Isabella

17 Jun 19
Travels Without Maverick

Our first full day in Split was packed with fun! We first went on a tour of the city, which was not great but gave us a good overview of the Diocletian Palace that makes up the main part of the Old Town. It is the former “summer home” of the Roman emperor Diocletian, who […]

17 Jun 19
RSU 18 Messenger

Congrats to all of our Bikes for Books Winners!!!! 3rd Grade Winners: TerriAnne Johnson & Conner Quimby 4th Grade Winners:  Kayden Violette & Ruby LaBonte 5th Grade Winners:  Isabella Stratton & Caylub Logan

17 Jun 19
Icon Vs. Icon

The first look at Academy Award®-winner Steven Spielberg’s WEST SIDE STORY has been revealed. An adaptation of the original Broadway musical, WEST SIDE STORY explores young love and tensions between rival gangs the Jets and the Sharks on the streets of 1957 New York. The film is now in production for Twentieth Century Fox. Pictured […]

17 Jun 19
faerieontheshelf

“Although my memoirs are of course the story of my life and career, they are also a story of discovery: of curiosity, and investigation, and learning, not only regarding dragons but many other topics.” The Memoirs of Lady Trent is a five-book series by Marie Brennan all about dragons and dragon naturalism, set in a […]

17 Jun 19
Remembrance NI

Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery at Villers-Guislain, France.

17 Jun 19
Theatre West Four

Theatre West Four will be holding auditions for its Autumn production of Agatha Crusty and The Village Hall Murders starting from Thursday 27 June 2019. This murder mystery with an ingenious plot is full of wit and very funny scenes.It has been enjoyed by cast, crew and audiences alike and recently celebrated its 100thproduction run. […]

