John

21 Mar 19
WELL TRAVELED

BACKSTAGE TOUR I always wondered what went on behind the scenes at the Sydney Opera House. Staging as many as 600 performances a year, in Opera, Modern Dance, Ballet, Theatre and Concerts, there has to be a trick to their organization. Designed by Danish Architect Jorn Utzen, who won a design competition, and was built […]

21 Mar 19
John Cowgill's Literature Site

Originally posted on CHRISTian poetry ~ by deborah ann:
Don’t number your burdens, instead count your blessings for burden counting, adding can be gloomy and depressing. So let your mind run free, and add up all the ways God has provided you . . . with your needs each day. Don’t list your complaints, instead tally…

21 Mar 19
Chungsoo

Don’t you believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words I speak are not my own, but my Father who lives in me does his work through me. 11 Just believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me. Or at least believe because of […]

21 Mar 19
Mindfull

Prosecutors have accused John Pierre Dupont, 80, of scamming $250,000 from unwitting political donors who believed they were sending money to various candidates or causes, when in fact the money was… from NDTV News – Latest https://ift.tt/2HyY6ED

21 Mar 19
Jim Eldon

  Lynette and I went to the English traditional music session hosted by Jerry Oakes at Gringley on the Hill near Gainsborough. It’s in the Blue Bell pub. We got there half an hour early so Mossy and I could have some time to play a few of our tunes before things got going properly. […]

21 Mar 19
The Mercury News
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – In the middle of a hectic clubhouse, Giants relief pitcher Will Smith found a free minute and an open table to get caught up on his fan mail. He tore through a stack of white envelopes one by one, unfolding each personalized note, using a Sharpie to put his autograph across the dozens of baseball cards bearing his name, then stuffing them into self-addressed stamped envelopes to be returned to their senders. “This is like a week (of mail) stacked up,” he said, laughing at his collection. “I haven’t done this in a while.” That might be because, unlike past springs when injuries kept him off the mound, Smith hasn’t had a lot of spare time this camp. Instead, he’s been busy building his case to remain the Giants’ closer. “It’s been awesome, just to be a regular guy,” Smith said. “To be able to go out, no restrictions.” By the end of last season, the left-hander was San Francisco’s top option at the back of the bullpen. Throwing a heavy serving of sliders and curveballs, Smith collected 14 saves in 18 opportunities and recorded a 2.55 ERA. At the beginning of the season, however, his role had been unclear. After undergoing Tommy John surgery during spring training in 2017, Smith still wasn’t fully recovered. While his teammates got to play, he was limited him to a tedious routine of bullpen sessions and rehab treatments. He didn’t even make a full return to the mound until early May, more than a year after the procedure on his elbow. “I wasn’t nervous about how my elbow would feel or anything,” he said. “I was just nervous being back in the big leagues again. You’ve waited so long. … It was just one of those, ‘It’s finally here,’ nervous-type moments.” He has been rock solid since. This spring, Smith has three strikeouts and just two hits allowed in three scoreless innings. Though Giants manager Bruce Bochy has yet to officially name his closer, Smith appears to be leading the pack of potential candidates. The Georgia-native wasn’t expecting such a role when he was traded to San Francisco in the middle of 2016. During previous stints with Kansas City (2012-13) and Milwaukee (2014-16), Smith had only one career save. Rather than finish games, he served as a somewhat anonymous set-up guy. For example, one of the baseball cards Smith signed last week displayed his name and stats, but was accidentally printed with a picture of fellow Giants reliever Tony Watson. Though that mix-up would almost certainly not happen to one of the game’s big-name closers, the laid-back Smith found it funny. “A lot of people try to get me and [Watson] to sign the same card,” he chuckled. But 2018 was a career-changing season for Smith. After years of being a No. 2 in the bullpen, he quickly became one of baseball’s more effective shutdown guys. This offseason, his name was mentioned in trade rumors before the Giants signed him in January to a one-year deal worth reportedly $4.225 million. There’s still the potential he could be dealt, perhaps as a piece in the Giants’ pursuit of another outfielder. But that hasn’t weighed on his mind this spring. Instead, he’s enjoyed being able to “just be with the guys” as a healthy member of the clubhouse. “The last couple years, I wouldn’t be allowed to do this, I wouldn’t be allowed to do that,” Smith said. “But now, whatever’s on the schedule, I get to do.” Smith insists he’ll be happy regardless of his role too, even if that means his baseball card next year doesn’t show another big number in the saves column for the 2019 season. “I’ve always said if everybody in the bullpen takes the mentality that ‘We’re all closers, we’re just the sixth or the seventh (innings),’ everything will be fine,” Smith said. “One guy just happens to throw in the ninth inning.” It wouldn’t be a surprise to again see Smith on the mound at the end of most Giants games this season though. Last year he was effective even without a spring to prepare. This season, he’s excited to see what he’ll be capable of with a full spring camp under his belt.      
21 Mar 19
California Nevada Chapter Soil and Water Conservation Society

