Horse Racing

18 Jun 19
The Sun
BRITS have been warned to batten down the hatches as the UK prepares to be hit by 36 hours of thunderstorms. The Met Office has issued a yellow ‘severe’ weather warning for torrential rain, hail and lightning. [web_component id=”web-component-weather” url=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/components_static/weather/weather.c7783189.js” src=”https%3A%2F%2Fiframe.thesun.co.uk%2Fcomponents_static%2Fdata%2Fiframe-sc.html%3Fid%3Dweb-component-weather%26script%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.thesun.co.uk%252Fcomponents_static%252Fweather%252Fweather.c7783189.js”] Current map of weather warnings for the UK People in the south and south east of the country have been warned that their homes and businesses could be flooded or affected by power cuts. It comes after up to 600 residents were evacuated after “unprecedented” downpours saw double the monthly rainfall in just three days at Wainfleet, Lincolnshire. Rescue workers in the flood-hit town yesterday pumped out enough water to fill 225 Olympic swimming pools. 36 HOURS OF CHAOS Forecasters expect the south east of England will be the worst affected by the new storms, with the warning extending as far north as Hull. “There is a small chance that homes and businesses could be flooded quickly, with damage to some buildings from floodwater, lightning strikes, hail or strong winds,” the Met Office warning states. “Where flooding or lightning strikes occur, there is a chance of delays and some cancellations to train and bus services.” Brits were also warned about potential power cuts in homes and businesses. Met Office meteorologist Alex Burkill told Sun Online: “We are expecting to see the worst of the thunderstorms today, as the torrential rain sweeps in from south east England. “There’s going to be some seriously heavy rain ranging from 15mm to even 50mm in some parts of the country. “It’s not going to be very pleasant and you can expect slightly breezy weather, but temperatures are still going to be fairly warm, reaching highs of 24C on Tuesday in the south east.” TRAVEL DISRUPTIONS The yellow warning has so far been issued for Tuesday and Wednesday in the south east. Burkill added: “We are also expecting some lightning strikes to take place which will delay and maybe even cancel travel plans. “We urge people to take extra precautions when travelling during the warning.” After this week’s soaking saw June on track to be the coldest in 28 years, sunshine and warmer temperatures are set to return next week. But thunderstorms will hit from late Tuesday amid flood fears, with Atlantic fronts hitting the second half of the week and bringing a cool-down to 19C. [bc_video video_id=”6047732171001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Flooding takes over roads as bad weather hits the UK”] SEVERE FLOODS Sinkholes forced the M25 to close down last week as relentless thunderstorms and flash floods sparked weather warnings and travel chaos across England. Drivers were advised to avoid all but necessary road travel after more than one month’s rain fell in just 24 hours in parts of Kent and East Sussex. Hundreds of homes were evacuated in a Lincolnshire town following severe flooding, as the local MP has said residents are “by no means out of the woods yet”. Residents in at least 590 homes in Wainfleet and Thorpe Culvert were told to leave as waters continued to surge on Saturday, with further heavy rain predicted. The town first flooded on Wednesday after more than two months’ worth of rain fell in two days, causing the River Steeping to burst its banks. On Friday, three RAF helicopters dropped 270 one-tonne sandbags in an attempt to repair the bank. [pod_component