Jon Favreau

20 Jul 19
Jordan Woodson's Reviews

“The Lion King” is directed Jon Favreau (Director of the live action Jungle Book and Happy in the MCU) and is the realistic version of the 1994 film by the same name (I say realistic because it’s all CGI and technically not live action). For the two of you reading this that haven’t seen the […]

20 Jul 19
Cinema Wise

Disney brings us yet another animated classic with an updated version of the same story. Luckily, this time around it’s with a story that is as close to perfect as we can get. The film is a shot for shot remake with wonderful new life brought to the screen. Jon Favreau puts another impressive film […]

20 Jul 19
Ashish R Bedekar

Watch Jon Favreau Talk Using VR To Make The Lion King #VirtualReality #VR via https://t.co/lCMXxMFK9F https://t.co/Svv3FO9ug8 — Ashish Bedekar (@ashishrbedekar) July 20, 2019 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/ashishrbedekar July 20, 2019 at 07:56AM via IFTTT

20 Jul 19
The Indian Perspective

The chief reason to give this live-action remake a chance is to marvel at the sheer artistry at display. via Top Movies News- News18.com https://ift.tt/2YeIFcT

20 Jul 19
SRIVASTAVA RITIK

The chief reason to give this live-action remake a chance is to marvel at the sheer artistry at display. from Top Movies News- News18.com https://ift.tt/2YeIFcT

20 Jul 19
ComicBook Debate

How do you match the greatest animated film of all time? 2019’s The Lion King proves it is no easy task. Despite that, strong voice performances and staying close to the source makes the final product an enjoyable experience. The Lion King, directed by Jon Favreau and starting the strong cast of James Earl Jones […]

20 Jul 19
Cinema Sense

Naaaaaants ingonnnyaaaaaama bagiiiiithi babaaaa. If you’re at all familiar with The Lion King, hopefully you sang along to that opening as I did. Just like 1994’s animated counterpart, Disney’s 2019 remake opens with a sunrise over the African savannah. It includes the same familiar songs, iconic images, and quotable lines of dialogue as the original – […]

19 Jul 19
Naman's Movie reviews

With Dumbo and Aladdin in the same calendar year already, it is clear that Disney is doubling down on their live-action remakes. This time, it’s arguably Disney’s most beloved animated film, the Lion King. Jon Favreau, the director of Iron Man and The Jungle Book, once again helms the latest Disney remake. FYI, this is […]

