John Parris

23 Apr 19
From the Stands Sports

With the draft just days away, I had to get a few things off my chest. Featuring a finalized 60-prospect Big Board, and some prospects that I love and don’t love.

23 Apr 19
The Fantasy Fanalysts

The Fanalysts have been grinding draft tape, monitoring team needs, and mock drafting since December. This 7-part mock-draft is one continuous mock draft and the final one of the season for us. We will be releasing one article per day in the week leading up to the 2019 NFL Draft. This is a summary of […]

23 Apr 19
Touchdown Wire

When I put together the scouting reports for the recent Top 50 draft prospects list, player comparisons were something I put a lot of work into. Not just because it gives the reader an easy picture of players they may or may not have seen yet, but also because it gives a general impression of […]

23 Apr 19
NESN.com

[nesn_embed service=dailymotion src=”https://www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/x762wcm?autoPlay=1″ width=”480″ height=”270″] All of the speculation, smoke-screens and forecasting ends in just two short days when the 2019 NFL Draft finally (mercifully) begins. Here’s our final crack at mocking the first round of the 2019 NFL Draft. 1. Arizona Cardinals — QB Kyler Murray, Oklahoma We think it’s crazy to give up […]

23 Apr 19
High Velocity Sport

Inside the 2019 NFL draft class: 50 facts you didn’t know https://es.pn/2IQ3YcH Two hundred fifty-four names will be called on the stage in Nashville, Tennessee, over the course of three days this week. And many of those 2019 NFL draft class prospects come with fascinating backgrounds, pro connections and interests. The relative of a jazz […]

23 Apr 19
The Scorecrow

With the NFL Draft starting in two days, the New Orleans Saints are getting ready, as are all 31 other teams. The Saints don’t pick in the first round but still have six picks overall. Let’s take a look at who they will take.

23 Apr 19
William Corbin

This was inspired by John Douglas Elliott’s ‘Ideal Mock Draft’ Exercise which can be found here: https://johndouglaselliott.wordpress.com/2019/04/22/my-ideal-panthers-mock/ He has an excellent twitter feed – go follow at @johndelliott. Panthers Ideal Mock Draft (The Draft Network Simulation) 16. Jonah Williams – One of the best competitors in the draft and a three year starter at left […]

23 Apr 19
Shports and Stuff

We’re finally nearing the finish line, the 2019 NFL Draft will be held this Thursday, April 25th in Nashville Tennessee. After nearly three months of waiting and reading hundreds of mock drafts to pass the time, it’s finally coming. With all the rumours and reports floating around the internet, I have made my final mock […]

23 Apr 19
American Witches: In Salem and On Screen

By: Isabella Conner The Salem Witch Trials took place between February of 1692, and May of 1693. In that time, twenty of the accused were killed under charges of witchcraft, and at least five others died in jail after being arrested. There is no simple answer as to why the Witch Trials occurred–it was such […]

22 Apr 19
The South Cass Tribune

Dorothy Pearl Ayler Feb. 28, 1933 – April 1, 2019 Dorothy Pearl Cowan was born Feb. 28, 1933, just northeast of Garden City. As a child they moved to what she called home, a farm north of Latour. There, she attended school up to her sophomore year. During high school she played basketball, back when […]

22 Apr 19
Box Score Sports

By 7 pm this Saturday, 254 young men will have their lives potentially changed forever and can call themselves NFL draft picks. They will all take the first step toward potentially joining the likes of John Elway, Terrell Davis, Emmitt Smith, Jerry Rice, Ed “Too Tall” Jones, Dermontti Dawson, Ray Guy, and Morten Andersen in […]