17 Jun 19
The Irish Sun
BRITS with alcohol or drug related offences from decades ago could still find themselves restricted from entering the US due to tougher new visa compliance rules. And immigration lawyers have warned that even social media posts could cause problems. Brits could be turned away at the airport in the US for previous offences The visa rules include any offences – even if they did not lead to any cautions or criminal charges following an arrest. Nita Upadhye, managing attorney at NNU Immigration in London, told the Financial Times that restrictions to enter the US were the worst she had seen in 15 years. She claimed, according to data from US Customs and Border Protection, that people being refused entry to the country had increased by 108 per cent in 2018 compared to 2015. Nita added: “We’re getting inquiries at a rate that we’ve not seen before.” [bc_video video_id=”5852963794001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Need to apply for a travel visa for your upcoming trip? iVisa is a one-stop place to get all the info you need”] While laws have not changed, she explained that the rules have become much stricter with previous convictions being looked at much closer as well as further interrogation by border staff. Earlier this month, it was also announced that visitors to the US would be forced to send over their social media details while applying for a visa. Affecting approximately 15 million tourists a year, the new visa application procedure now requires the applicant to submit all social media account names that have been used within the last five years. Charlotte Slocombe, a partner at immigration law firm Fragomen, added: “When you apply for a visa, the Department of State also googles you. “[Anything suspicious] on your phone or laptop or social media immediately triggers more questioning, which can lead to admissions, which is the same as a conviction.” [boxout headline=”What are the rules for getting a US visa with previous drug or alcohol offences?”]According to the US embassy: “We do not recommend that travellers who have been arrested, even if the arrest did not result in a criminal conviction, have a criminal record,  certain serious communicable illness, have been refused admission into, or have been deported from, the United States, or have previously overstayed under the terms of the Visa Waiver Programme, attempt to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Programme.” The Visa Waiver programme allows Brits to travel to the US for 90 days without a visa, also known as an ESTA. Instead, it is recommended to apply for a visitor visa, or a ‘B visa’, for either a Business (B1) or a Pleasure (B2) trip. However this can still be declined: “In cases where an arrest resulted in a conviction, you may be permanently ineligible to receive a visa and will require a waiver ineligibility to travel to the United States.” [/boxout] [article-rail-section title=”Most read in travel” posts_category=”22″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Isabella Brazier-Jones, from the UK, found out the hard way about the strict new entry rules after admitting she took cocaine in 2017. After a text from a friend was found by border officials, she explained she had done it once before. They then prevented Isabella from boarding and made her return to Britain – as well as banned her from the US for ten years. A British man was also prevented from entering the country and banned for life after texts saying ” I am moving to be near you” were sent to his US girlfriend.
17 Jun 19
The Scottish Sun
BRITS with alcohol or drug related offences from decades ago could still find themselves restricted from entering the US due to tougher new visa compliance rules. And immigration lawyers have warned that even social media posts could cause problems. Brits could be turned away at the airport in the US for previous offences The visa rules include any offences – even if they did not lead to any cautions or criminal charges following an arrest. Nita Upadhye, managing attorney at NNU Immigration in London, told the Financial Times that restrictions to enter the US were the worst she had seen in 15 years. She claimed, according to data from US Customs and Border Protection, that people being refused entry to the country had increased by 108 per cent in 2018 compared to 2015. Nita added: “We’re getting inquiries at a rate that we’ve not seen before.” [bc_video video_id=”5852963794001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Need to apply for a travel visa for your upcoming trip? iVisa is a one-stop place to get all the info you need”] While laws have not changed, she explained that the rules have become much stricter with previous convictions being looked at much closer as well as further interrogation by border staff. Earlier this month, it was also announced that visitors to the US would be forced to send over their social media details while applying for a visa. Affecting approximately 15 million tourists a year, the new visa application procedure now requires the applicant to submit all social media account names that have been used within the last five years. Charlotte Slocombe, a partner at immigration law firm Fragomen, added: “When you apply for a visa, the Department of State also googles you. “[Anything suspicious] on your phone or laptop or social media immediately triggers more questioning, which can lead to admissions, which is the same as a conviction.” [boxout headline=”What are the rules for getting a US visa with previous drug or alcohol offences?”]According to the US embassy: “We do not recommend that travellers who have been arrested, even if the arrest did not result in a criminal conviction, have a criminal record,  certain serious communicable illness, have been refused admission into, or have been deported from, the United States, or have previously overstayed under the terms of the Visa Waiver Programme, attempt to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Programme.” The Visa Waiver programme allows Brits to travel to the US for 90 days without a visa, also known as an ESTA. Instead, it is recommended to apply for a visitor visa, or a ‘B visa’, for either a Business (B1) or a Pleasure (B2) trip. However this can still be declined: “In cases where an arrest resulted in a conviction, you may be permanently ineligible to receive a visa and will require a waiver ineligibility to travel to the United States.” [/boxout] [article-rail-section title=”Most read in travel” posts_category=”33″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Isabella Brazier-Jones, from the UK, found out the hard way about the strict new entry rules after admitting she took cocaine in 2017. After a text from a friend was found by border officials, she explained she had done it once before. They then prevented Isabella from boarding and made her return to Britain – as well as banned her from the US for ten years. A British man was also prevented from entering the country and banned for life after texts saying ” I am moving to be near you” were sent to his US girlfriend.
17 Jun 19
The Sun
BRITS with alcohol or drug related offences from decades ago could still find themselves restricted from entering the US due to tougher new visa compliance rules. And immigration lawyers have warned that even social media posts could cause problems. Brits could be turned away at the airport in the US for previous offences The visa rules include any offences – even if they did not lead to any cautions or criminal charges following an arrest. Nita Upadhye, managing attorney at NNU Immigration in London, told the Financial Times that restrictions to enter the US were the worst she had seen in 15 years. She claimed, according to data from US Customs and Border Protection, that people being refused entry to the country had increased by 108 per cent in 2018 compared to 2015. Nita added: “We’re getting inquiries at a rate that we’ve not seen before.” [bc_video video_id=”5852963794001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Need to apply for a travel visa for your upcoming trip? iVisa is a one-stop place to get all the info you need”] While laws have not changed, she explained that the rules have become much stricter with previous convictions being looked at much closer as well as further interrogation by border staff. Earlier this month, it was also announced that visitors to the US would be forced to send over their social media details while applying for a visa. Affecting approximately 15 million tourists a year, the new visa application procedure now requires the applicant to submit all social media account names that have been used within the last five years. Charlotte Slocombe, a partner at immigration law firm Fragomen, added: “When you apply for a visa, the Department of State also googles you. “[Anything suspicious] on your phone or laptop or social media immediately triggers more questioning, which can lead to admissions, which is the same as a conviction.” [boxout headline=”What are the rules for getting a US visa with previous drug or alcohol offences?”]According to the US embassy: “We do not recommend that travellers who have been arrested, even if the arrest did not result in a criminal conviction, have a criminal record,  certain serious communicable illness, have been refused admission into, or have been deported from, the United States, or have previously overstayed under the terms of the Visa Waiver Programme, attempt to travel visa free under the Visa Waiver Programme.” The Visa Waiver programme allows Brits to travel to the US for 90 days without a visa, also known as an ESTA. Instead, it is recommended to apply for a visitor visa, or a ‘B visa’, for either a Business (B1) or a Pleasure (B2) trip. However this can still be declined: “In cases where an arrest resulted in a conviction, you may be permanently ineligible to receive a visa and will require a waiver ineligibility to travel to the United States.” [/boxout] [article-rail-section title=”Most read in travel” posts_category=”324″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Isabella Brazier-Jones, from the UK, found out the hard way about the strict new entry rules after admitting she took cocaine in 2017. After a text from a friend was found by border officials, she explained she had done it once before. They then prevented Isabella from boarding and made her return to Britain – as well as banned her from the US for ten years. A British man was also prevented from entering the country and banned for life after texts saying ” I am moving to be near you” were sent to his US girlfriend.
17 Jun 19
News Archives Uk

Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are celebrating Father's Day as a family, despite the criminal charges brought against them. The Full House star and her fashion designer husband are currently in an ongoing legal battle for their involvement in the college admissions scandal, nicknamed "Operation Varsity Blues." Both Loughlin and Giannulli are facing […]

17 Jun 19

Stepsister by Jennifer Donnelly is a YA novel that tells the story of what happens to her ugly stepsisters after Cinderella puts on the glass slipper and lives happily ever after. When Isabella’s deception to cut off her toes to fit the glass slipper and win the prince is discovered, the shame she receives is no […]

17 Jun 19
North Carolina Credit Repair | (877) 481-3950

Sw 26th Ct Topeka, Kansas Free Consumer Credit Counseling Service call (888) 551-1270 Credit Repair, Bankruptcy Counseling, Foreclosure Prevention, Student Loan Debt Consolidation, Wage Garnishment and Vehicle Repossession solutions, Mortgage Loan M… Tags: Sw 26th Ct Topeka Kansas Consumer Credit Counseling Service | (888) 551-1270 from Credit Background Check | (866) 793-7049: Isabella, Minnesota Free […]

17 Jun 19
Who are we as Australians?

By Isabella Clarke and Emily Montgomery Who are we as Australians? ~ Ideas Accurate Ideas: Largely ranged past events, strong culture, fearless towards protecting cultural beliefs, countless hero’s, we appreciate our culture and the freedom of the country also our advantages as being a developed country, passionate about culture and what complies of it. Stereotypical […]