John Carpenter

26 May 19
Carl's Blog

5-27-19: Elvin “Ebb Gentry (1924-2006) Elvin “Ebb” Gentry was born in Edgemont, Cleburne County, Arkansas, on August 8, 1924.  He was the son of Elmer Gentry and Molly Parker Gentry of Edgemont.  Ebb was educated in the Edgemont School System.  He spent his entire life in the Edgemont and Greers Ferry communities.  He chose farming, […]

26 May 19
Setting the Scene

The car in this film is evil… ‘Bad to the Bone’. The opening shows the birth of the car on a Detroit assembly line. The car is introduced as a character in its own right as opposed to becoming possessed by its previous owner as written in the Stephen King book. The car is a […]

26 May 19
Newsy Today

This is the sentence repeated every day Cyril Zannettacci Raphael his assistant: "Come on, let's go fishing." Too bad for the clouds, the drizzle and the grosgrain that soggy the Croisette during the Cannes Film Festival, the photographer, to feed the notebook of Libé which was dedicated to him, jumped into the water by wetting […]

26 May 19
Travel Monkey

Kongo loves living in the Golden State.  There’s always a lot to see and do just about anywhere you visit here. Over this Memorial Day weekend he was in the Sacramento area and decided to explore the origin of the “gold” in the Golden State. It was all pretty much of an accident and involved […]

26 May 19

This might, just might, have the most ISCFC-level star-studded cast of all time. If you’re not at least intrigued after I list them, then…well, I’ve got no idea why you’re reading this.   Evan Lurie (Expect To Die; Hologram Man; Cyborg 3) Sherrie Rose (Summer Job; Night Claws; No Retreat, No Surrender 3; Cy-Warrior) Robert […]

26 May 19
News Directory

CLOSE Excavations and fashion known to the Movement on Saturday included a long-standing feature from the annual Detroit Techno Festival: the legal advocates of marijuana-legalization who put a line of Hart Plaza sidewalks for years. With a completed mission – or a large part of at least – in late 2018, there was less urgency […]

26 May 19
Archy Worldys

This is the sentence repeated every day Cyril Zannettacci Raphael his assistant: "Come on, let's go fishing." Too bad for the clouds, the drizzle and the grosgrain that soggy the Croisette during the Cannes Film Festival, the photographer, to feed the notebook of Libé which was dedicated to him, jumped into the water by wetting […]

26 May 19
News, reviews, features and comment from the London jazz scene and beyond

John Helliwell of Big Band Supertramp Photo Credit and © William Ellis Frank Griffith attended three very diverse concerts on the Friday (24 May) of the 2019 Manchester Jazz Festival. He writes: A particular highlight for this listener was the debut of “Big Band Supertramp featuring John Helliwell and The Big Supertramp Band “. Their […]

26 May 19
Movie Tuesday

Aladdin Disney is moving through the live action world of its cartoons of the 1990’s having harvested so much of its earlier catalogue and already turned it live action a few times over with films like Into the woods (Chris Pine). Oh imagine if that means it is going to cartoonise some of its live […]

26 May 19
Interesting Literature

Are these the best examples of nonsense verse in English? Nonsense literature is one of the great subsets of English literature, and for many of us a piece of nonsense verse is our first entry into the world of poetry. In this post, we’ve selected ten of the greatest works of nonsense poetry. We’ve omitted […]