22 Apr 19
The Reporter
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=49ers-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] SANTA CLARA – The 49ers coveted the No. 2 overall draft pick so much they refused to swap it last month for wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. Could they instead use that pick on some new hot shot to catch Jimmy Garoppolo’s passes into the next decade? Hold on, there. Only five wide receivers have gone in the draft’s top two slots since 1970, and none in this year’s class are so highly perceived. Maybe, just maybe, if the 49ers trade down – rather than draft a defensive lineman for the fourth time in five years with their top pick – several wide receivers might be worthy of a first-round pick later Thursday night. “I want to continue adding at all positions and I definitely think we need to at receiver,” coach Kyle Shanahan said at last month’s owners meetings. Jimmy Garoppolo and Dante Pettis. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) That need didn’t vanish once the 49ers traded up in last year’s second round to draft Dante Pettis, who could unseat Marquise Goodwin as the starting split end this season. The 49ers need a go-to flanker, and the draft’s opening night might yield that receiver to compete against Kendrick Bourne and free agent addition Jordan Matthews. Is finding another target for Garoppolo more urgent than adding a defensive end, a free safety, or a cornerback? Maybe. Maybe not. Before scouting out this draft’s receiver class, a history lesson: Since 1970, the only wide receivers to go in the top two picks are Johnny “Lam” Jones (1980, Jets; No. 2), Irving Fryer (1984, Patriots; No. 1), Keyshawn Johnson (1996, Jets; No. 1), Charles Rogers (2003, Lions; No. 2), and Calvin Johnson (2007, Lions; No. 2) Then there’s the 49ers mixed history: Jerry Rice lasted until 16th overall in 1985 – the same spot Gene Washington arrived to the 49ers in 1969. First-round status comes with expectations others didn’t fulfill, such as: J.J. Stokes (10th overall,1995), Rashaun Woods (31st, 2004), Michael Crabtree (10th, 2009) and A.J. Jenkins (30th, 2012). Perhaps the 49ers stick with the obvious plan: take the best pass rusher available for their defense, then later unearth a gem of a receiver, such as Dwight Clark (10th round, 1979) or Terrell Owens (third round, 1996). Here are nine the Niners should consider: 1. N’Keal Harry, Arizona State (6-foot-2, 228 pounds): He makes the contested catch, and while critics will say that means he can’t separate, there is no denying his play-making ability. Can Sun Devils coach Herm Edwards convince good pal John Lynch to take Harry? 2. A.J. Brown, Mississippi (6-0, 226): After 11 touchdowns and 1,252 yards as a sophomore, his encore featured 85 receptions for 1,320 yards and 6 TDs. 3. Parris Campbell, Ohio State (6-foot, 205): His versatility and speed fit the mold Shanahan seeks in his wide receivers. 4. D.K. Metcalf, Mississippi (6-3, 228): He won the combine with speed (4.33-second 40-yard dash) and athleticism, amid concerns over a neck injury and minimal production last year (5 TDs, 26 catches). He’s a split end the 49ers don’t really need. 5. Deebo Samuel, South Carolina (5-11, 240): The 49ers saw up-close at the Senior Bowl how well Samuel can separate and run routes. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]6. Marquise Brown, Oklahoma (5-9, 166): Antonio Brown’s diminutive cousin is coming off Lisfranc foot surgery but is a refined route runner. He doesn’t fit the need of a big, physical receiver.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] 7. Hakeem Butler, Iowa State (6-5, 227): A big-body target in the red zone seems almost too good to be true, and he did more than that last year (60 catches, 1,318 yards, 9 TDs). 8. J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Stanford (6-2, 225): The Cardinal exploited mismatches by having him post up in the end zone to catch touchdown lobs, leading to 23 touchdowns the past two years. 9. Riley Ridley, Georgia (6-1, 199): Younger brother of Falcons receiver Calvin Ridley, he had modest gains his first two seasons (avg. 13 catches, 228 yards, 2 TDs) but came on strong in bowl action and in 2018 (43-559-9).  
22 Apr 19
