Jaycee

25 Apr 19
The Burning Couch

By Brian Comer FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 25, 2019 WVU CLUB BASEBALL IS HEADED TO JOHNSTOWN, PA MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The West Virginia University Club Baseball team is headed to the New Penn Regional Playoff after winning the New Penn South Conference.

24 Apr 19
The A Word

We are officially on week two of my blog. I have added interesting content for new and returning visitors to read. The amount of love that I have received is tremendous. I cannot thank you guys enough. Keep checking back! New content posted every week. Also, I am eager to hear other experiences and opinions […]

23 Apr 19
Nachrichten Welt

Egal, ob Sie Namen suchen, die mit J beginnen, weil Sie einer Namenstradition, einer religiösen Tradition folgen oder einfach nur die Art lieben, wie J-Namen von der Zunge rollen. Wir lieben Jungennamen, die mit J beginnen, können aber argumentieren, dass die Auswahl für Mädchen noch niedlicher sein kann. Ahead, finden Sie 60 unserer absoluten Lieblingsnamen […]

21 Apr 19
Edmonton Journal

Edmontonians marked Easter on Sunday as part of a long weekend that, for many, involved moments of family and faith. Some focused on the holiday’s religious significance, in churches or by carrying a cross during a procession through Edmonton’s streets on Good Friday. Others celebrated with a trip to meet the Easter bunny at the […]

21 Apr 19
Big Country Preps

Big Country girls track bests in each event through April 19.  The lists below will be continuously updated throughout the season. 

21 Apr 19
Serene Cadence

Podcast Series #4 Jensen & Holes: The Murder Squad … This is a podcast unlike ANY I’ve heard before. We’re only 3 episodes in so far, get in on the ground floor! So far, each episode has told a story of a murder laying out the evidence known, and ending with a call to action […]

20 Apr 19
It Happened in Oregon...

The upcoming Fourth of July holiday affords us the opportunity to celebrate the birthday of our country; with local parades, picnics, celebrations, and fireworks displays held nationwide. In addition to celebrating the birth of our country, several thousand local residents celebrate another local birthday, that of the Cottage Grove Speedway, built in 1950s by the […]

19 Apr 19
Indian River Guardian

WEATHER BULLETIN THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HAS ISSUED SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH 92 IN EFFECT UNTIL 10 PM EDT THIS  EVENING FOR THE FOLLOWING REGIONAL AREAS BREVARD INDIAN RIVER LAKE MARTIN OKEECHOBEE ORANGE OSCEOLA SEMINOLE ST. LUCIE VOLUSIA THIS INCLUDES THE CITIES OF ALLANDALE, ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, APOPKA, BASINGER, BASSWOOD ESTATES, BITHLO, CASSELBERRY, CELEBRATION, CONWAY, COUNTRY HILLS […]

19 Apr 19
Thinking Moon

Depression & Anxiety For those of you out there that clicked on this because you relate to having mental health issues, I’m so sorry. If you are just curious and maybe want to learn more, you are still welcome here. I will just warn you though, this won’t be a particularly fun post. When I […]

19 Apr 19
ComJour 425 Blog

For my final project, I will be covering the proposed rule that is requesting to redefine what counts as “waters of the United States” that are subject to federal regulation under the Clean Water Act. Under this rule, restrictions can be lessened on certain bodies of water. For example, bodies of water that aren’t considered […]

18 Apr 19
jaycee in kc

notre dame photos The multimedia piece I chose to critique is about Notre Dame. The piece I chose has a giant image of inside of the burnt cathedral as the first, opening picture of the article. The image he chose, in my personal opinion, is very powerful. It shows the gold cross standing among burnt […]

17 Apr 19
Secret Scotland

18 April is Amateur Radio Day. This day reminds us of the pioneers of radio, their modern descendants, and how radio has been serving a worldwide community for well over 100 years. Back then, they were fighting against people who just didn’t think what they were doing was possible, let alone of any practical use. […]

17 Apr 19
Jenn Faulk

Today’s Wednesday Reads is by one of my favorite Christian romance writers, Jaycee Weaver. This one is her newest book and will be available TOMORROW both for purchase and on Kindle Unlimited! What Makes a Home is the third book in Weaver’s Everyday Love series, but you can enjoy this one as a standalone story, […]