pod_component_config_id=”20190604-signup-rTNwAwFxS” pod_component_config_url=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/nu-sun-pod-component-config-prod/20190604-signup-rTNwAwFxS.json” pod_component_config_loader_url=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/nu-sun-pod-loaders-prod/1.62.2/componentLoader.js?93861″ src=”https%3A%2F%2Fiframe.thesun.co.uk%2Fnu-sun-pod-widgets-prod%2Fiframe-pod.html%3Fid%3D20190604-signup-rTNwAwFxS%26script%3Dhttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.thesun.co.uk%2Fnu-sun-pod-loaders-prod%2F1.62.2%2FcomponentLoader.js%3F93861%26config%3Dhttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.thesun.co.uk%2Fnu-sun-pod-component-config-prod%2F20190604-signup-rTNwAwFxS.json”] The Royal Ascot horse racing, which starts on Tuesday is set for a swelter then a squelch as rains arrive towards the end of the day. Glastonbury Festival – due to kick off a week on Wednesday – risks mud with more showers due after 77mm of rain soaked Somerset this month, ex-BBC and Met Office forecaster John Hammond of weathertrending said. And tennis tournament Wimbledon, which runs from July 1-14, faces rain breaks, Mr Hammond warned. Worcestershire County Cricket Club’s New Road ground in Worcester fully submerged by floodwater following heavy rainfall in the area Residents try to visit their flood damaged homes in the village of Wainfleet, Lincolnshire Aerial pictures of flooding near Tewkesbury Abbey in Gloucestershire, where the rivers Avon and Severn collide and have burst their banks narrowly avoiding flooding the 12 century Abbey Worcestershire County Cricket Club’s New Road ground in Worcester fully submerged by floodwater following heavy rainfall in the area This man became fully submerged in the water as he tried to visit his flood-damaged house in Wainfleet, Lincolnshire Arial of flood hit homes after water levels have dropped in Lincolnshire A man walks through floodwater in Wainfleet, Lincolnshire A house surrounded by flood water on Matt Pit Lane in Wainfleet All Saints, Lincolnshire after the town had to deal with more than two months of rain in just two days Residents in 580 properties in and around Wainfleet will be moved amid concerns about flood defences along the River Steeping A woman was seen battling torrential downpours on Westminster Bridge last week MONSOON LOOMS The ‘European Monsoon’ phenomenon was blamed by The Weather Outlook. The Met Office, which says the ‘European Monsoon’ is caused by westerly winds regaining strength in late June, said the South-East is due dry periods with wet intervals into July, with the North-West wetter. June 1-13’s average UK maximum temperature was 15.5C. The last time the average UK maximum temperature was colder over the whole of June was 1991’s 14.8C, Met Office records show. Met Office forecaster Steven Keates said: “Coming days will feel like summer again and be completely different to the past week. [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN NEWS” posts_category=”316″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”recent” /] “Very hot air from the Mediterranean will bring humidity from Monday, with 23C, then 26C and 27C not out of the question on Tuesday and 25C on Wednesday. “But thunderstorms push across the UK from late Tuesday and through Wednesday. Weather warnings would not be a surprise. “The Atlantic looks like dominating the second half of the week, with cooler conditions and wetter especially in the North-West. Two people walk along a footpath in Edinburgh’s Princes Street Gardens, which have flooded due to the heavy rain This Pub beer garden in Bridgnorth flooded with a passing duck to the right in Shropshire Severe floods have hit Shropshire this week [bc_video video_id=”6048209037001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Festival goers struggle to get through the mud as they try to enjoy Download Festival “] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours
18 Jun 19