Redwood Times
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=49ers-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] SANTA CLARA – The 49ers coveted the No. 2 overall draft pick so much they refused to swap it last month for wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. Could they instead use that pick on some new hot shot to catch Jimmy Garoppolo’s passes into the next decade? Hold on, there. Only five wide receivers have gone in the draft’s top two slots since 1970, and none in this year’s class are so highly perceived. Maybe, just maybe, if the 49ers trade down – rather than draft a defensive lineman for the fourth time in five years with their top pick – several wide receivers might be worthy of a first-round pick later Thursday night. “I want to continue adding at all positions and I definitely think we need to at receiver,” coach Kyle Shanahan said at last month’s owners meetings. Jimmy Garoppolo and Dante Pettis. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) That need didn’t vanish once the 49ers traded up in last year’s second round to draft Dante Pettis, who could unseat Marquise Goodwin as the starting split end this season. The 49ers need a go-to flanker, and the draft’s opening night might yield that receiver to compete against Kendrick Bourne and free agent addition Jordan Matthews. Is finding another target for Garoppolo more urgent than adding a defensive end, a free safety, or a cornerback? Maybe. Maybe not. Before scouting out this draft’s receiver class, a history lesson: Since 1970, the only wide receivers to go in the top two picks are Johnny “Lam” Jones (1980, Jets; No. 2), Irving Fryer (1984, Patriots; No. 1), Keyshawn Johnson (1996, Jets; No. 1), Charles Rogers (2003, Lions; No. 2), and Calvin Johnson (2007, Lions; No. 2) Then there’s the 49ers mixed history: Jerry Rice lasted until 16th overall in 1985 – the same spot Gene Washington arrived to the 49ers in 1969. First-round status comes with expectations others didn’t fulfill, such as: J.J. Stokes (10th overall,1995), Rashaun Woods (31st, 2004), Michael Crabtree (10th, 2009) and A.J. Jenkins (30th, 2012). Perhaps the 49ers stick with the obvious plan: take the best pass rusher available for their defense, then later unearth a gem of a receiver, such as Dwight Clark (10th round, 1979) or Terrell Owens (third round, 1996). Here are nine the Niners should consider: 1. N’Keal Harry, Arizona State (6-foot-2, 228 pounds): He makes the contested catch, and while critics will say that means he can’t separate, there is no denying his play-making ability. Can Sun Devils coach Herm Edwards convince good pal John Lynch to take Harry? 2. A.J. Brown, Mississippi (6-0, 226): After 11 touchdowns and 1,252 yards as a sophomore, his encore featured 85 receptions for 1,320 yards and 6 TDs. 3. Parris Campbell, Ohio State (6-foot, 205): His versatility and speed fit the mold Shanahan seeks in his wide receivers. 4. D.K. Metcalf, Mississippi (6-3, 228): He won the combine with speed (4.33-second 40-yard dash) and athleticism, amid concerns over a neck injury and minimal production last year (5 TDs, 26 catches). He’s a split end the 49ers don’t really need. 5. Deebo Samuel, South Carolina (5-11, 240): The 49ers saw up-close at the Senior Bowl how well Samuel can separate and run routes. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]6. Marquise Brown, Oklahoma (5-9, 166): Antonio Brown’s diminutive cousin is coming off Lisfranc foot surgery but is a refined route runner. He doesn’t fit the need of a big, physical receiver.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] 7. Hakeem Butler, Iowa State (6-5, 227): A big-body target in the red zone seems almost too good to be true, and he did more than that last year (60 catches, 1,318 yards, 9 TDs). 8. J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Stanford (6-2, 225): The Cardinal exploited mismatches by having him post up in the end zone to catch touchdown lobs, leading to 23 touchdowns the past two years. 9. Riley Ridley, Georgia (6-1, 199): Younger brother of Falcons receiver Calvin Ridley, he had modest gains his first two seasons (avg. 13 catches, 228 yards, 2 TDs) but came on strong in bowl action and in 2018 (43-559-9).  
22 Apr 19
Paradise Post
