Irregular Choice

09 Dec 18
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1467726-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1467726-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1467726-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1467726-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, right, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, and Arthur Ludice, nurse manager, discuss with Vanessa Macias, center, about hers son’s condition on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, at Sunrise Children’s Hospital in Las Vegas. Macias’ 1-year-old son Roman was born Dec. 13, 2017, has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Vanessa Macias weeps as she speaks Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, during an interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal about her 1-year-old son Roman Ludice, who was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at Sunrise Children Hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Vanessa Macias weeps as she speaks Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, during an interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal about her 1-year-old son Roman Ludice, who was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at Sunrise Children Hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, left, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, discusses with Vanessa Macias, about hers son’s condition on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, at Sunrise Children’s Hospital in Las Vegas. Macias’ 1-year-old son Roman was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, checks Roman Ludice at Sunrise Children’s Hospital on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, in Las Vegas. Ludice was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye One-year-old Roman Ludice at his hospital bed at Sunrise Children’s Hospital on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, in Las Vegas. Ludice was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, right, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, speaks Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, during an interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal as he talks about 1-year-old Roman Ludice. Ludice was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at Sunrise Children Hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Roman Macias was born with a broken heart. Now, doctors are on a mission to fix it. Over the past year, staff at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center have been repairing Roman’s heart, which lacks a left ventricle due to a congenital condition called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Because of it, his heart has trouble pumping blood into the rest of his little body. Despite the severity of his case, Roman is a survivor. When the boy celebrates his first birthday Thursday in the warmth of a hospital bed in Sunrise Children’s Hospital’s pediatric intensive care unit, where he has spent his entire life so far, it will be a major milestone for his caregivers and mother, Vanessa, who calls Roman her blessing. “I didn’t think we were going to make it this far at all, but here we are,” Macias said as she wiped tears from her eyes on a recent Monday. “The odds have always been against that kid. I think I always dwell on the odds, but he’s proven them wrong.” Finding care Each day that Roman lives is a success, his doctor and pediatric ICU medical director, Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, said. Just a couple of months into Macias’ pregnancy, an ultrasound confirmed her son’s heart defect. She was living in Mesquite at the time and traveled to Dixie Regional Medical Center in St. George, Utah, for care. “That’s when I had the choice of going to Salt Lake City or Vegas (to deliver), and I’m like, ‘OK, how do I go six hours away, being pregnant, by myself?’” Macias remembered thinking to herself. “And I ended up here.” Since his premature birth at 35 weeks, Roman has undergone two risky surgeries to repair his heart and the tiny vessels in his lungs — a complication of his condition — along with several other smaller procedures. And for the past year, Roman’s fight for life has been an uphill battle, Ingaramo said. “He has all the possible spectrum of complications, unfortunately,” he said. ‘Day by day’ Roman has a heart arrhythmia. While surgeries can help restore some heart function, doctors cannot construct the missing left ventricle. That leaves the blood only partially oxygenated, causing an irregular heartbeat. At one point, Roman was placed in a medically induced coma to keep him from moving. The additional agitation could have had lethal effects, Ingaramo said. After an open heart surgery in April, Roman’s heart stopped, Ingaramo said. He was placed on a heart and lung bypass machine called ECMO until he stabilized. “Now, he’s slowly getting better — but it’s taking us a long way,” he said. Roman still receives medication daily, including nitric oxide to help him breathe. He will need 24-hour medical care for the rest of his life, Ingaramo said. The condition itself isn’t a death sentence. With advances in surgical techniques and technology, some with HLHS are living into young adulthood. Still, Roman is one of the sickest babies Ingaramo has seen in his time as a pediatric intensivist. “Roman is fighting day by day,” he said. Celebrating a milestone It’s been worth it, according to Mom. “That little boy has changed me in so many ways,” Macias said. When Thursday rolls around, Macias and the pediatric ICU will celebrate Roman’s first birthday together. Nurses have ordered two cakes — one for smashing, the other for eating — and a birthday banner will be plastered with a photograph of Roman. Macias said she looks forward to celebrating with staff, who have become like family. “Every moment where I’ve had a rough patch with Roman, they’re the ones who are standing there picking me up at the end of the day,” Macias said. As for her hopes and dreams for her almost 1-year-old son, Macias keeps it simple. “I just hope he gets better,” she said. “That’s it.” Contact Jessie Bekker at jbekker@reviewjournal.com or 702-380-4563. Follow @jessiebekks on Twitter. [rjtemplate class=”rj-isidebar3-elem”] About hypoplastic left heart syndrome Around 960 babies, or one in every 4,344 newborns, are born with the condition annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the cause of hypoplastic left heart syndrome is unknown, some children with the disease have a genetic predisposition, the CDC says. In some cases, a baby may be able to treat the condition through heart transplant. Ingaramo said Roman was determined ineligible for a transplant. [/rjtemplate]
09 Dec 18
Las Vegas Review-Journal