16 Apr 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
Cal Poly Pomona’s football program ground to a halt in 1982 after a then-recent record of 54 wins against 107 losses, as I wrote recently in a column about the university archives. However, I mistakenly said that record came over the program’s last five years. That would have amounted to 32 games per season instead of the usual 10 or 11, as a university official responded puckishly. In fact, that win-loss tally was over the final 16 years, 1967 to 1982. Imagine watching that dismal record play out in real time. Losing that many games in a mere five years might have been a relief all around. The university forwarded me the game-by-game stats of its football program from its start in 1947 to its 1982 demise. Over its 36 years, the record was 143 wins and 190 losses. The Broncos’ best stretch was 1955 to 1962, most of it under Coach Don Warhurst, when the teams had winning records, sometimes with only one or two losses. #gallery-1915767-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1915767-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1915767-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1915767-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ The Cal Poly Pomona Broncos, seen here in 1979. The football program ended three disappointing years later. (Courtesy Cal Poly Special Collections) The Cal Poly Pomona Broncos, seen here in 1979. The football program ended three disappointing years later. (Courtesy Cal Poly Special Collections) The Cal Poly Pomona Broncos team photo from 1977. (Courtesy Cal Poly Special Collections) Its last 20 years had only three winning seasons, despite the presence for two years (1973-’74) of Jim Zorn, the left-handed quarterback who set several school records, went on to play and coach professionally for the Seattle Seahawks and was named 1976 rookie of the year. The program slid after Zorn, not only on the field. The library’s Special Collections Department sent me a copy of a 1982 memo by then-president Hugh La Bounty in which he set down the chronology and reasoning behind his decision to give football the boot. By the mid-1970s coaches had begun raising funds in the community to bolster football and save Cal Poly the money. La Bounty seems to hint that some donors had a negative view of one coach’s entreaties. Without elaborating, he said a successor’s assistants “were obviously involved in funding situations that were not only dishonest, but illegal.” In 1980 La Bounty considered ending the program, which was under NCAA probation, until former Rams quarterback Roman Gabriel offered to coach the team. Gabriel, the NFL’s first Filipino American quarterback, was league MVP in 1969 and a local hero. Although Gabriel had never coached before, “I was delighted with the possibility that Roman might be able to turn our program around,” La Bounty wrote. He continued: “Gabriel did everything that he said he would, except he did not turn the program around.” Details, details. The team went 3-7 in 1980, 4-7 in 1981 and, gulp, 1-10 in 1982, despite unprecedented financial support. The last game, against Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, was a 6-31 loss. La Bounty called the game “tragic.” Seeing the handwriting on the scoreboard, Gabriel left for a coaching job in Boston. La Bounty ended the program Nov. 30. The next day, he wrote the six-page memo to set down his thoughts for posterity rather than for distribution around campus. “This memo is designed for later historians who may have an interest in the decision…” began La Bounty. This later historian thanks him. If he’d put the decision to a vote of some sort, it would have been “overwhelming” to continue the football program, he wrote. But that would have been an emotional vote that would not have answered how to make the program competitive. “To be honest, Coach Gabriel’s resignation made the decision much easier,” La Bounty wrote. He didn’t relish recruiting a new coach while telling them the program’s budget would have to be cut. After my column, one former player contacted me: John Sedia, who was starting fullback and punter in 1973-’74 during the Zorn years. The program was “fairly competitive” then, Sedia said, then went downhill. Regarding Gabriel, Sedia said: “He tried to bring the program back, but by then it was too late.” These days, Cal Poly has 10 sports, equally divided between men and women: basketball, soccer, track and field, and cross country for both sexes, baseball for men and volleyball for women. Also, to look on the bright side, the Broncos have gone undefeated in football since 1983. Still, some miss football. Cal Poly’s Facebook page last September posted Throwback Thursday photos of football. The text noted that the program had produced 22 pro players. “Bring it back!!!!” wrote Jason Morrow. The tailback from the 1982 team, Paul Purter, commented that the last two years produced future pro players Jaycee Pearson, David Grayson, Joe Prokop and Al Smith, not to mention future actor Forest Whitaker. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “It was not a lack of funding that stopped football,” asserted Purter. He didn’t reveal what he believed stopped football. He probably wasn’t going to say a lack of points. Valley Vignette Plywood covers a portion of the Tony’s Famous French Dips storefront in Pomona where a vehicle plowed into it recently, breaking glass and dislodging decades-old bricks. “Customers have asked, ‘Are you getting a drive-thru?’” joked Cedric Elias, who owns the sandwich shop that opened in 1958. He added: “Now we can truly say we have a hole in the wall.” David Allen writes Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, three holes in the newspaper. Email dallen@scng.com, phone 909-483-9339, visit insidesocal.com/davidallen, like davidallencolumnist on Facebook and follow @davidallen909 on Twitter.
