Judith Williams

24 Jun 19
East Bay Times
[cq comment=”Judy, I’ve copied and pasted this edited 6/21 version of ONTAP from Saxo below. All the formatting was lost, but I’ve reformatted what was left of it after deleting a couple items that’ll be out dated by 6/28 and rearranging the items so that each item in the same place appears under the one before it. What I’m trying to avoid is having to keep rewriting the same headlines every week to fit properly on the page, and also having to fix any recurring errors each week – nj”]BRENTWOOD ‘Annie’ set to open in July “Annie,” one of the top 25 musicals of all time, is coming to the East Bay on June 28 thanks to Brentwood’s Broadway Repertory Theater. The uplifting musical chronicles the life of an 11-year-old orphan named Annie, as she steps out of the orphanage to seek her parents who left her there 10 years ago.  Mackenzie Brain, of Walnut Creek, stars as Annie in Broadway Repertory Theater’s production of the same name from June 28-30 in Antioch and July 5-6 in Walnut Creek. (Broadway Repertory Theater) The show, which ran on Broadway, has also been made into several movies throughout the years, with stars like Carol Burnett and Audra McDonald. Broadway Repertory Theater has distinguished itself as an East Bay regional theater company who draws talent from all over the Bay Area, The cast of “Annie” consists of actors from Oakland, Castro Valley, Livermore, Martinez, besides those from Brentwood, Oakley and Discovery Bay. The atmosphere at Broadway Repertory Theater is one of extreme excellence in performance, but achieved in a nurturing environment. The performances will be June 28-29 at 7:30 p.m. and June 30 at 3 p.m. at the Deer Valley High School theater.  The next week, July 5-6 at 7:30 p.m. and July 8 at 3 p.m. at The Lesher Arts Center in Walnut Creek. All ticket inks and info on how to volunteer may be found at www.BroadwayRepertoryTheater.com  or call 925-516-9009. Delta Gallery hosts summer art classes Delta Gallery Community Art Center in Brentwood kicks off its summer season with a fresh new line-up of art classes for children, teens and adults at the Delta Gallery, where students are surrounded by the inspiration of colorful, multi-media art exhibits and the instructors are all professional artists. Classes for kids include Summer Art Camps with instructor Jo Olney, and Kids’ Oil Painting Workshops with Carol Ligon. Nancy Roberts will teach her popular themed classes, Acrylic Painting for Young Artists, Fantasy Art and Paint Play. Workshops for adults and teens include Dreaming in Color: Acrylic Painting with instructor Keta Greig, Embarking on Soft Pastel Painting and Exploring Watercolor Painting, both with Karen Nelson Kelly, How to Draw…?, a colored pencil workshop with Peggy Magovern, Jewelry Stringing with Nancy Hoover, Oil Expressions with Carol Ligon, Open Studio with Jo Olney and Pocket Sketch on the Go with Paulette Lagana. For class details and registration, visit deltagallery.com/classes-and-workshops. Delta Gallery Community Art Center is in the Streets of Brentwood shopping center, 2485 Sand Creek Road, Suite 128, Brentwood. Call 925-516-5935. [cq comment=”BRENTWOOD”]Liberty High singers reunion set for June 29 All Liberty High School singers who studied under director Susan Stuart from 1977-2011 are invited to a reunion from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 29. The reunion, the group’s third one, will be at the LDS Church, 1875 Highland Way. Former singers will spend the day making music together, just as they have done in the past. Wear a Liberty Singers shirt and bring a lunch, Stuart suggests. More information and list of music to purchase can be found at FB.com/lhsalumnichoir or Google Liberty Singers Alumni Choir. Many scrapbooks will be auctioned off with the proceeds to benefit the Stuart Music Fund. [cq comment=”BRENTWOOD”]Starry Nights concerts Fridays in park Starry Nights in Brentwood summer concert series continues on July 12 at City Park, 710 Second St. The show is from 7 to 9 p.m. All patrons are asked to follow park rules before, during and after concerts. Ample parking is available in the parking garage. Bring your blanket, chairs and a picnic dinner and enjoy this free event. Other concerts are set for July 19 and 26, and Aug. 2, 9, 16 and 23. For more information, call 925-516-5444. ANTIOCH Play auditions set for ‘Rebel’ and ‘Beast’ Madd Hatter Players will host auditions for “Rebel Without a Cause” and “Beauty and the Beast” on July 9 and 11 at the American Legion (Veterans Memorial) Auditorium, 403 W. Sixth St., Antioch. Auditions will include cold readings from a script. Auditioners should bring a head shot or photo if they have one. The setting for the “Rebel Without a Cause” show will be set in the 1950s with period costumes, hairdos and makeup. Rehearsals will be 7-9 Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sunday evenings. The play is geared for those 13 and older and will be staged in late August. For the younger crowd, those 7 and older, there’s “Beauty and the Beast,” which will be performed in early August. Frank Ballesteros directs. PITTSBURG PCT hosts 40th anniversary celebration Pittsburg Community Theatre will host a 40th Anniversary Gala and kickoff of the 2019-2020 season on June 29 at the California Theatre, 351 Railroad Ave. The festivities include the opportunity to sample hors d’oeuvres and desserts from local restaurants and chefs, imbibe at the cash bar (hosted by Pittsburg Arts and Community Foundation), bid on and win any one of our wonderful gift baskets, prizes and goodies donated by local businesses and patrons and enjoy an evening of songs from PCT’s past (and a sneak peak into our future) featuring several of PCT’s favorite performers through the years. The evening also features a special presentation honoring PCT Founder Betty Brown and many original members of the company, culminating with a champagne toast. Doors at 6:30 p.m., performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 a person—general seating; $35 per person—reserved cabaret table seating. For tickets, call the California Theatre Box Office at 925-427-1611 or go online to www.PittsburgCaliforniaTheatre.com. LIVERMORE Tickets on sale for Bankhead’s upcoming season Presale tickets are now available for The Bankhead Presents’ 2019-2020 season, which includes live performances of every genre, classic films and a new speaker series. If you’re a member, just log in and pick your favorites. Not a member? You can join today and get the opportunity for member resale tickets. Highlights among the nearly four