#gallery-1547400-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1547400-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1547400-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1547400-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, right, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, and Arthur Ludice, nurse manager, discuss with Vanessa Macias, center, about hers son’s condition on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, at Sunrise Children’s Hospital in Las Vegas. Macias’ 1-year-old son Roman was born Dec. 13, 2017, has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Vanessa Macias weeps as she speaks Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, during an interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal about her 1-year-old son Roman Ludice, who was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at Sunrise Children Hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Vanessa Macias weeps as she speaks Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, during an interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal about her 1-year-old son Roman Ludice, who was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at Sunrise Children Hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, left, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, discusses with Vanessa Macias, about hers son’s condition on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, at Sunrise Children’s Hospital in Las Vegas. Macias’ 1-year-old son Roman was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, checks Roman Ludice at Sunrise Children’s Hospital on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, in Las Vegas. Ludice was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye One-year-old Roman Ludice at his hospital bed at Sunrise Children’s Hospital on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, in Las Vegas. Ludice was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at the hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, right, Sunrise Children’s Hospital PICU Medical director, speaks Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, during an interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal as he talks about 1-year-old Roman Ludice. Ludice was born Dec. 13, 2017 and has been at Sunrise Children Hospital with a rare heart condition since. Bizuayehu Tesfaye Las Vegas Review-Journal @bizutesfaye Roman Macias was born with a broken heart. Now, doctors are on a mission to fix it. Over the past year, staff at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center have been repairing Roman’s heart, which lacks a left ventricle due to a congenital condition called hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Because of it, his heart has trouble pumping blood into the rest of his little body. Despite the severity of his case, Roman is a survivor. When the boy celebrates his first birthday Thursday in the warmth of a hospital bed in Sunrise Children’s Hospital’s pediatric intensive care unit, where he has spent his entire life so far, it will be a major milestone for his caregivers and mother, Vanessa, who calls Roman her blessing. “I didn’t think we were going to make it this far at all, but here we are,” Macias said as she wiped tears from her eyes on a recent Monday. “The odds have always been against that kid. I think I always dwell on the odds, but he’s proven them wrong.” Finding care Each day that Roman lives is a success, his doctor and pediatric ICU medical director, Dr. Oscar Ingaramo, said. Just a couple of months into Macias’ pregnancy, an ultrasound confirmed her son’s heart defect. She was living in Mesquite at the time and traveled to Dixie Regional Medical Center in St. George, Utah, for care. “That’s when I had the choice of going to Salt Lake City or Vegas (to deliver), and I’m like, ‘OK, how do I go six hours away, being pregnant, by myself?’” Macias remembered thinking to herself. “And I ended up here.” Since his premature birth at 35 weeks, Roman has undergone two risky surgeries to repair his heart and the tiny vessels in his lungs — a complication of his condition — along with several other smaller procedures. And for the past year, Roman’s fight for life has been an uphill battle, Ingaramo said. “He has all the possible spectrum of complications, unfortunately,” he said. ‘Day by day’ Roman has a heart arrhythmia. While surgeries can help restore some heart function, doctors cannot construct the missing left ventricle. That leaves the blood only partially oxygenated, causing an irregular heartbeat. At one point, Roman was placed in a medically induced coma to keep him from moving. The additional agitation could have had lethal effects, Ingaramo said. After an open heart surgery in April, Roman’s heart stopped, Ingaramo said. He was placed on a heart and lung bypass machine called ECMO until he stabilized. “Now, he’s slowly getting better — but it’s taking us a long way,” he said. Roman still receives medication daily, including nitric oxide to help him breathe. He will need 24-hour medical care for the rest of his life, Ingaramo said. The condition itself isn’t a death sentence. With advances in surgical techniques and technology, some with HLHS are living into young adulthood. Still, Roman is one of the sickest babies Ingaramo has seen in his time as a pediatric intensivist. “Roman is fighting day by day,” he said. Celebrating a milestone It’s been worth it, according to Mom. “That little boy has changed me in so many ways,” Macias said. When Thursday rolls around, Macias and the pediatric ICU will celebrate Roman’s first birthday together. Nurses have ordered two cakes — one for smashing, the other for eating — and a birthday banner will be plastered with a photograph of Roman. Macias said she looks forward to celebrating with staff, who have become like family. “Every moment where I’ve had a rough patch with Roman, they’re the ones who are standing there picking me up at the end of the day,” Macias said. As for her hopes and dreams for her almost 1-year-old son, Macias keeps it simple. “I just hope he gets better,” she said. “That’s it.” Contact Jessie Bekker at jbekker@reviewjournal.com or 702-380-4563. Follow @jessiebekks on Twitter. [rjtemplate class=”rj-isidebar3-elem”] About hypoplastic left heart syndrome Around 960 babies, or one in every 4,344 newborns, are born with the condition annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the cause of hypoplastic left heart syndrome is unknown, some children with the disease have a genetic predisposition, the CDC says. In some cases, a baby may be able to treat the condition through heart transplant. Ingaramo said Roman was determined ineligible for a transplant. [/rjtemplate]
09 Dec 18
Recovery is a Roller Coaster

