which he said provides a compelling backdrop for horror stories. “Most Stephen King fans know that he tells stories in Maine,” he said. “It’s his home state. I just wanted to tell something that was more akin to the state of California, and what better than Southern California, especially in the desert?” Moreover, King said he was a big fan of stories about being on the road and hitchhiking. “When you add the element of danger, it makes it even more interesting,” he said. Unlike King’s previous works, which have dabbled in science fiction or “campy horror,” “Cricketsong” is a mix of different genres. “It has elements of crime, mystery (and) horror,” he said. King also said that neither of the primary characters are ones the audience can root for but are still compelling, which he compared to the characterizations on “Breaking Bad.” “You have two antagonists, but you’re attached to them to see how they make it through, and if they’re gonna make it through,” he said. “I really like that way that modern storytelling is kind of set up where we could root for an antagonist and discover something about ourselves in a way.” Toh’s artwork, King said, gave the book a sun-drenched appearance not often seen in horror comics. “There’s not that many horror comics out there that take place during the day,” he said. “This is one that’s set in Southern California, so the color scheme is very bright hues, a lot of changing colors and very atmospheric.” King and Toh had success funding “Nico’s Fortune” through Kickstarter, so naturally they chose to repeat that process with “Cricketsong.” King said it was a good way for creators to gauge interest in a project without having to go through the traditional publishing route. “It allows a lot greater control especially with this comic,” he said. “It allows me to tell the story exactly how I want it without much editorial interference.” King has gotten creative input from friends and family, but not having a publisher has allowed him to keep his story as he wants. “I prefer to keep my own creator vision as intact as possible,” he said. “Kickstarter gives me the opportunity to do just that.” King believes readers will enjoy “Cricketsong,” which he sees as his strongest work. “I couldn’t have done this without my family and friends to help support this comic book, as well as my previous endeavors,” he said. “I appreciate everybody, including home fans in Vacaville, who helped me out.” The Kickstarter for “Cricketsong,” which can be accessed at kickstarter.com/projects/1115158019/cricketsong-a-horror-comic-by-daryl-toh-and-ryan-k, runs through June 7.
24 May 19
News Directory

While a show about a striker shows he wants to be an actor it is like a great unusual crowd, Bill Hader Barry has been critical and commercially successful. In the second season, we find that Hader and the co-creator Alec Berg are more likely with the subject. Meanwhile, they have found a way to […]

24 May 19
It's Latin For Cookies

What if a child from another world crash-landed on Earth, but instead of becoming a hero to mankind, he proved to be something far more sinister? – (Source)