16 Apr 19
Whittier Daily News
Cal Poly Pomona’s football program ground to a halt in 1982 after a then-recent record of 54 wins against 107 losses, as I wrote recently in a column about the university archives. However, I mistakenly said that record came over the program’s last five years. That would have amounted to 32 games per season instead of the usual 10 or 11, as a university official responded puckishly. In fact, that win-loss tally was over the final 16 years, 1967 to 1982. Imagine watching that dismal record play out in real time. Losing that many games in a mere five years might have been a relief all around. The university forwarded me the game-by-game stats of its football program from its start in 1947 to its 1982 demise. Over its 36 years, the record was 143 wins and 190 losses. The Broncos’ best stretch was 1955 to 1962, most of it under Coach Don Warhurst, when the teams had winning records, sometimes with only one or two losses. #gallery-1783615-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1783615-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1783615-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1783615-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ The Cal Poly Pomona Broncos, seen here in 1979. The football program ended three disappointing years later. (Courtesy Cal Poly Special Collections) The Cal Poly Pomona Broncos, seen here in 1979. The football program ended three disappointing years later. (Courtesy Cal Poly Special Collections) The Cal Poly Pomona Broncos team photo from 1977. (Courtesy Cal Poly Special Collections) Its last 20 years had only three winning seasons, despite the presence for two years (1973-’74) of Jim Zorn, the left-handed quarterback who set several school records, went on to play and coach professionally for the Seattle Seahawks and was named 1976 rookie of the year. The program slid after Zorn, not only on the field. The library’s Special Collections Department sent me a copy of a 1982 memo by then-president Hugh La Bounty in which he set down the chronology and reasoning behind his decision to give football the boot. By the mid-1970s coaches had begun raising funds in the community to bolster football and save Cal Poly the money. La Bounty seems to hint that some donors had a negative view of one coach’s entreaties. Without elaborating, he said a successor’s assistants “were obviously involved in funding situations that were not only dishonest, but illegal.” In 1980 La Bounty considered ending the program, which was under NCAA probation, until former Rams quarterback Roman Gabriel offered to coach the team. Gabriel, the NFL’s first Filipino American quarterback, was league MVP in 1969 and a local hero. Although Gabriel had never coached before, “I was delighted with the possibility that Roman might be able to turn our program around,” La Bounty wrote. He continued: “Gabriel did everything that he said he would, except he did not turn the program around.” Details, details. The team went 3-7 in 1980, 4-7 in 1981 and, gulp, 1-10 in 1982, despite unprecedented financial support. The last game, against Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, was a 6-31 loss. La Bounty called the game “tragic.” Seeing the handwriting on the scoreboard, Gabriel left for a coaching job in Boston. La Bounty ended the program Nov. 30. The next day, he wrote the six-page memo to set down his thoughts for posterity rather than for distribution around campus. “This memo is designed for later historians who may have an interest in the decision…” began La Bounty. This later historian thanks him. If he’d put the decision to a vote of some sort, it would have been “overwhelming” to continue the football program, he wrote. But that would have been an emotional vote that would not have answered how to make the program competitive. “To be honest, Coach Gabriel’s resignation made the decision much easier,” La Bounty wrote. He didn’t relish recruiting a new coach while telling them the program’s budget would have to be cut. After my column, one former player contacted me: John Sedia, who was starting fullback and punter in 1973-’74 during the Zorn years. The program was “fairly competitive” then, Sedia said, then went downhill. Regarding Gabriel, Sedia said: “He tried to bring the program back, but by then it was too late.” These days, Cal Poly has 10 sports, equally divided between men and women: basketball, soccer, track and field, and cross country for both sexes, baseball for men and volleyball for women. Also, to look on the bright side, the Broncos have gone undefeated in football since 1983. Still, some miss football. Cal Poly’s Facebook page last September posted Throwback Thursday photos of football. The text noted that the program had produced 22 pro players. “Bring it back!!!!” wrote Jason Morrow. The tailback from the 1982 team, Paul Purter, commented that the last two years produced future pro players Jaycee Pearson, David Grayson, Joe Prokop and Al Smith, not to mention future actor Forest Whitaker. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] “It was not a lack of funding that stopped football,” asserted Purter. He didn’t reveal what he believed stopped football. He probably wasn’t going to say a lack of points. Valley Vignette Plywood covers a portion of the Tony’s Famous French Dips storefront in Pomona where a vehicle plowed into it recently, breaking glass and dislodging decades-old bricks. “Customers have asked, ‘Are you getting a drive-thru?’” joked Cedric Elias, who owns the sandwich shop that opened in 1958. He added: “Now we can truly say we have a hole in the wall.” David Allen writes Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, three holes in the newspaper. Email dallen@scng.com, phone 909-483-9339, visit insidesocal.com/davidallen, like davidallencolumnist on Facebook and follow @davidallen909 on Twitter.