Jack Lowden

14 Dec 18
The Sports Daily

WWE Superstar Paige is one of the most popular talents to ever work in the women’s division. Before the Women’s Revolution transformed the company, Paige was working her way up the ladder with highly physical matches while sporting her own unique style in the process. Now the story of Paige’s life is coming to the […]

14 Dec 18
BYT // Brightest Young Things

Historically misleading, and with weak performances

14 Dec 18
Latest Entertainment News | Top Celebrity News, Hollywood Headlines

“Mary Queen of Scots” director Josie Rourke has explained her decision to zoom in on Saoirse Ronan’s face in a scene in which she receives oral sex. Ronan, who plays the Scottish Queen, gets pleasured by her cousin Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley (played by Jack Lowden), in the film, and the scene already has people […]

14 Dec 18
Boston Herald
MOVIE REVIEW “MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS” Rated R. At Kendall Square Cinema, AMC Loews Boston Common and Coolidge Corner Theatre. Grade: B- I’m sure that Mary Queen of Scots was more than the badly married, scheming pain in the neck we see portrayed by Saoirse Ronan in “Mary Queen of Scots.” Directed by Josie Rourke, who has been the artistic director of the Donmar Warehouse theater in London’s Covent Garden since 2012, the film, co-starring Margot Robbie as Queen Elizabeth I, was scripted by Beau Willimon (“House of Cards”) based on a book by historian John Guy. It’s often like the Tudor version of “Mean Girls.” In opening scenes, Mary and her retinue, including retainers of African and Asian descent, arrive at Edinburgh Castle in 1561, where they set up residence. If you haven’t brushed up on the history of the period, you may have trouble keeping up. Mary Queen of Scots aka Mary Stuart is the Catholic cousin of Elizabeth I, Queen of England and Ireland, and the daughter of the late King James of Scotland. Mary was the queen consort of France and once claimed to be the rightful heir to Elizabeth’s throne and considered such by English Catholics. Ensconced in windy Edinburgh, Mary is reunited with her illegitimate half-brother James Stewart (James McArdle) and soon marries Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley (Jack Lowden), who is a drunkard and gay. Mary, nevertheless, gets pregnant. For her part, the beautiful Elizabeth, who will suffer from smallpox and be severely scarred, canoodles with man-candy Robert Dudley (Joe Alwyn, much better in the “other” period film of the moment, “The Favourite”). Elizabeth, however, never marries and does not provide an heir to her throne. She does, on the other hand, reign for a very long time, while her make-up gets whiter and her wigs redder, until she looks more clown than crown. Intrigues are hatched. Elizabeth, who says she is “more man than woman,” is rightfully paranoid about Mary, who wants to be named Elizabeth’s successor. Scotland’s Protestants led by John Knox (David Tennant) detest “Papist” Mary. Hating them back, Mary plots. In a scene that is fiction, the royal relatives meet and refer to each other insincerely as “sister,” and they are in many ways real and spiritual doppelgangers and mirror images, although they should certainly never be left alone together, again. Most of us know this is going to end badly and for whom. Queen Elizabeth has been played on the screen by Bette Davis, Judi Dench, Miranda Richardson, Cate Blanchett, who has played her twice, and others (Quentin Crisp, anyone?). Of course, there was the 1971 “Mary, Queen of Scots” with the comma and powerhouses Vanessa Redgrave and Glenda Jackson. Watching “Mary Queen of Scots,” I found myself more impressed with the wardrobe (Tudor fanny packs?), beards and wigs than the many schemes, romances and plots. Seldom has such a monumental game of thrones seemed so plodding. Robbie and Ronan are both prisoners of the coiffures, costumes and dialogue. Screenwriter Willimon, who has established himself as a political dramatist (his credits include George Clooney’s 2011 contemporary drama “The Ides of March”), has written a film that has the look of history, but little of the sweep, grandeur or fun. Paging Blackadder. (“Mary Queen of Scots” contains sexually suggestive scenes and violence.)
13 Dec 18
Michael J. Cinema

The year is 1561, and Mary Stuart has returned to Scotland. Spending most of her childhood in France, Mary (Saoirse Ronan) has decided to come home and claim her throne, the very one her half-brother, James (James McArdle) has been keeping warm in her absence. Maybe too warm, as Mary soon find out. But this […]

