Jacob Co

16 Dec 18
The Good Fight

This was the fight card I was looking forward to this weekend.  With HBO bowing out from their role as the leader in high level boxing broadcasting the question is who will step up and fill the void?  Well the new online streaming platform, DAZN, signalled their intent by splashing out a ridiculous amount of […]

16 Dec 18
Parlay Game

After a very eventful tournament, Roger Chapman won in play-off the final of the Staysure Tour. A circuit that the British Paul Broadhurst has completed for the second time in first place.After a first stop played last week in Mauritius, the island of Praslin in Seychelles hosted this week the second round of the final […]

16 Dec 18
The Faithful Questioner

Several weeks ago, I was asked to speak in sacrament meeting on the principle of tithing.  Most people probably don’t think tithing is all that exciting of a topic – I joked that perhaps the only one perceived as less exciting was home teaching and that got the axe.  I was actually excited to talk […]

16 Dec 18
Truth2Freedom's Blog

Hope Is Established by Love See how great a love the Father has bestowed on us, that we would be called children of God; and such we are. For this reason the world does not know us, because it did not know Him. (3:1) John was overcome with wonder by the fact that sinners by […]

16 Dec 18
The Toy Box Suburban Farm

In the beginning, God created man from the dust of the ground; but the woman was made from the strength that protects the heart, the rib.

16 Dec 18
UltraSports.TV

Although Fielding has sped out quicker than he was in getting destroyed by Callum Smith from the 1st round in 2015,” Rocky considers that Canelo is the best fighter he’s ever tangled with during his livelihood. You’ve got to sacrifice Fielding credit so you can get up each time. Fielding never looked hurt. Was a […]

16 Dec 18
DhananJay Parkhe º Public Speaker Mentor

This is the brainpickings.org weekly digest by Maria Popova. If you missed last week’s edition — Anne Lamott on forgiveness, self-forgiveness, and the relationship between brokenness and joy, Nabokov on wonder, artists celebrate the love of books — you can catch up right here. And if you’re enjoying this newsletter, please consider supporting my labor of love with […]

16 Dec 18
Wyo4News

  All those who are pictured are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of information posted on this website. However, Wyo4News does not guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of the content. Names may be similar or identical to other individuals. For the latest […]