26 May 19
IndieWire
The Cannes Film Festival may be one of the great celebrations for cinema on Earth, but even the best lineup doesn’t guarantee a strong market. Yes, movies sold at the 2019 edition: Highlights such as “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” (NEON/Hulu), “Les Miserables” (Amazon), “The Climb” (Sony Pictures Classics), and “Atlantics” (Netflix) found homes at the festival and will likely continue to generate buzz throughout the year. But the international context of the festival makes it hard to gauge how films that play in the cinephile-friendly gathering can find success in release. Needless to say, there were several Cannes highlights that ended the festival without North American distribution in place. Here are a few of them. If distributors are reading this, take note: We know you can do this. “Bacurau” “Bacurau” Nothing in Kleber Mendonça Filho’s Sonia Braga drama “Aquarius” could have prepared audiences for this unclassifiable dystopian Western fever dream, co-directed by Juliano Dornelles. “Bacurau” unfolds in a near-future desert setting, as the eponymous remote community contends with a water crisis and a mysterious pack of American vigilantes who have been picking off their people one by one. The movie’s cryptic plot is equal parts John Carpenter and Sergio Leone as it builds to a bloody showdown between warring factions straight out of “Seven Samurai.” In other words, it’s exactly the sort of love letter to first-class filmmaking that a former critic like Filho would make, as well as a visionary cinematic achievement on its own terms. Among the many joys of “Bacurau”: Sonia Braga as a hard-drinking, no-nonsense doctor; Udo Kier as a demented killer; an ebullient neighborhood guitarist who follows locals around and sings songs about their lives; and a local fixation on psychedelics, which enter into the plot more than once. “Bacurau” moves along in remarkable fits of inspiration, careening from playful explorations of communal support and progressive relationships to violent showdowns and ideological spats. Plus, there are UFOs and ghosts. What else do you need to know? The movie may strike some distributors as a tough sell, but consider this: It’s got sex, violence, dramatic payoff, and conversation-starting ideas about the modern world. Lean into those selling points, cut a killer trailer, and “Bacurau” could be a surprise hit. —EK Sales Contact: contact@sbs-distribution.fr “Beanpole” “Beanpole” There’s no sugar-coating the fact that Kantemir Balagov’s heartbreaking “Beanpole” isn’t the easiest sell in the world. Inspired by Svetlana Alexievich’s book “The Unwomanly Face of War,” the film is a methodical and sometimes grueling 134-minute period drama about two Russian women — best friends — who grow so desperate for any kind of personal agency after the Siege of Leningrad that they start using each other to answer the unsolvable arithmetic of life and death. Starring Viktoria Miroshnichenko as Iya, a nurse suffering from post-concussion syndrome, and Vasilisa Perelygina as Masha, a traumatized soldier whose son Iya accidentally suffocates to death, “Beanpole” isn’t for the faint of heart; imagine a cross between “4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days” and an Andrei Tarkovksy film and you’ll be on the right track. But, with a little patience, Balagov’s “Closeness” follow-up offers a tremendous bounty of rewards. Told with steely resolve, brutal honesty, and the kind of post-war production detail that deserves comparison to that seen in “Roma,” “Beanpole” accumulates an immense power as its story gradually sprouts from the miserablism where it begins. Balagov elicits astounding performances from his lead actresses (both newcomers), and they in turn elevate this film to a rarefied place of emotional transcendence in the unshakeable final scene. A boutique distributor with an eye for quality and a flair for connecting with adventurous audiences would be wise to put their stamp on a film that will only grow in renown over the years to come. —DE Sales Contact: Wild Bunch “First Love” “First Love” A boxer with a brain tumor, a crooked cop with terrible luck, a screw-up yakuza who’s seen too many movies, a dismembered Chinese gangster who wields a pump-action shotgun with his one remaining arm, a terrified prostitute who’s stalked by a ghost in tighty whities, an un-killable femme fatale who will kick a man to death just for being in her way, and the world’s most wonderful heroin. Those are just some of the many different ingredients that prolific Japanese auteur Takashi Miike swirls into his frequently sublime new gangster film, a piece of work so feral and full of life that you’d never guess it was (at least) the 90th feature its director has made in the last 30 years. And while the opening act might seem too serious to support the cutesy title, the most amazing thing about “First Love” is how sincerely it feels like Miike’s take on an ensemble romantic comedy, as the movie explodes into a hilariously absurdist ride that brings all of its characters together in the wackiest of ways, and even forges some beautiful bonds between them in the process. “First Love” would play just fine on VOD (especially if people watched it together with their friends), but it would have the potential to blossom into a genuine cult hit if a smart distributor with a taste for grindhouse-adjacent fare gave it the theatrical run Miike deserves, and allowed audiences to experience this hugely satisfying crowdpleaser as it was meant to be seen. The crowd at Cannes erupted into spontaneous applause on at least two different occasions during the Directors’ Fortnight premiere, and that energy could easily translate across the pond. —DE Sales Contact: HanWay Films “Lux Æterna” “Lux Æterna” The insuppressible Gaspar Noé took a gig to make a 15-minute Yves Saint Laurent ad and turned it into a freewheeling, neon-drenched 50-minute exploration of the filmmaking process. Béatrice Dalle is hilarious in the lead role as a version of herself, making her directorial debut on a film shoot that keeps going very wrong. Charlotte Gainsbourg (also playing herself) is tasked with acting in a post-modern tale of witchcraft, but Noé’s rapid-fire narrative has a lot more on his mind than this straightforward plot. The movie regularly cuts away to text-based musings on the filmmaking process, and climaxes with an unnerving 10 minutes of stereoscopics. But despite its visceral provocations, “Lux Æterna” always shows the mark of a filmmaker in control of his outlandish material, and the movie manages to deliver its outrageous twists with a consistent fixation on the chaos of the creative process. An adventurous distributor could propel this unclassifiable shot of cinematic inspiration to a successful launch on VOD, but rumor has it that Noé has more footage for “Lux Æterna” and could actually transform it into a more traditional feature-length achievement — which would make it a terrific candidate for word-of-mouth success. In any case, Noé is a singular film artist whose work deserves an audience. —EK Sales Contact: Wild Bunch “Tommaso” “Tommaso” Fatherhood and midlife doldrums are not the usual terrain for director Abel Ferrara, whose dark tales of angry urbanites have coalesced into a striking vision of despair across several decades, but everyone grows up sometime. In the scrappy and often endearing drama “Tommaso,” Ferrara casts regular muse Willem Dafoe as a fictionalized version of the filmmaker himself, a broken man still picking up the pieces from his prior misdeeds to find some measure of stability. Having found a new life in Italy with a much younger wife and child — both played by the real ones in Ferrara’s life — Tommaso struggles to reconcile a new beginning with the stumbles of the past. A microbudget “Birdman” about the travails of a once-successful artist losing his grasp on reality, “Tommaso” comes across as Ferrara’s most personal work on many levels. The lo-fi chamber piece is a messy, ruminative self-portrait, elevated by Dafoe’s extraordinary performance and a striking intimacy that sets the movie apart from much of Ferrara’s work. The lo-fi aesthetic may scare off some distributors, but Dafoe is arguably entering his greatest period as an actor, and “Tommaso” is another distillation of his unparalleled talent. A strong campaign built around his performance could yield solid returns, as well as a welcome opportunity to evaluate Ferrara’s resilience as a filmmaker. —EK Sales Contact: Match Factory
26 May 19
To Be Man or King

