Hunter Safety System

19 Jul 19
News Africa Now

Fayemi ADO – EKITI – A Yoruba adage says ‘ Seamless burials should be designed for a child who chooses to die many times in order to taunt his parents” . Such is the case of the twin evils of banditry and kidnappings in Ekiti State.. Nigeria ,as a country is no doubt, is facing a […]

18 Jul 19
CauseACTION Clarion

Winston Churchill Winston Churchill became prime minister of Britain on May 10, 1940. World War II would rage another year and a half before the entrance of Unite States. The situation in Europe was desperate, as two massive Nazi armies were driving back British, French, Dutch, Polish and Belgian troops to the English Channel, bottling […]

18 Jul 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Daily News
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Press Telegram
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Orange County Register
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Daily Breeze
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Pasadena Star News
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Whittier Daily News
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Press Enterprise
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Daily Bulletin
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Redlands Daily Facts
Reaction to news, quasi-news and occasional non-news across the Pac-12, both on the field (and court) and off Rising: USC. The Trojans haven’t set foot on the field since early April but recently took a significant step toward long-haul improvement with an adjusted approach to scheduling. They announced UC Davis as an opponent in 2021. The move leaves UCLA and Notre Dame as the only major college programs to never schedule a team from the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). (More on the Bruins below.) We don’t know how often the Trojans will slot FCS opponents into future schedules, but the option will lighten their load when deemed necessary. And it’s necessary. USC’s path into the College Football Playoff – a path it has yet to navigate successfully – currently features 10 opponents from the Pac-12 (including the championship game), plus Notre Dame and two other FBS foes. That’s 11 Power Five opponents, and sometimes 12, with a selection process that has not looked kindly on contenders with two losses. Swap FBS for FCS – or Power Five for FCS – and USC’s prospects for 13-0/12-1 would brighten without materially damaging the strength-of-schedule. But that’s not the only benefit to USC’s revamped approach. The Pac-12 is loosening restrictions on the dates of nonconference games in future years, allowing teams to step out of league in October and November. The change, in theory, will add balance to the 12-game schedule and provide a respite from the weekly grind when it’s most needed: during the stretch run. But the vast majority of Power Five and Group of Five programs are locked into conference games at that point in the season. FCS teams, on the other hand, have more flexibility, especially if the price is right. If the Trojans want relief on the first Saturday of November, for example, they’re more likely to find a willing opponent in the FCS. We won’t say the shift is overdue, because a program of USC’s stature should aim high. But the realities of college football are different, with the conference championship game and the playoff, than they were a decade ago. Rising: Oregon basketball Not surprisingly, Coach Dana Altman has rounded up a handful of transfers to bolster his depleted roster and transform the outlook for the Ducks in 2020. * Forward Shakur Juiston, who averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds for UNLV in two seasons ago, when he was last healthy. • Guard Chris Duarte, the National Junior College Player of the Year from Northwest Florida State College. • Guard Anthony Mathis, a grad transfer from New Mexico who averaged 14 points for the Lobos (and was a prep teammate of Payton Pritchard). Add that trio to Pritchard, Will Richardson and Francis Okoro — plus heralded recruit C.J. Walker — and the Ducks have a core that could compete for a top-tier finish. Altman does an exceptional job not only attracting but  assimilating newcomers, using an offensive system that can be easily grasped and quickly tweaked to fit his personnel. The Hotline isn’t planning to update our order-of-finish projections until the fall, but Oregon assuredly will move into the top half. Altman’s latest merry band of transfers should carry a wallop. Falling: Washington State football. The list of Pac-12 teams that can afford to lose all-conference defensive backs unexpectedly is, well, nonexistent. The back line is more important than any unit, with the possible exception of edge rushers, given the offensive schemes that dominate the sport. And WSU lost a good one recently – one of the best, in fact. In late June, just before the Hotline headed out on vacation, WSU announced safety Jalen Thompson would enter the NFL supplemental draft after being declared ineligible for his final season in Pullman. Thompson’s transgression: He purchased an over-the-counter supplement at a local nutrition store, according to the Spokesman-Review, and that supplement apparently was on the NCAA’s no-no list. (It was not a steroid, the S-R added.) An honorable mention all-conference selection last season and a second-team pick in 2017, Thompson’s departure is a major blow to a defense already thumped by attrition. (In the secondary alone, the Cougars must replace starting cornerbacks Darrien Molton and Sean Harper, nickelback Hunter Dale and now Thompson, the anchor.) Mike Leach has infused the roster with a level of quality depth that few could have imagined five or six years ago, and his shrewd coordinator hires (Alex Grinch and Tracy Claeys) have maximized the personnel. The Cougars faced a significant challenge on defense in 2019 prior to Thompson’s departure. Now, his task looks daunting. Falling: UCLA football. As noted above in the USC section, the Bruins and Notre Dame are the last teams standing in the FCS no-play category. Their philosophy – a sound one, we should add – has always been that fans want to see quality opponents in the Rose Bowl and that UCLA should have the personnel to compete against anyone. And to a certain extent, pride was part of the calculation. But given the realities of the sport, the Bruins should swallow hard and open their schedule to FCS opponents. Then: The Rose Bowl was the ultimate goal, and nonconference games played no role in that pursuit. Now: Every loss counts in the CFP era, with the conference championship providing an added challenge. And in our view, fans don’t differentiate between UC Davis and San Jose State, or Northern Arizona and Utah State, when contemplating a ticket purchase and drive to the stadium. The Bruins, for the reasons stated in the USC section, should change their strategy. And they can always say USC caved first. Why we need your support: Like so many other providers of local journalism across the country, the Hotline’s parent website, mercurynews.com, recently moved to a subscription model. A few Hotline stories will remain free each month (as will the newsletter), but for access to all content, you’ll need to subscribe. The good news for Hotline faithful: I’ve secured a discount: 12 cents per day for 12 months. Click here to subscribe. And thanks for your loyalty. *** Send suggestions, comments and tips (confidentiality guaranteed) to pac12hotline@bayareanewsgroup.com or call 408-920-5716 *** Follow me on Twitter: @WilnerHotline *** Pac-12 Hotline is not endorsed or sponsored by the Pac-12 Conference, and the views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the Conference.
18 Jul 19
Red Pill Doctor