16 Dec 18
Quartz
If you ever stopped at a street-side pharmacy, almost anywhere in Nigeria, and looked down the shelves you’ll find, probably between the nondescript packets of tablets for the common cold and malaria fever, the distinctive white and red sachets for a local medicine called Alabukun Powder. Nigerians who use the drug are convinced it cures almost every ailment from minor headaches, fevers and pains to battling chronic rheumatism and arthritis. Medically speaking, Alabukun powder is an analgesic but it’s used in local traditional herbal medicine concoctions as commonly as it is used in modern medicine in Nigeria. The Alabukun brand is one of the longest-running, indigenous pharmaceutical brands in Africa, gaining widespread use over the last 100 years and become part of Nigerian fabric, without significant marketing or advertising budgets in recent decades. It can also be found in stalls and pharmacies in neighboring West African countries and even in local stores of migrant-heavy neighborhoods in the United Kingdom. It’s a remarkable achievement because there are few indigenous Nigerian consumer brands of any sort that had made it this far and wide—and lasted 100 years. Alabukun Powder in a roadside shop in Keffi, Nigeria – Uwagbale Edward-Ekpu Alabukun was founded by a Nigerian pharmacy apprentice and entrepreneur, Jacob Sogboyega Odulate in 1918, a period when Aspirin-caffeine (headache) powder brands were just starting to spring up in the United States. The year was also at  the peak of colonial control in Nigeria (today’s country was just created in 1914). There was no modern pharmaceutical industry and only a few western drugs were imported and distributed in the country by European companies. Though there was already Aspirin, a drug discovered in 1897, in the market, Nigerians barely had access to western drugs and most people only knew of traditional local medication based on herbs. Odulate, born in 1884 in Lagos, was armed with a basic knowledge of European pharmaceutical products and medical care acquired locally as a pharmacy apprentice in Abeokuta, introduced his own brand of Aspirin-caffeine powder to the locals and went ahead to make sure it was always available and affordable to them. Odulate who was nicknamed by locals as Alabukun (Blessed Jacob), started producing what would become Alabukun powder from local materials and imported patent drugs which he imported from the United Kingdom through a British company, called Ayrton Saunders & Co. based in Liverpool. Odulate also established a retail chain called “Alabukun Patent Medicine Supply Stores” and sold patent drugs. He also ran a clinic where he attended to minor injuries and wounds. Today, a sachet of Alabukun powder contains 760 mg of acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) and 60 mg of caffeine. Its powder form means, when compared to tablets, it dissolves faster and therefore works faster.  Most people mix it with water but its also mixed with everything from soda drinks to gin. By the sachet Since Aspirin is an analgesic used for deep pains, fever, inflammation and blood clotting when combined with caffeine its potency is increased and it can be used for treating migraines. Aspirin—and therefore Alabukun powder—works by inhibiting the production of the body chemicals, prostaglandins which is responsible for inducing pain, fever and inflammation, and thromboxane which is responsible for blood clotting in the body. Locals have long awarded many real and mythical qualities to the medicine from the simple, like curing terrible hangovers to the more unsettling like a medicinal recipe found online of Alabukun, 7UP and dry gin which the author claimed could help terminate pregnancies. But the success and longevity of Alabukun powder is a really a result of the marketing and sales distribution ingenuity of Blessed Jacob. First, he ensured his product was easily accessible to the locals right from the start by placing his first drug stall close to a street market. He also localized his products by giving them his already popular Yoruba nickname, Alabukun, and added his picture on his products, taking advantage of his reputation as respected medicine man to gain the trust of customers. Nigerians took to it quickly. They were already familiar with traditional drugs in powder form and even used the Alabukun powder alongside traditional herbal medicines. He marketed his brand far and wide using the “Alabukun Almanac” in which he identified numerous medications for diverse ailments. It’s worth noting another of Alabukun’s marketing and distribution strengths has also been its appeal to low income Nigerians as it can often be sold quite cheaply by the sachet in local stores or even street hawkers. Typically, a single sachet sells for 80 naira (25 cents) and a pack usually holds 10 sachets.  It’s a lesson global consumer product giants like Unilever and P&G learned in numerous African markets decades later. To reach low-income customers fast-moving consumer goods often have to be sold in much smaller, conveniently-priced packages than they would be in wealthier economies. Alabukun was effectively doing this right from the start in its home market. The scale of these achievements hadn’t been duly recognized or documented until his daughter, Folake Solanke, herself a much-accomplished, veteran lawyer told part of his story in her autobiography, Reaching for the Stars (2007).The Nobel Laureate and author, Wole Soyinka remembers growing up around this enterprise, as a young boy. Soyinka wrote about Blessed Jacob, his medicine store and an Alabukun Almanac of 1938 in his memoir, Ake: The Years of Childhood. At the time of Jacobs’s death in 1962, he had already firmly established the Alabukun brand in the south-western part of Nigeria and was a wealthy man with real estate around the region. Sign up to the Quartz Africa Weekly Brief here for news and analysis on African business, tech and innovation in your inbox
16 Dec 18
Fallon Brown

Well, it’s been a week. Sunday we had the kids’ Christmas part at the Moose lodge we’re members of. Handled that. Then, Wednesday night we had another Christmas party for the kids at the fire station. Didn’t handle that so well. Part of the reason is the way the social hall is constructed, noise just […]

16 Dec 18
RSS News

Despite an economy that has fully recovered from the worst recession since the Great Depression, many Ohio communities are lagging. Research has shown that the recovery has been clustered around the most prosperous areas of the country. Look no further than the boundary between Marion and Delaware counties to see where the Ohio and U.S. economies […]

16 Dec 18
KNOWING THE TIME, because what's coming matters

  Christmas: Pagan Or Kosher? By ONE FOR ISRAEL (Messianic Jews In Israel) December 25th: A joyful day to celebrate the Messiah coming to earth… or a hijacked pagan holiday? Does the date really matter? And how did it become 25th December anyway, since Yeshua most likely came during the Fall Feasts? Every year the level […]