J Mclaughlin

22 Apr 19
The Other Side

Today was the first time I was in here and I loved it! First their window display changes alot and I like how they used the color green. It wasn’t over done or too much. It felt like spring and you could get that feeling easily from the window. I liked all the colors the […]

22 Apr 19
Dolled Up

This was another eye catching window in the downtown Naperville area. I thought the display was super cute and loved the way they incorporated props with the mannequins. I think anyone who passes by would stop and stare! The window overall just has a sense of elegance all while being extremely cohesive. The window is […]

21 Apr 19
East Bay Times
The video, a little over six minutes long, has been viewed more than 100 million times. It tells the story of Eric O’Grey, who, facing a grim prognosis from his doctor due to a slew of weight-related health problems, got some intriguing advice from a nutritionist. The prescription: a shelter dog. O’Grey goes on to adopt Peety, a middle-age dog who had developed arthritis after being confined in a backyard, and the two transform together. O’Grey loses more than 140 lbs and runs a marathon. Peety loses some weight, too, and the two live happily together until Peety passes away at an old age.The video premiered on Valentine’s Day of 2016. It was the first project of the newly formed Mutual Rescue initiative from Humane Society Silicon Valley, a campaign aimed at creating nationwide awareness for the mutual benefits of pet adoption. Since then, the group has produced several more testimonial videos, which have amassed more than 53 million views altogether. Now, Mutual Rescue founder and Humane Society President Carol Novello has published a book, the proceeds from which will go directly to her organization. The book, “Mutual Rescue: How Adopting a Homeless Animal Can Save You, Too,” came out April 9. It weaves true accounts of people and their rescue pets together with research on the benefits of interspecies bonding. The aim of the book, Novello said, is to add fact-based evidence to support the anecdotes. When Novello moved from her senior executive position in the tech world to her role as Humane Society president, she was often asked a frustrating question: “Why are you helping animals when you could be helping people?” Novello knew that of the $410 billion Americans donate to charitable causes, less than 3 percent goes to animal-related groups. “People have a perception that supporting animal welfare takes away resources from helping humans,” Novello said. “I want people to understand that helping animals can be part of helping people.” Wanting to get this point across to people in a compelling way, Novello got in contact in 2015 with David Whitman, executive producer at The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose. Whitman suggested profiling real people’s stories on video. He also coined the phrase “mutual rescue.” They began with the story of Eric and Peety, which Novello had been recounting in her public talks for a while, and based on the video’s reception, they knew the initiative had the potential to teach national audiences about the interdependence of animal and human welfare. The idea for the book came before the plan for the videos. Novello said she wanted to create the “21st-century version of ‘Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul.’” About three years ago, she connected with New York Times bestselling author Marci Shimoff at a writing workshop, and Shimoff connected Novello with an agent and a writing partner, Jenny Graves. After a lengthy planning, writing and auctioning process, Novello said she is excited for the book to be out in the world. In addition to sharing other people’s stories, Novello talks about her personal experiences with rescue pets in the book. She remembers growing up in a house full of cats, much to her father’s chagrin. That is, until one day a cat named Chester came along and turned Novello’s father into a believer. “It’s so easy to stereotype animals, people and situations,” Novello said. “It’s really by engaging at an individual level that you find out what someone’s about. Chester didn’t change my dad’s mind by having a conversation with him; he changed his mind by being so open-hearted.” Novello has continued to surround herself with animals in her adult life. About a month ago, she lost her rescue shepherd Tess, who is pictured with her on the book flap. While she mourns the loss, she is grateful she gets to tell Tess’s story in the book. But her home is by no means empty at the moment, as she has two tuxedo rescue cats named Bode (“a total knucklehead”) and Herbie (“a definite lovebug”). She finds all of her rescue animals at the Humane Society. Novello was scheduled to be at the J. McLaughlin Store (17½ N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos) Thursday, April 25, 4-8 p.m., and at Humane Society Silicon Valley (901 Ames Ave., Milpitas) Thursday, May 2, 3-6 p.m.
21 Apr 19
The Mercury News
The video, a little over six minutes long, has been viewed more than 100 million times. It tells the story of Eric O’Grey, who, facing a grim prognosis from his doctor due to a slew of weight-related health problems, got some intriguing advice from a nutritionist. The prescription: a shelter dog. O’Grey goes on to adopt Peety, a middle-age dog who had developed arthritis after being confined in a backyard, and the two transform together. O’Grey loses more than 140 lbs and runs a marathon. Peety loses some weight, too, and the two live happily together until Peety passes away at an old age.The video premiered on Valentine’s Day of 2016. It was the first project of the newly formed Mutual Rescue initiative from Humane Society Silicon Valley, a campaign aimed at creating nationwide awareness for the mutual benefits of pet adoption. Since then, the group has produced several more testimonial videos, which have amassed more than 53 million views altogether. Now, Mutual Rescue founder and Humane Society President Carol Novello has published a book, the proceeds from which will go directly to her organization. The book, “Mutual Rescue: How Adopting a Homeless Animal Can Save You, Too,” came out April 9. It weaves true accounts of people and their rescue pets together with research on the benefits of interspecies bonding. The aim of the book, Novello said, is to add fact-based evidence to support the anecdotes. When Novello moved from her senior executive position in the tech world to her role as Humane Society president, she was often asked a frustrating question: “Why are you helping animals when you could be helping people?” Novello knew that of the $410 billion Americans donate to charitable causes, less than 3 percent goes to animal-related groups. “People have a perception that supporting animal welfare takes away resources from helping humans,” Novello said. “I want people to understand that helping animals can be part of helping people.” Wanting to get this point across to people in a compelling way, Novello got in contact in 2015 with David Whitman, executive producer at The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose. Whitman suggested profiling real people’s stories on video. He also coined the phrase “mutual rescue.” They began with the story of Eric and Peety, which Novello had been recounting in her public talks for a while, and based on the video’s reception, they knew the initiative had the potential to teach national audiences about the interdependence of animal and human welfare. The idea for the book came before the plan for the videos. Novello said she wanted to create the “21st-century version of ‘Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul.’” About three years ago, she connected with New York Times bestselling author Marci Shimoff at a writing workshop, and Shimoff connected Novello with an agent and a writing partner, Jenny Graves. After a lengthy planning, writing and auctioning process, Novello said she is excited for the book to be out in the world. In addition to sharing other people’s stories, Novello talks about her personal experiences with rescue pets in the book. She remembers growing up in a house full of cats, much to her father’s chagrin. That is, until one day a cat named Chester came along and turned Novello’s father into a believer. “It’s so easy to stereotype animals, people and situations,” Novello said. “It’s really by engaging at an individual level that you find out what someone’s about. Chester didn’t change my dad’s mind by having a conversation with him; he changed his mind by being so open-hearted.” Novello has continued to surround herself with animals in her adult life. About a month ago, she lost her rescue shepherd Tess, who is pictured with her on the book flap. While she mourns the loss, she is grateful she gets to tell Tess’s story in the book. But her home is by no means empty at the moment, as she has two tuxedo rescue cats named Bode (“a total knucklehead”) and Herbie (“a definite lovebug”). She finds all of her rescue animals at the Humane Society. Novello was scheduled to be at the J. McLaughlin Store (17½ N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos) Thursday, April 25, 4-8 p.m., and at Humane Society Silicon Valley (901 Ames Ave., Milpitas) Thursday, May 2, 3-6 p.m.
20 Apr 19
Alison Price's Critical Research Journal for Falmouth University MA Photography