19 Jul 19
The Irish Sun
THE secrets of the Lion King’s live action remake have been revealed by Disney with director Jon Favreau saying it had to “feel like it’s 2019”. The director has said that the cast and crew envisioned a “very modern” story for the new version of the tale. The new version was keen to recreate classic shots of the original Simba was designed on a real life lion cub for the new version Favreau said that in the 25 yeas since the original film was released, the comedy has dated and he also said the casting and authenticity of the project had to feel up to date. The filmmaker, who was also behind the updated version of The Jungle Book, has said he felt a responsibility to honour the original material. He said: “I think the whole thing has to feel like it’s 2019. “Whether it’s the music, the casting, the visual effects, the way we really try to embrace the authenticity of what inspired the original. Then letting the comedy be updated too, and make that feel modern, because that’s one of the areas where I felt 25 years, you felt the difference.” Scar looks far more evil in the live action remake He was more comedy evil in the original Beyonce voices Nala in the film   Favreau has said that he wanted the film to both feel new and like the original version. He said he wanted the audience response to be: “Even though this is a new movie, I did see the Lion King.” He added: “Then hopefully the new generation goes back and looks at the old version too.” Favreau also said that he did not want the audience to miss out on a new experience, wanting to ensure: “It didn’t just feel like, ‘I should have just watched the cartoon’, that this is something that’s building upon something I already love.” There is an A-list cast voicing the Disney movie He accomplished it with a series of moments to pay homage to the original, which is loosely based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet, including recreating iconic moments like Simba, Timon and Pumbaa being silhouetted against the moon. Production designer James Chinlund said: “That’s sacred terrain. You can’t not do that.” They also filmed in Kenya to visualise the scenes and make them as realistic as possible with things like the right shade and shape of rocks, the colour of the sunrise and even the depth of the colours in the plants. The team also travelled to Namibia to get a feel of where the iconic stampede scene would take place in real life. [bc_video video_id=”6044465025001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”New Lion King teaser trailer sees Beyoncé appear as Nala the lion”] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN TV & SHOWBIZ” posts_category=”169″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Favreau added: “There’s a common acceptance that this is how nature looks. So we’re trying to import that sense of realism by borrowing their techniques.” The team also assembled an A-list cast to voice the movie with Beyonce, Seth Rogen and Chiwetel Ejiofor in starring roles. But to make the computer animated animals as realistic as possible the filmakers teamed up with the animal scene department at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in Florida to record the natural movements of three quarters of all the animal species that would appear on screen. The Lion King is released Friday in the UK. Got a story? email digishowbiz@the-sun.co.uk or call us direct on 02077824220. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
19 Jul 19
The Sun
THE secrets of the Lion King’s live action remake have been revealed by Disney with director Jon Favreau saying it had to “feel like it’s 2019”. The director has said that the cast and crew envisioned a “very modern” story for the new version of the tale. The new version was keen to recreate classic shots of the original Simba was designed on a real life lion cub for the new version Favreau said that in the 25 yeas since the original film was released, the comedy has dated and he also said the casting and authenticity of the project had to feel up to date. The filmmaker, who was also behind the updated version of The Jungle Book, has said he felt a responsibility to honour the original material. He said: “I think the whole thing has to feel like it’s 2019. “Whether it’s the music, the casting, the visual effects, the way we really try to embrace the authenticity of what inspired the original. Then letting the comedy be updated too, and make that feel modern, because that’s one of the areas where I felt 25 years, you felt the difference.” Scar looks far more evil in the live action remake He was more comedy evil in the original Beyonce voices Nala in the film   Favreau has said that he wanted the film to both feel new and like the original version. He said he wanted the audience response to be: “Even though this is a new movie, I did see the Lion King.” He added: “Then hopefully the new generation goes back and looks at the old version too.” Favreau also said that he did not want the audience to miss out on a new experience, wanting to ensure: “It didn’t just feel like, ‘I should have just watched the cartoon’, that this is something that’s building upon something I already love.” There is an A-list cast voicing the Disney movie He accomplished it with a series of moments to pay homage to the original, which is loosely based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet, including recreating iconic moments like Simba, Timon and Pumbaa being silhouetted against the moon. Production designer James Chinlund said: “That’s sacred terrain. You can’t not do that.” They also filmed in Kenya to visualise the scenes and make them as realistic as possible with things like the right shade and shape of rocks, the colour of the sunrise and even the depth of the colours in the plants. The team also travelled to Namibia to get a feel of where the iconic stampede scene would take place in real life. [bc_video video_id=”6044465025001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”New Lion King teaser trailer sees Beyoncé appear as Nala the lion”] [article-rail-section title=”MOST READ IN TV & SHOWBIZ” posts_category=”325″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] Favreau added: “There’s a common acceptance that this is how nature looks. So we’re trying to import that sense of realism by borrowing their techniques.” The team also assembled an A-list cast to voice the movie with Beyonce, Seth Rogen and Chiwetel Ejiofor in starring roles. But to make the computer animated animals as realistic as possible the filmakers teamed up with the animal scene department at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in Florida to record the natural movements of three quarters of all the animal species that would appear on screen. The Lion King is released Friday in the UK. Got a story? email digishowbiz@the-sun.co.uk or call us direct on 02077824220. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
19 Jul 19
GEEKS OF COLOR

The light is crowning over the horizon as Jon Favreau’s highly anticipated adaptation of The Lion King begins to rollout into theaters this week. Following last week’s press screening, we were honored to sit with the star-studded cast and pick their minds regarding the process of reimagining the Disney classic. Seeing the cast all together […]

19 Jul 19
Perry The Cinema Psycho

When The Lion King came out in 1994 it quickly took the world by storm. It was just the heartwarming story that grabbed the attention of its viewers, but also the incredibly innovative animation for the time. It blended classic hand-drawn animation with 3D animation beautifully and for that reason and others, it was extremely successful in […]

19 Jul 19

The Lion King is another classic Disney animation that’s getting remade in live-action form. Does this even compare to the 1994 original? Here’s my full review!