dozen events scheduled through May 2020 are country hit makers Lonestar and Phil Vassar, Texican rock group Los Lonely Boys, folk legend Arlo Guthrie, comedian Rita Rudner, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, singer/songwriter Joan Osborne, Broadway star Lea Salonga, A Charlie Brown Christmas Live! on Stage, and the mesmerizing dance group MOMIX. Kicking off the season will be the Brilliance at the Bankhead Gala featuring song and dance star Matthew Morrison, best known as Mr. Schuester from the television hit “Glee.” He will be accompanied by Livermore-Amador Symphony. Events are held at the Livermore Performing Arts Center. For a copy of the season brochure, go to flipsnack.com/LVPAC/season-2019-2020-brochure.html. [cq comment=”LIVERMORE”]’Art & Wine Intertwined’ June 29 at the Bankhead “Art & Wine Intertwined” will open the doors of the Bankhead Theater in the center of downtown Livermore on June 29 for a casual summer wine tasting, marking the end of June. Local offerings from McGrail Vineyards, Boa Ventura Vineyards, White Crane Winery, and Mia Nipote will be featured. The lively jazz music of Wombo Combo with Andrew Mathers will enliven the afternoon event. Currently on display in the Bankhead Gallery is “Go Figure,” an exhibit celebrating the diversity of spirit, style, and emotion expressed in the human figure through the eyes of 26 artists. A concurrent exhibit in the Founders Room, adjacent to the Bankhead lobby, are six original works by E. Trent Thompson from his “Pictures for People” project. His large-scale works were designed to highlight the needs of others in the community and the sale of the project’s pieces raised funds to support local organizations that help people in need. This will be the last week to enjoy “Go Figure” before it closes July 7 to make way for a new exhibit. Many pieces are available for sale and purchase arrangements can be made during the event. Hosted by Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center, “Art & Wine Intertwined” is free and open to the public. Tastings are $2 each or three for $5 and light appetizers will be served. The event runs from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. CONTRA COSTA COUNTY Poison Apple Productions awarded grant for $16,200 The California Arts Council has awarded a $16,200 grant to Poison Apple Productions as part of its Youth Arts Action program. Youth Arts Action supports projects for youth from infancy through age 24 that operate outside of school time, in artistic venues and community settings as well as on school sites. This program encourages relevant, dynamic, and innovative community building and learning through youth-focused arts and culture projects. With support from the California Arts Council, Poison Apple Productions will expand and enhance its Apple Academy Educational Theatre Program, a graduated series of performance-based classes for youth and young adults from ages 2-24. This grant would help maintain the high quality of the programs and shows produced, hire quality teaching artists, provide scholarships for underprivileged youth, and support program internships. Poison Apple Productions is one of 244 grantees chosen for the Youth Arts Action program. The award was featured as part of a larger announcement from the California Arts Council, with grant funds totaling a projected $24,508,541 for 2018-19, the highest investment in statewide arts programming since the 2000-01 fiscal year. For more information, go to poisonappleproductions.org. WALNUT CREEK Valley Art Gallery shows ‘Around and About Diablo’ The Valley Art Gallery’s concludes “Around and About Diablo” at the gallery on June 29. The exhibit features 36 choices of artistic interpretation of the beauty of the iconic Devil Mountain and the vibrancy of the surrounding area. Valley Art Gallery is a volunteer-run, nonprofit organization that has been representing artists of the Bay Area since 1949. The gallery is at 1661 Botelho Drive, Suite 110. Go to valleyartgallery.org or call 925-935-4311. [cq comment=”Walnut Creek”]Festival Opera presents ‘Susannah’ Festival Opera will present Carlisle Floyd’s “Susannah” at 8 p.m. July 12 and 2 p.m. July 14 at the Lesher Center for the Arts, 1601 Civic Drive. Dubbed as “an American tale of innocence, lust, and social consequence,” the opera centers on the main character, 18-year-old Susannah Polk, a typical teenager entering womanhood in the quiet mountain town of New Hope, Tenn., when she finds herself bereft of hope as she becomes the target of ruthless and malicious gossip. In his seminal opera, Carlisle Floyd revisits the Apocryphal tale of Susanna and the Elders, but transports the story to his own familiar universe — the American South of the 1950s during a time of profound social change. The nation was gripped by intense fear during the McCarthy era, when making accusations without evidence was common practice, while the feminist and civil rights movements were also gaining momentum. More than six decades since its premiere, Floyd’s Susannah now stands as one of the most beloved American operas. Shana Blake Hill stars as Susannah Polk. Make Foehringer directs, Bryan Nies conducts and William Sauerland is the chorusmaster. For tickets, call 925-943-7469 or go to https://lesherartscenter.showare.com/  DANVILLE ‘Reflections’ art exhibit at Blackhawk Gallery till June 30 The Alamo Danville Artists’ Society hosts Blackhawk Gallery’s new exhibit “Reflections.” The exhibit will be on view seven days a week through June 30. The “Reflections” exhibit features one guest artist and 40 member artists. Guest artist Aimee Bosschart will be showing her hand-built ceramics. Members’ artworks include paintings, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, photographs, and wearable art. The Alamo Danville Artists’ Society will host the opening of gallery’s new exhibit “Captivation” on July 6 with a gala reception from 5 to 7 p.m., with wine and hors d’ oeuvres. The exhibit will be on view seven days a week from July 5 to Sept. 8. The reception and exhibit are free and open to the public. The “Captivation” exhibit features one guest artist and 40 member artists. Guest artist Karen Sanford will be showing her functional pottery. Members’ artworks include paintings, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, photographs, and wearable art. The Blackhawk Gallery is at 3416 Blackhawk Plaza Circle in the Blackhawk Plaza. Call 925-648-8023. — Do you have an area arts or entertainment item to submit? Reach Judith Prieve at jprieve@bayareanewsgroup.com.
24 Jun 19
Natchitoches Parish Journal