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=49ers-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] SANTA CLARA – The 49ers coveted the No. 2 overall draft pick so much they refused to swap it last month for wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. Could they instead use that pick on some new hot shot to catch Jimmy Garoppolo’s passes into the next decade? Hold on, there. Only five wide receivers have gone in the draft’s top two slots since 1970, and none in this year’s class are so highly perceived. Maybe, just maybe, if the 49ers trade down – rather than draft a defensive lineman for the fourth time in five years with their top pick – several wide receivers might be worthy of a first-round pick later Thursday night. “I want to continue adding at all positions and I definitely think we need to at receiver,” coach Kyle Shanahan said at last month’s owners meetings. Jimmy Garoppolo and Dante Pettis. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) That need didn’t vanish once the 49ers traded up in last year’s second round to draft Dante Pettis, who could unseat Marquise Goodwin as the starting split end this season. The 49ers need a go-to flanker, and the draft’s opening night might yield that receiver to compete against Kendrick Bourne and free agent addition Jordan Matthews. Is finding another target for Garoppolo more urgent than adding a defensive end, a free safety, or a cornerback? Maybe. Maybe not. Before scouting out this draft’s receiver class, a history lesson: Since 1970, the only wide receivers to go in the top two picks are Johnny “Lam” Jones (1980, Jets; No. 2), Irving Fryer (1984, Patriots; No. 1), Keyshawn Johnson (1996, Jets; No. 1), Charles Rogers (2003, Lions; No. 2), and Calvin Johnson (2007, Lions; No. 2) Then there’s the 49ers mixed history: Jerry Rice lasted until 16th overall in 1985 – the same spot Gene Washington arrived to the 49ers in 1969. First-round status comes with expectations others didn’t fulfill, such as: J.J. Stokes (10th overall,1995), Rashaun Woods (31st, 2004), Michael Crabtree (10th, 2009) and A.J. Jenkins (30th, 2012). Perhaps the 49ers stick with the obvious plan: take the best pass rusher available for their defense, then later unearth a gem of a receiver, such as Dwight Clark (10th round, 1979) or Terrell Owens (third round, 1996). Here are nine the Niners should consider: 1. N’Keal Harry, Arizona State (6-foot-2, 228 pounds): He makes the contested catch, and while critics will say that means he can’t separate, there is no denying his play-making ability. Can Sun Devils coach Herm Edwards convince good pal John Lynch to take Harry? 2. A.J. Brown, Mississippi (6-0, 226): After 11 touchdowns and 1,252 yards as a sophomore, his encore featured 85 receptions for 1,320 yards and 6 TDs. 3. Parris Campbell, Ohio State (6-foot, 205): His versatility and speed fit the mold Shanahan seeks in his wide receivers. 4. D.K. Metcalf, Mississippi (6-3, 228): He won the combine with speed (4.33-second 40-yard dash) and athleticism, amid concerns over a neck injury and minimal production last year (5 TDs, 26 catches). He’s a split end the 49ers don’t really need. 5. Deebo Samuel, South Carolina (5-11, 240): The 49ers saw up-close at the Senior Bowl how well Samuel can separate and run routes. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]6. Marquise Brown, Oklahoma (5-9, 166): Antonio Brown’s diminutive cousin is coming off Lisfranc foot surgery but is a refined route runner. He doesn’t fit the need of a big, physical receiver.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] 7. Hakeem Butler, Iowa State (6-5, 227): A big-body target in the red zone seems almost too good to be true, and he did more than that last year (60 catches, 1,318 yards, 9 TDs). 8. J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Stanford (6-2, 225): The Cardinal exploited mismatches by having him post up in the end zone to catch touchdown lobs, leading to 23 touchdowns the past two years. 9. Riley Ridley, Georgia (6-1, 199): Younger brother of Falcons receiver Calvin Ridley, he had modest gains his first two seasons (avg. 13 catches, 228 yards, 2 TDs) but came on strong in bowl action and in 2018 (43-559-9).  
22 Apr 19
Santa Cruz Sentinel