19 Jul 19
GoldDerby
Why did Disney remake the 1994 animated classic “The Lion King” into a 2019 CGI spectacle? Probably for the same reason they remade their animated hits “Beauty and the Beast,” “Dumbo” and “Aladdin” — to cash in again on their intellectual property for additional profits. But double-dipping sometimes pays off artistically: critics generally admired the 2015 version of “Cinderella” and the 2016 remake of “The Jungle Book,” and both were Oscar contenders, with “Jungle Book” winning for its visual effects. So how does “Lion King” fare by comparison? It depends on who you ask. Critics are divided, resulting in a MetaCritic score of 55 based on 47 reviews counted as of this writing — 19 positive, 23 mixed and just 5 outright negative. And over on Rotten Tomatoes it has a freshness rating of 56% based on 232 reviews so far, with 130 thumbs up and 102 thumbs down. The RT critics’ consensus says, “While it can take pride in its visual achievements, ‘The Lion King’ is a by-the-numbers retelling that lacks the energy and heart that made the original so beloved — though for some fans that may just be enough.” [pmc-related-link href=”https://pages.email.goldderby.com/signup/” type=”SIGN UP” target=”_self”]for Gold Derby’s free newsletter with latest predictions[/pmc-related-link] Critics agree about the technical marvel of its visuals, saying it has the “photorealism” of a nature documentary like “Planet Earth” — “you expect David Attenborough to start narrating at any moment.” Director Jon Favreau, who also made the “Jungle Book” remake, “lavishes care on the look of the film,” but since all the CGI means the movie is nearly as animated as the original, and since the story doesn’t deviate, there’s also more concern over whether this particular remake justifies its existence. “It’s hard to say why it’s needed,” and hearing the same songs and dialogue come from more realistic animals is “distinctly jarring.” What do you think of the critics’ responses? Check out a few of the reviews below, and join the discussion on this and more with your fellow movie fans here in our forums. [pmc-related-link href=”https://www.goldderby.com/article/2019/beyonce-spirit-music-video-the-lion-king-blue-ivy-carter-news/” type=”SEE” target=”_self”]Beyonce ‘Spirit’ music video: ‘The Lion King’ anthem accompanied by African dancers and Bey’s daughter [WATCH][/pmc-related-link] Leah Greenblatt (Entertainment Weekly): “2019’s ‘Lion King’ is a marvel of photorealism from the first frame, nearly indistinguishable from the real real; it looks like Netflix’s ‘Planet Earth,’ if gazelles could share watering holes with their natural predators, and zebras semi-regularly broke into song … And [director Jon Favreau] (or more accurately, an untold collective of studio wizardry) lavishes care on the look of the film.” Samantha Incorvaia (Arizona Republic): “Overall, it’s a wonderful movie that is sure to bring back memories and inspire chills that go down your entire body. Audiences are going to have fun. However, there are moments that don’t connect, which is surprising because of how engaging the highs are … Despite minor hiccups, it really comes down to an entertaining time with no worries — er, ‘Hakuna Matata.'” Helen O’Hara (Empire): “The immediate and overwhelming impression is so life-like that you expect David Attenborough to start narrating at any moment … The big problem with this photo-realism, however, is that animal mouths are not designed for words, and their faces do not express human emotion. What we gain in realism we lose in expression … it’s distinctly jarring when these cats speak, and even more when they break into song.” Alissa Wilkinson (Vox): “While a new generation of children will surely be charmed by this version of ‘Lion King,’ it’s hard to say why it’s needed when the first one already exists. And it’s a good example of why Disney’s mass porting of its famous animated properties over to live action, while lucrative and largely harmless, is still not doing anyone — other than Disney — any favors.”