ADAMS, A. with M. STREET ALINDER. 1985 Ansel Adams – An Autobiography, New York: Little Brown and Company. APPLEYARD, B.  2019. The Stain of War. Sunday Times Magazine, 27 January 2019. Artfix Daily. 2017. Becoming Forest by Helen Sear, New York: Klompching Gallery. BADGER, Gerry, Meetings with Unremarkable Trees – The Photography of Paul Hart […]

20 Apr 19
Carolina Girl Living

  Growing up Charleston was my second home.  My Mom’s family lives there and has for generations.  So when Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter, or the summer rolled around, I’d find myself in a car headed to Charleston.  There is something special about the low country.  It is like this warm familiar embrace.  A feeling of peace […]

20 Apr 19
Pisaries Creator

Quote from Kurt Vonnegut: “Being a humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead.” This ID (Investigation Discovery) show recreates crimes in between the 1920s and 1970s.  It is told by the viewpoint of someone living during that time period as well as those involved in the […]

19 Apr 19
PhillyLacrosse.com

Phillylacrosse.com, Posted 4/18/19 Haverford School 9, Radnor 6 Haverford Brennan McBride 3g, 1a Adam Salvaggio 2g, 2a Mac Costin 2g Jack Leary 2a Gavin Burke 2g Sage Garito 4 saves Overall 10 faceoff wins Radnor Jackson Birtwistle – 2 goals and 1 assist Drew Brown – 1 goal and 1 assist Damien Ramondo – 1 […]