I’d like to write this blog about all of the different things that can happen to your body from an eating disorder. Most people don’t talk about any of these things because they are terrible, off-putting things that can happen to your body. I will also share what I experienced personally with each of these […]

09 Dec 18
Russia News Now

All NVA ministers are now fired and replaced. Government will continue as a minority government!!! NVA (right wing) is against the Marrakesh migration pact (also called the European suicide pact) and has tried to convince the other members of the government to not sign it. Majority of the government wants to sign it so NVA […]

09 Dec 18
Shopper Explore

Keep your camera and a range of accessories with you thanks to this excellent Nikon DSLR Camera with Accessory Bundle._____________________________________________________________Nikon D5 DSLR Camera – Black, Body OnlyYou’ll be able to capture truly gorgeous photographs with the Nikon D5 – its 20.8 megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor is paired with a 180K pixel RGB metering sensor to […]

09 Dec 18
News Archives Uk

ONCE at a time, Jess Pasco would probably have ignored the "little pimple" under her nose. When it disappeared, leaving a small patch of dry, the 32-year-old could have given it a little thought. Jess Pasco Jess got her 'spot' checked out – and it was lucky she did But her shock experience with melanoma […]

09 Dec 18
D's social issue blog

Generally,people, while living moment to find happiness and inner peace; live from day to day is based on. This brings with unhappiness, anger, anxious, love seeking. Due to the fact that to be in relationship very often make the soul and the body are collapsed. This situation, which consists of an irregular life, only lives […]

09 Dec 18
meanderings

Chapter 5 — Peyton — Future

09 Dec 18
FitnessBlogg

What is caffeine? Caffeine is stimulant drug, which means it speeds up the messages travelling between the brain and the body. It`s found in the seeds,nuts and leaves of a number of different plants, including: Coffea Arabica (used for coffee) Thea sinensis (used for tea) Cola acuminata (used as a nut, tea or in soft […]

09 Dec 18
Weapons and Warfare

“Keep to your Sabers, Men”: J.E.B. Stuart’s Charge at Gettysburg. Robert E. Lee’s Confederate cavalry prepared a last desperate charge on the Union lines at Gettysburg. The Confederate cavalry held the high ground at Cress’s Ridge overlooking the York Turnpike, but quick-moving Union cavalry blocked the roads back to Gettysburg. Stuart’s ride (shown with a […]

09 Dec 18

Note: This is part 6 of me and my brother’s Advent Letters project.  If you missed last week’s letter, read it here.  For an explanation of the project and to get caught up on last year’s letters, click here. ______________________ Matt and Jer chased down the street after Brian. But a team of penguins with […]

09 Dec 18
33andme

Well its Sunday morning, the weekend isnt yet over and its already been the most eventful weekend for a while. Not as exciting as it actually sounds. The cause of my last couple of weeks anxiety was the work Christmas doo on Friday. What was I going to wear? What was I going to drink? […]