[dfm_iframe src=”https://apps.mercurynews.com/newsletters-signup/?campaign=49ers-hq” width=”100%” height=”220px” allowfullscreen=”yes” scrolling=”yes” /] SANTA CLARA – The 49ers coveted the No. 2 overall draft pick so much they refused to swap it last month for wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. Could they instead use that pick on some new hot shot to catch Jimmy Garoppolo’s passes into the next decade? Hold on, there. Only five wide receivers have gone in the draft’s top two slots since 1970, and none in this year’s class are so highly perceived. Maybe, just maybe, if the 49ers trade down – rather than draft a defensive lineman for the fourth time in five years with their top pick – several wide receivers might be worthy of a first-round pick later Thursday night. “I want to continue adding at all positions and I definitely think we need to at receiver,” coach Kyle Shanahan said at last month’s owners meetings. Jimmy Garoppolo and Dante Pettis. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group) That need didn’t vanish once the 49ers traded up in last year’s second round to draft Dante Pettis, who could unseat Marquise Goodwin as the starting split end this season. The 49ers need a go-to flanker, and the draft’s opening night might yield that receiver to compete against Kendrick Bourne and free agent addition Jordan Matthews. Is finding another target for Garoppolo more urgent than adding a defensive end, a free safety, or a cornerback? Maybe. Maybe not. Before scouting out this draft’s receiver class, a history lesson: Since 1970, the only wide receivers to go in the top two picks are Johnny “Lam” Jones (1980, Jets; No. 2), Irving Fryer (1984, Patriots; No. 1), Keyshawn Johnson (1996, Jets; No. 1), Charles Rogers (2003, Lions; No. 2), and Calvin Johnson (2007, Lions; No. 2) Then there’s the 49ers mixed history: Jerry Rice lasted until 16th overall in 1985 – the same spot Gene Washington arrived to the 49ers in 1969. First-round status comes with expectations others didn’t fulfill, such as: J.J. Stokes (10th overall,1995), Rashaun Woods (31st, 2004), Michael Crabtree (10th, 2009) and A.J. Jenkins (30th, 2012). Perhaps the 49ers stick with the obvious plan: take the best pass rusher available for their defense, then later unearth a gem of a receiver, such as Dwight Clark (10th round, 1979) or Terrell Owens (third round, 1996). Here are nine the Niners should consider: 1. N’Keal Harry, Arizona State (6-foot-2, 228 pounds): He makes the contested catch, and while critics will say that means he can’t separate, there is no denying his play-making ability. Can Sun Devils coach Herm Edwards convince good pal John Lynch to take Harry? 2. A.J. Brown, Mississippi (6-0, 226): After 11 touchdowns and 1,252 yards as a sophomore, his encore featured 85 receptions for 1,320 yards and 6 TDs. 3. Parris Campbell, Ohio State (6-foot, 205): His versatility and speed fit the mold Shanahan seeks in his wide receivers. 4. D.K. Metcalf, Mississippi (6-3, 228): He won the combine with speed (4.33-second 40-yard dash) and athleticism, amid concerns over a neck injury and minimal production last year (5 TDs, 26 catches). He’s a split end the 49ers don’t really need. 5. Deebo Samuel, South Carolina (5-11, 240): The 49ers saw up-close at the Senior Bowl how well Samuel can separate and run routes. [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]6. Marquise Brown, Oklahoma (5-9, 166): Antonio Brown’s diminutive cousin is coming off Lisfranc foot surgery but is a refined route runner. He doesn’t fit the need of a big, physical receiver.[related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”] 7. Hakeem Butler, Iowa State (6-5, 227): A big-body target in the red zone seems almost too good to be true, and he did more than that last year (60 catches, 1,318 yards, 9 TDs). 8. J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Stanford (6-2, 225): The Cardinal exploited mismatches by having him post up in the end zone to catch touchdown lobs, leading to 23 touchdowns the past two years. 9. Riley Ridley, Georgia (6-1, 199): Younger brother of Falcons receiver Calvin Ridley, he had modest gains his first two seasons (avg. 13 catches, 228 yards, 2 TDs) but came on strong in bowl action and in 2018 (43-559-9).