Planning is coming along well for our Annual Conference. While we usually host these events in the late summer or early fall, we’ve moved up our dates this year in the hopes of engaging more students from the University of Nevada, Reno. We have several speakers and presenters lined up for both our Thursday Field […]

21 Mar 19
kommonsentsjane

My husband I were breezing down the highway returning from the big city and he flipped the radio on and heard this voice which I thought was Fox’s Bret Baier with the evening news; and, lo and behold,  he was really giving President Trump a word stick beating.  In fact, every word strike felt like […]

21 Mar 19
Everything Horror - Official Podcast Website

We all were I would say beyond excited about the Super Bowl Ad containing the teaser trailer for one of the “generations greatest scares” books if I may say, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. The original stories were told by Alvin Schwartz with drawings from Stephen Gammell. Over a course of three books with […]

21 Mar 19
Johngregg's Blog

I’m at the Galleria Mall tonight from 3:00 to 9:00 painting a landscape. Las Vegas Artists Guild has a pop gallery here. It’s just right of the entrance to Dillard’s Tonights 8 x 10 oil paint is coming along #JohnGreggStudios #OilPaintings #LandscapePaintings #ArtistsHelpingArtists #Artist #LocalArtistLasVegasNV #LandscapePaintings #LasVegasNV #GalleriaMall #Dillards #LasVegasArtistsGuild

21 Mar 19
Hydreight

IV Vitamin drips have gone mobile! This is the best way to get the nutrients you need absorbed into the body quickly and at close to 100%. Taking vitamins by pill orally only has at best a 5-10% absorption rate. Dr. John Meyers developed and administered the very first IV vitamin drips in the 1970 […]

21 Mar 19
WPIX 11 New York

President Donald Trump complained Wednesday that he didn’t receive a thank you for approving the funeral the late Sen. John McCain wanted, marking his latest grievance in his recent onslaught against the Arizona Republican. “I endorsed him at his request, and I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as President I […]

21 Mar 19
World Politics News

Mozambique suffered serious destruction from Cyclone Idai last Thursday, and we are just now beginning to appreciate the extent to which the country has been affected. The coastal city of Beira was almost totally destroyed by the cyclone and hundreds of thousands of people have been left homeless. The damage also extended into Malawi and […]

21 Mar 19
24/7 Wall St.

Large gaps in health persist not just across the country, but within every state. County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, in its 2019 annual report released March 19, demonstrates how health outcomes such as life span and behaviors such as smoking, obesity, and exercise vary widely across the country. Positive health outcomes are often the result […]