IT BEGINS: Epstein Indicted, Black-Ops Mega-Base Destroyed! IT BEGINS: Epstein Indicted, Black-Ops Mega-Base Destroyed! By David Wilcox IT’S TRUE: Jeffrey Epstein has actually been arrested. Indictments have been unsealed. This is the case that will bring down the House of Cards. Everything we just prognosticated in DECLAS is coming true. Big Tech knew this was […]

18 Jul 19
Dave's World

It seems to me that rights of ownership should be balanced by responsibilities. I think the concept of having extended ownership rights has gotten out of hand. We now have the sanctity of ownership granted to the dead and to artificial constructs without morals or consciences such as corporations, trusts and mutual funds, which manage […]

18 Jul 19
Bonding Sports

Each year, there is an immense amount of talent that comes after the 7 rounds of the draft are over. Last year, we saw a first-year undrafted free agent make the pro bowl, (Phillip Lindsay). Some players get lucky and get put into good situations, others have to work for it. The undrafted game is […]

18 Jul 19
Fortune
Berkeley, Calif. is taking gender neutral to the next level. The city has passed an ordinance to replace terms in its municipal codes that refer to gender with non gender-specific words. So, for instance, a manhole will become “maintenance hole,” while a sorority or fraternity will now be called a “collegiate Greek system residence.” “He” and “She” become “they” and “them” and forget about saying “manpower” (now “human effort” or “workforce”) or “brother/sister” (“sibling”). “In recent years, broadening societal awareness of transgender and gender nonconforming identities has brought to light the importance of non-binary gender inclusivity,” the referral reads. “The League of California Cities saw the need to develop a best practices guide for city officials and city staff related to new state laws, policies, and practices that promote inclusive workplaces. Included in the list of recommendations, is for municipalities to replace all gendered terms within their Municipal Code with gender-neutral terms.” The item passed without discussion or debate. Among the other terms getting new non-gendered replacements are: “Bondsman” becomes “Bonds-person” “Chairman” becomes “Chair“ or “chairperson” “Craftsmen” becomes “Craftspeople” or “artisans” “Fireman,” “Firewoman,” “Firemen,” and “Firewomen” become “Firefighter” and “firefighters” “Fraternal” is now “Social” “Heirs” becomes “Beneficiaries” “Journeyman” becomes “Journey” ‘Maiden” becomes “Family” “Male” and “female” become “People of different genders” “Manmade” becomes “Human-made,” “Master” becomes “Captain,” “Skipper,” “Pilot,” “Safety Officer,” or “Central” “Ombudsman” becomes “Ombuds” or “Investigating Official” “Patrolmen” become “Patrol” or “Guards” “Policeman,” “Policewoman,” “Policemen,“ “Policewomen” become “Police Officer” or “Police Officers” “Pregnant” (woman, women) become “Pregnant employees” “Repairman” becomes “Repairs” or “Repairer” “Salesman” becomes “Salesperson” or “Salespeople” “Sportsman” becomes “Hunters” “Watchmen” becomes “Guards” More must-read stories from Fortune: —Sallie Krawcheck wants CEOs to “break the wheel” to solve the diversity crisis —What’s next in blockchain? Ask this teenage engineer —Accenture names a new CEO: Julie Sweet —Here’s how to get more women in leadership —Thirty-five U.S states still charge women a tampon tax Keep up with the world’s most powerful women with Fortune‘s Broadsheet newsletter.