18 Apr 19
East Bay Times
ALAMEDA The Alameda Community Chorus, aka “Alameda Sings,” invites the public to their spring concert, “Alameda Sings! Opus To Life, A Collection of Music and Harmony” at 7:30 p.m. April 26. This free family-friendly concert will be in a new venue at Christ Episcopal Church, 1700 Santa Clara Ave. in  Alameda. The program will highlight the musical versatility of the chorus and be led by Artistic Director Kathryn Neale Manalo and accompanied on piano by Dale Tsang. The performance will open with a sing-a-long featured at “The Big Sing” and travel through various genres that include “Oseh Shalom”, “A Jubilant Song” and “Opus One” and will end with Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “This Is Me” from the “Greatest Showman”. The Alameda Community Chorus is a 501(c)3 nonprofit that “engages the community in advancing the love of choral music through education, performance and collaboration.” For more information, please call 510-219-6862 or visit alamedachorus.com. — Alameda Community Chorus City’s average electric rate going up 2.5 percent in July Electric rates will change on July 1 in the city of Alameda. At its regular meeting April 15, the city’s Public Utilities Board approved a 2.5 percent overall average rate increase for residential and commercial customers. Alameda Municipal Power’s (AMP) rates will still average about 16.5 percent lower than those in neighboring communities, saving Alamedans a total of $12 million. A typical residential customer with an average bill of $63 can expect to see an increase of $2 to his or her monthly bill. By comparison, PG&E’s average electric bill in neighboring communities is $76. The percentage of the increase will vary depending on the customer’s rate class. Residential customers will see an increase of up to 2.9 percent. As a community-owned and locally operated electric system, AMP does not make a profit on rates. The revenue from electric sales goes toward operation of the system and then to the community through annual transfers of $5.5 million to the city’s general fund for valuable community services. AMP offers a variety of programs and services for customers who are in­terested in understanding their energy use or who are having trouble paying their utility bills. Visit alamedamp.com to find more information on AMP’s rates and how to manage energy usage. — AMP Sign up for Alameda Boys & Girls Club summer camps The Alameda Boys & Girls Club (ABGC) will host its annual ‘Sunrise Club’ Summer Day Camp for youth ages 6 to 12 from June 10 through Aug. 16 at a cost of $80 to $100 a week. At 1900 Third St. in Alameda, ABGC will provide kids with unique activities inspired by fun weekly themes and provide daily breakfast and lunch to all attendees. Themes will include Around the World, Decade Week and All Things Local. Four field trips will occur, including a trip to the Oakland Zoo, Chabot Space & Science Center, Academy of Sciences and California’s Great America. During Sunrise Club Summer Day Camp, members will participate in many fun and impactful activities like gardening, arts and crafts, coding, cooking, physical recreation, photography, graphic design and more. All participating youth must be or become registered ABGC members, and a one-year membership costs $100. The mission of the Alameda Boys & Girls Club is to inspire and enable all youth especially those who need us most, to realize their full potential as productive, caring and responsible citizens. To sign up visit alamedabgc.org/2019-summer-camps. — Alameda Boys & Girls Club NYT bestselling author Carr sets her new novel on Island New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Robyn Carr has set her latest novel in Alameda. “The View From Alameda Island” tackles the heartbreak of divorce and the life-changing freedom of new beginnings with raw emotion, candor and a good dose of humor and romance along the way. A popular romance and women’s fiction writer, Carr is the author of more than 50 novels that have sold more than 28 million copies worldwide. She has written 11 No. 1 New York Times bestsellers, and her “Virgin River” series is being adapted by Netflix. Carr chose Alameda as the setting for her new book in part because her public relations team (Sarah Burningham and Claire McLaughlin of Little Bird Publicity) is based in town and she has since fallen in love with the Island. Carr will appear in Books Inc. Alameda at 7 p.m. May 2 to sign books and discuss “The View From Alameda Island,” which is available at Bay Area bookstores, on Amazon and at robyncarr.com. — MIRA Books New 12-step sex addiction recovery meetings available There’s a new 12-step meeting available in the East Bay for those who seek to recover from sexual addiction. The meeting’s name is First Things First, and it’s a part of the international, 12-Step recovery program Sexual Compulsives Anonymous (SCA). First Things First will meet for an hour starting at 7:15 p.m. Wednesdays in an open, round-robin discussion format at First Congregational Church of Alameda, 1912 Central Ave. (at Chestnut Street), in the Miracle Room on the second floor. For more information, visit bayareane.ws/2vasmOg[cq comment=”sca-recovery.org/WP/meetings/first-things-first-alameda-san-francisco-bay-area/?tsml-day=any&tsml-region=san-francisco”]. — First Things First, Alameda
18 Apr 19
CHESMONTSPORTS.COM