21 Mar 19
SCNG
  #gallery-1704601-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1704601-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1704601-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1704601-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Ruth MacFarlane gets a kiss from Bill Grant, 103, at her 106th birthday celebration at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. The pair took a photo with Edith Cunningham, 102, right. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ruth MacFarlane celebrated her 106th birthday at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) A photo of Ruth MacFarlane shows her on the horse she rode to Santa Ana High School about 1925. Ruth celebrated her 106th birthday at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ruth MacFarlane, left, has a laugh with Jackie Cowdell during Ruth’s 106th birthday celebration at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) A photo shows Ruth MacFarlane, left, with two friends at the Newport Back Bay about 1928. Ruth celebrated her 106th birthday at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) A double-exposure photo of Ruth MacFarlane and her dad, Jessie James Beemar was shot about 1917. Ruth celebrated her 106th birthday at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ruth MacFarlane takes a photo with cook Marcelino Ruiz during Ruth’s 106th birthday celebration at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) A photo shows Ruth MacFarlane in her high school senior portrait from Santa Ana High School about 1933. Ruth celebrated her 106th birthday at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ruth MacFarlane takes a photo with former resident Glenn Sauls during Ruth’s 106th birthday celebration at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Sauls moved out in August but told Ruth he would be back for her birthday. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ruth MacFarlane, center, takes a photo with Bill Grant, 103, and Edith Cunningham, 102, at her 106th birthday celebration at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ruth MacFarlane smiles after blowing out the candles at her 106th birthday celebration at Sunrise at Tustin on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. (Photo by Paul Bersebach, Orange County Register/SCNG) Ruth MacFarlane was a little disappointed by the number of candles on her cake. “I wanted all 106,” she remarked, before blowing out just three. MacFarlane wasn’t born yesterday. So the “surprise” birthday luncheon hosted by her assisted living residence Wednesday, March 19, didn’t really come as a surprise. In fact, MacFarlane herself orchestrated media coverage – telling Sunrise at Tustin employees to get the word out. “I thought my photograph should be in the newspaper,” she unabashedly explained. Ten members of her family – which includes three children, seven grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren – gathered to help her celebrate. “Don’t listen to anything my children have to say,” MacFarland advised. “Their brain isn’t as good as mine.” Two lively great-grandkids, Tustin Ranch Elementary students Brooklyn and Brandon Hamilton, showed up. “I accidentally told my friends she’s turning 115,” Brandon, 7, announced. “I was trying to remember: 107? 108? What the heck, I’ll say 115!” MacFarlane is one of the oldest people in Orange County. And she’s the oldest at Sunrise, where she counts among three centenarians. Bill Grant comes in second at 103. Both graduated from Santa Ana High, but due to their vast age difference didn’t know each other there. What did Grant think of MacFarlane’s fete? “She’s kind of old,” he shrugged. “I’m trying to catch up.” Her family roots run deep in central Orange County, with her two oldest children and even their spouses Santa Ana High alumni, as well. MacFarlane – then Ruth Beemar – moved with her parents and four siblings from Illinois to Santa Ana at age 4. “It was during the Spanish flu,” she said of the 1918 pandemic. “My parents didn’t want to take the train so we drove.” MacFarlane recalled an idyllic childhood, riding horses around her family’s 20-acre walnut orchard. After graduation, she enrolled in beauty school. “I could do anything with hair and nails, but I didn’t much like it,” MacFarlane said. “So I got a job as a dental assistant.” A few years later, at 23, she married Robert MacFarlane – an electrician who later opened a shop on Main Street. Even after his death in 2003, the building continued to bear his name. “A doctor told us we probably couldn’t have children. Three months later, this one was on her way,” MacFarlane said, pointing to daughter Sandra Berry, 80. “We were very happy about that.” Next came John, now 75, then Doug, 67. They raised the brood in Santa Ana and then Tustin, where Doug MacFarland graduated from Foothill High. “Mom never learned to drive,” he said. “Dad took care of her.” Sharing memories of rock-hard pork chops, MacFarlane’s children laughingly agreed she was a mediocre cook. But she kept a beautiful home and, ever devoted, practiced baseball with her kids when their father worked late. In 1970, the couple moved to Villa Park. Leaving her home of 48 years last year “was like a stab in my heart,” MacFarlane said. “I loved that house so much.” MacFarlane didn’t much feel like talking about all the major events in her lifetime, such as World War II and the first man on the moon. But she is proud to claim a grandfather who fought in the Civil War “for our greatest president ever, Abraham Lincoln.” All of her friends have died. “You don’t think about it much because you expect old people to die,” MacFarlane said. But when a grandson died of cancer at 47, “It was a terrible loss, a terrible blow.” MacFarlane chose to sit with her regular lunch buddies rather than at the long table set for her kinfolk. “She’s the sweetest, smartest and funniest one at our table,” said Ethel Poh, 88. “She laughs a lot. That’s why she’s lived so long.” At party’s end, John MacFarlane deflated, for future use, the three Mylar balloons spelling “106.” “In three years,” he said, “we’ll turn the 6 around for 109.”