2– Bettinggods.com When it comes to horse racings bet then this site will be come in hand like a glove for you. It’s totally free to register and same time they will provide you with help and tips from different tipsters. Besides horse racing, they provide you with other sports events, like football and much more.

18 Jun 19
The Sun
OF all the races at Royal Ascot 2019 the Prince of Wales’s Stakes has to go down as an epic. We might have lost last year’s Derby winner Masar to the Hardwicke, but the field remains a mouth watering one and I simply can’t wait for the off at 3.40pm. Crystal Ocean looks better than ever Heading the cast for many in the Group 1 contest over nearly a mile and a quarter is last year’s Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe runner up Sea of Class, who drops in trip but who has never lacked pace. If on song, she will be hard to beat. And then there is Magical, who gave Enable a bit of a scare in the Breeders’ Cup Turf. But the advice as far as betting is concerned is to back CRYSTAL OCEAN each-way for Sir Michael Stoute and Frankie Dettori. Even at about 4-1! The King George second is fit and well and in tremendous form. As a strong stayer he will get a positive ride and I just can’t see how he can be out the first three unless he falls over. [article-rail-section title=”Latest in Horse Racing” posts_category=”343″ posts_number=”12″ query_type=”recent” /] Wednesday starts at 2.30pm with the Group 2 Queen Mary Stakes over 5f. I thought Good Vibes had a great each-way chance here, but she was pulled out yesterday so I’ll stick with FINAL SONG, who won well on debut over the course and distance and appears to operate with juice in the ground. Could stay on strongest for Charlie Appleby, Godolphin and Christophe Soumillon. From sprinters to stayers, with the Group 2 Queen’s Vase at 3.05pm over a mile and three quarters. The one I will bet to hit the frame here is NORWAY, who looks a big price for Aidan O’Brien. He was a fine second to Sir Dragonet in the Chester Vase, but was subsequently found out in the Derby when only eighth. I think he will get this trip well and has every chance. It’s the Group 2 Duke of Cambridge Stakes over a mile at 4.20pm. I’m not sure why, but Coronation third VERACIOUS has not been at her best this season for Sir Michael Stoute and has seemingly been ditched by Dettori. [boxout headline=”Matt Chapman’s TV tips”]2.30 Ascot – Final Song (Latest odds) 3.05 Ascot – Norway (Latest odds) 3.40 Ascot – Crystal Ocean (Latest odds) 4.20 Ascot – Veracious (Latest odds) 5.00 Ascot – Blue Mise (Latest odds) 5.35 Ascot – Temple Of Heaven (Latest odds) [/boxout] However, Oisin Murphy takes the ride and at her best she has strong each-way claims. The cavalry charge that is the Royal Hunt Cup is over a mile at 5pm. BLUE MIST was a real eye catcher from off the pace in the Victoria Cup for Roger Charlton and will relish this extra furlong. He finished fast into sixth on that seasonal debut and as an animal who has raced up to a mile and a quarter it’s no surprise the distance was sharp on debut. Fine place claims here. And finally on Day 2 the Listed Windsor Castle Stakes closes the afternoon over 5f at 5.35pm. TEMPLE OF HEAVEN looks a typically tough juvenile for the Richard Hannon team. He’s battled for wins at Nottingham and Newbury and that willing attitude might be crucial here. Is he good enough? The race will tell us. So best of luck and once again I’m hoping for a Yeeehaaa or two! [bc_video video_id=”6046058948001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Soldier falls from horse at Trooping the Colour celebrations for Queen’s birthday”]
18 Jun 19
Sagebrush Rider

Reno – The Reno Rodeo, which kicks off for ten-days on June 20, has a full slate of family-friendly events and activities including Kids’ Day, Mutton Bustin’ and Special Kids’ Rodeo, all of which are sure to fill the days with memorable experiences for the whole family. Wild Pony Races — June 21-24Catch the Wild Pony […]