Coatesville 8, Unionville 5 – Kayla Bock hammered a three-run home run in the top of the seventh inning to snap a 5-5 tie and carry the Red Raiders to the Ches-Mont League crossover win Wednesday. Payton Landis finished with three hits and two RBI for Coatesville, which also got two hits each from Bock, […]

18 Apr 19
Princess Style Diaries

One of the prettiest and most upscale areas to go in Boca Raton, Florida is Mizner Park. I’ve been there several times recently including every day this past weekend, and each day I have had a tremendous time there enjoying the beauty of the area, shopping at the many different stores there, dining at their […]

17 Apr 19
The Denver Post
After Notre Dame, build cathedrals of compassion Re: “Notre Dame in flames,” April 16 news story From the ashes of Notre-Dame de Paris, we believers and admirers can commit to building new cathedrals of compassion that may take as long to build, and last as long as a millennium. If you have lived over the turn of the millennium, I’m urging us to understand what a privilege it is. I’m afraid 9/11/01 has arrested us Americans. Let us pick up our wounded and walk. Don’t hunker down or bunker up, become paralyzed by grief and genuine loss. Start living cathedrals of compassion, made of living stones. Dennis Kennedy, Longmont Dear France, On behalf of the American majority that didn’t vote for President Donald Trump, please accept our apology for having to take the time in the midst of one of your most dire emergencies to explain to Trump why his advice to “use flying water tankers” would most likely have caused further destruction to your beloved Notre Dame Cathedral. And thank you for being so kind as to Tweet back in English so even he could read it. With great sadness for your devastating loss, Cynthia Stone, Denver CU Regents’ pick for president proves divisive Re: “Regents: Kennedy for president,” April 11 news story As a student at a large state university in the 1970s, I never knew the political views of our school president, and didn’t care. The fact that he was of a different race from me and most of my fellow students was also irrelevant. All that mattered was his effective leadership of the university. It’s time to move beyond identity politics. Roger Linfield, Boulder Regents did not do their homework. The selection of an ultra-right candidate to become the next president of the University of Colorado proves many of the flaws in higher education. Our public universities have become massive corporate companies, geared first and foremost to profit and obscene wealth derived on the backs of tuition and taxes. Students and taxpayers come last. The mere fact that the basic foundations for supporting a liberal, humanist education and promoting civic responsibility would fall prey to the selection of executives and administrators who staunchly favor denying women the right to make their own reproductive healthcare decisions is abhorrent. No better, the finalist to become the next president of CU has a lifelong public record of supporting industry and war that in turn always has and always will lead to pollution and destruction. For a university that claims its mission is grounded in research for the strength and character of undergraduate education, the CU Regents did not do their own research. Jeffery Moser, Aurora There weren’t tax cuts or tax increases for everyone Re: “Colorado stole your Trump tax cut,” April 14 Jon Caldera column Caldera cherry-picked impacts of Trump’s tax on Colorado residents to, as usual, bash Democrats. That ill conceived and rushed Trump tax cut had many unintended consequences on the states, but not all of them hurt Colorado taxpayers. Raising the standard deduction on the federal return pushed many in Colorado to claim a standard deduction. And, they were then pleasantly surprised when they did not have to add back several thousands of dollars of state taxes paid to their federal taxable income to get to their state taxable income. Try to show a modicum of fair analysis, Jon. Bruce Glenn, Littleton My income went up $5,000 last year, but my taxes went up $3,000. So much for a tax cut. It’s a tax scam! Larry McLaughlin, Aurora Kick out the kids of admissions cheaters If a parent pled, guilty to bribing a DMV employee in order to get their child a drivers license, one would expect that license to be revoked. The child can apply again properly. Shouldn’t the same reasoning apply to the admissions scandal? Immediate expulsion and you are welcome to apply again properly. Joseph J. Sejut, Denver