You Loved Darkness Rather Than Light To know the truth does not save a man. Even the devil knows the truth. It is the love of truth that will save a man. The actionable love of truth. To have wisdom doesn’t prolong a man’s life, if he hides it from his own face. For you […]

26 May 19
ccoutreach87

SUNDAY SERMON  5-26-19 Isaiah 7:14 Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel. Blog- https://corpuschristioutreachministries.blogspot.com/ The blog is my main site- on some sites if you click the link it gives a ‘warning’- if that happens- simply type the […]

26 May 19
LESSONS IN GOD'S WORD

Laying the Foundation for Joy 1 Peter Chapter 1:1-12 The Apostle Peter (the Rock) was the son of a man named Jonas who was also a fisherman and Peter took up the occupation of “fisherman” on the Sea of Tiberias (Galilee). Peter and his brother Andrew were partners of John and James. Notice how God […]

26 May 19
PoeEternal

I haven’t wrote a poem for my piece-of-shit ex in awhile, and he recently had a birthday, so just in case he thought I’d stopped preying (yes preying) for his death, I HAVEN’T. I’m like that vampire slayer in John Carpenters film, “DIE DIE DIE” *stabs you where your heart should be*

26 May 19
Metal Reviews/Blog

Forged under the harsh Arizona sun, Spirit Adrift led by guitarist/songwriter Nate Garrett from old school death metal revivalists Gatecreeper. Their debut album “Chained to Oblivion” forged a path through the doom and gloom. But it was their second outing “Curse of Conception” where the band decided to dive into more classic heavy metal territory […]

26 May 19
Rational Nation USA

If you believe it’s time for an autocratic, childish dictator to govern America then you have your man in Donald J. Trump. Certainly you will want to reelect him. Maybe even call for passing a constitutional amendment to make it possible for him to rule until his death. Putting snark aside, you just might want […]