18 Jun 19
Daily Breeze
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Orange County Register
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Daily News
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Whittier Daily News
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Pasadena Star News
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Press Telegram
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Redlands Daily Facts
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Press Enterprise
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
Daily Bulletin
There’s no question that horse racing is a spectacle. There are few moments as breathtaking as 20 1,000-pound thoroughbreds surging through the homestretch of Churchill Downs at nearly 40 miles an hour. But at what cost? Each year, hundreds of horses die while racing and training. This is the only sport in our country where we accept – even expect – athletes to die in competition. According to the Jockey Club the number of horse deaths is trending downward, but the group still reported 493 dead racehorses in 2018. The number is likely higher as not all tracks report. Attention lately has been focused on Santa Anita Park in Los Angeles where 29 horses died this racing season, which started December 26 and concludes this weekend. But this doesn’t even rate as a particularly bad year for that track. Last season, 44 horses died there; during the two seasons before that, 64 and 62 died respectively. So in just four seasons of racing, at just this one track, 199 horses have died. How can that number be acceptable to any of us? How many horses have to die before we decide it’s too many? In my opinion, the public isn’t aware of the terrible toll on horses, and until those numbers are understood, we’ll continue to see more deaths. The only solution is to take a close look at racing across the country. And as the California horse racing circuit moves this month from Santa Anita to Los Alamitos and then to Del Mar, both tracks should receive the same level of scrutiny that Santa Anita has come under. Something is wrong and it needs to be addressed. Foreign tracks According to the Jockey Club, the United States sees between 2.5 and 5 times as many racehorses die compared to other racing countries. That means they’re doing something right and we’re doing something very wrong. One clear area of difference is the use of medication. Unlike other countries, the United States has no national standard regarding the use of medications on horses. With horses entered to run more races more frequently, medication becomes an important tool to keep horses able to compete. Legal drugs are frequently used to counteract pain or to make horses run faster. It has to be considered whether these medications lead to longer-term health issues and whether the cumulative stress from the overtraining that these medications allow leads to increased injury and death. One of the questions that has gained particular prominence is whether drugs should be given to counter symptoms or conditions that would otherwise prevent a horse from racing. The drug Lasix in particular has become so widespread that it is administered to the vast majority of horses before races. This isn’t because all the horses need it, it’s because in addition to preventing bleeding into the lungs, it also acts as a diuretic, allowing horses to lose weight before a race and giving them an advantage. In my opinion, if a horse needs a drug to treat bleeding into the lungs, it shouldn’t be racing in the first place. And if horses are routinely given such a drug purely for performance reasons, it ought to be banned from the sport. Many racing countries like Japan and Australia don’t allow Lasix on race days and some, like Germany, ban its use outright. The United States also doesn’t have standard regulations for the use of whips or limitations on the number of practices and races a horse can run in a given time period. We don’t even have consistent, mandatory reporting requirements for horse deaths at race tracks, so it’s impossible to know the full extent of this problem. These are all areas we need to look to for possible reforms. Reforms are needed It’s important to note that some reforms have already been made. Perhaps because of the national spotlight on Santa Anita, California in particular is moving in the right direction. The California Horse Racing Board will consider a plan to ban the use of Lasix for two-year old horses beginning in 2020 and eventually eliminate the drug entirely. A national consortium of 20 tracks has a similar – though voluntary – plan in the works. We should investigate whether these changes can be accelerated to remove this drug from the sport entirely. California is in also in the process of implementing new rules limiting the use of horse whips, and the state legislature is moving forward with a law that would give the oversight board authority to immediately suspend the license of a racetrack if the safety of horses or jockeys is at risk. And last week Gov. Newsom reached an agreement with Santa Anita to require an additional review of each horse’s medical records and training history before it’s permitted to race. This new protocol should be extended to all racetracks in California. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]These are all good changes, but they don’t substitute for a comprehensive review of what other actions have been taken at foreign tracks in order to reduce the deaths of horses here at home. It shouldn’t take hundreds of dead horses to make progress toward a safer sport. We don’t accept that there will be athlete fatalities in other sports; it should be no different for horse racing. There will always be risks for horses and jockeys in this sport, but we should be doing everything we can to ensure that the number of fatal injuries is as close to zero as possible. Horse racing has a long tradition in this country, but that tradition is on the downswing. Fewer Americans go to the track each year, while at the same time, more and more stress is being placed on horses to make money. The result appears to be dangerous conditions that contribute to dead horses. We need to take a long, hard look at the future of horse racing in this country, and we need to do it before more horses needlessly die. Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate.
18 Jun 19
USA TODAY Sportsbook Wire

It’s been one year since gambling in the United States, and ultimately the entire sports landscape, was altered inexorably when New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy walked up to the betting window at the Monmouth Park Sports Book by William Hill and began this grand experiment by plunking down $20 future wagers on Germany winning the […]

18 Jun 19
Search Wildly

Duke-UNC Ticket Prices Hit Super Bowl Levels Feb 20 10 AM Ticket prices for Wednesday’s game between Duke and North MLB Jerseys China Carolina have reached amounts typically reserved for Super Bowls. It’s the same routine every home game; the challenge is trying to capture something new or unexpected – which might be a different […]

18 Jun 19
The Art Of Chart

Lord Glitters Strikes in Dramatic Queen Anne Stakes – BloodHorse.com By Lord Glitters Strikes in Dramatic Queen Anne Stakes  BloodHorse.com Kate Middleton dazzles in sheer blue dress at Royal Ascot  Fox News Kate Middleton (and Her Flower Hat!) Lights up Royal Ascot Alongside Prince William and the Queen  PEOPLE.com Royal Ascot 2019 LIVE results: Horse racing action on […]