13 Dec 18
Twin Cities
If Academy Awards went to locations, Scotland would be a shoo-in for “Mary Queen of Scots.” The sweep of the Scottish Highlands is breathtaking in the historical drama starring Saoirse Ronan as Mary and Margot Robbie as her nemesis and “sister queen” Elizabeth I — even more so when juxtaposed against the dark and cramped interiors of castles, abbeys and other structures that are often too full of people (i.e., men) trying to advise either sovereign. The movie kicks off with 18-year-old Mary returning to Scotland after her husband, the French king, has died. Married barely two years, Mary is in no hurry to wed again and proclaims long and loudly that she won’t be pressured into any match, unless Elizabeth promises that Mary will succeed the English queen if she dies without an heir. Mary has a legitimate claim on Elizabeth’s throne, but Elizabeth isn’t going down without a fight. She even dangles before Mary her own true love, Robert Dudley (Joe Alwyn, who also starred in “The Favourite,” a new film about Queen Anne’s court and its vicissitudes). If he marries Mary, his status clinches the throne for England because he’s somehow in line for succession, too. It seems just about everybody has a claim on the throne, and there’s much ado about marriage. I confess it got a little tiresome and confusing trying to keep straight who should hook up with whom and what the outcome would be. But it all starts to come together after Mary chooses a spouse. And what a doozy Henry, Lord Darnley (Jack Lowden), turns out to be. It’s never a good sign when a lady-in-waiting notes how little a queen knows her fiance. After their marriage, the crosses and double-crosses come fast and furious and the inevitable march to Mary’s fate quickens. (If you don’t know what happens to Mary, Queen of Scots, I won’t spoil it for you.) Through it all, Ronan stands strong as Mary, exhibiting the steadfastness needed to rule. She is earnest as the refreshingly open-minded sovereign of the 1500s (Mary granted freedom of religion in Scotland). And Mary’s passion for her native land burns in Ronan’s eyes. You believe Ronan could lead. Robbie is Ronan’s equal in credibility, but her strength is showing the vulnerability beneath a ruler’s steely exterior. Her Elizabeth yearns for the things women of her time were expected to do, marry and have children. But she knows she can’t or her whole life will be compromised. She chooses the life of a man, she says. But that doesn’t stop the undercurrent of want, which is nicely demonstrated in scenes of Mary giving birth crosscut with scenes of Elizabeth creating a work of paper curling with the color of blood as a motif. [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”]There is violence here, but little of it has to do with war — although there is a battle sequence. “Mary Queen of Scots” is first and foremost a movie about formidable women, and the movie keeps its focus on Mary and Elizabeth, what they mean to each other and what that means in a world of men. And for the good of country. “Mary Queen of Scots” Directed by: Josie Rourke Starring: Saoirse Ronan, Margot Robbie, Guy Pearce, Joe Alwyn, David Tennant Rated: R for violence and sexuality. Should you go? It will take a little patience but it’s worth it. 3 stars
13 Dec 18
Down The Rabbit Hole

In the past couple of months, the Donmar Theatre have been working with a very interesting concept for their production of Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure. The play itself has been majorly reduced, in order to fit it all into the first half of the performance, before then being re-performed but with two characters’ switched, and the […]

13 Dec 18
1to1only

Saoirse Ronan and Jack Lowden play royal lovers in the new film Mary Queen of Scots 121only – Celebrity News #celebritynews

13 Dec 18
Drive In Magazine

BBC One has unveiled the trailer for three-part Andrea Levy adaptation The Long Song. Set to premiere on Tuesday December 18th, The Long Song is set during the final days of slavery in 19th century Jamaica and tells the story of the strong-willed, young slave July on a plantation owned by her odious mistress Caroline […]

12 Dec 18
CJ @ the Movies

I’m not sure how accurate “Mary Queen of Scots” is, based on the characters, race, and narrative. Did Mary Stuart have an African American ambassador? Did Queen Elizabeth have an Asian Lady in Waiting? First-time director Josie Rourke believes in diversity, and refuses to cast an all-white cast. I’ve heard various stories about Mary Stuart, […]

12 Dec 18
News Archives Uk

YoutubeUniversal pictures Mary Queen of the Scots Star Saoirse Ronan has explained why her character's oral sex scene is "so important." The new film, starring Ronan as a historical titular character and Margot Robbie as Elizabeth Tudor, features an oral sex scene in which Henry (Jack Lowden) enjoys Mary in ways that can not lead […]