One thousand one hundred and thirty-one students were named to the Spring 2019 Dean’s List at Northwestern State University. Students on the list earned a grade point average of between 3.5 and 3.99. Those named to the Dean’s List by hometown (in Natchitoches Parish and surrounding areas) are as follows. Alexandria — Marquita Benjamin, Morgan […]

24 Jun 19
Noticias Ultimas

Estados Unidos busca formas clandestinas para disuadir a Irán La inteligencia estadounidense y los oficiales militares están trabajando para contrarrestar la agresión iraní en el Golfo Pérsico sin escalar las tensiones hacia una guerra convencional total, de acuerdo con los funcionarios actuales y anteriores. Esos esfuerzos incluyen operaciones similares a los ataques cibernéticos estadounidenses de […]

24 Jun 19
EILE Magazine

(Reuters) – Ukrainian politicians and foreign diplomats joined thousands marching in a gay Pride parade in Kiev on Sunday, the biggest and most peaceful ever in the former Soviet country. Crowds of people, many dressed in bright colours, paraded along streets in the centre of the Ukrainian capital, holding up banners saying: ‘Diversity is beautiful’, […]

24 Jun 19
William Chasterson

Her steamy bestselling novels feature young, beautiful heroines meeting rich, handsome men. from BBC News – World https://bbc.in/2IDeFPf via IFTTT

23 Jun 19
News Directory

I am Aleksandr V. Radionov and Yekaterina K. Radionova to Laura R. Butman, 241 Meadow St., $ 185,000. Douglas H. Dreyer and Donna M. Dreyer with Christopher Michael Izzo, Melissa Lee Izzo and Melanie A. Sapelli, 12-14 Orlando Street, $ 285,000. Janet F. Platosz and Janet F. Bonfitto with Kathleen B. Searles, 157 Corey Colonial, […]

23 Jun 19
nguyệt trinh

Canada-NYC road trip — về NYC — Xong, những ngày vui ngắn ngủi qua thật mau. Ta sẽ giữ mãi ~ kỷ niệm đẹp này, có các em ta đồng hành. Có những đoạn đường, có những thị trấn, có những thành phố mỗi lúc mỗi lùi dần, càng lúc càng xa, để rồi bị […]

23 Jun 19
Nord on Art

“You’re here to see the Caravaggio?” said the guard at Adam Williams Fine Art, a private art gallery on East 80th Street on Manhattan’s Upper East Side one block from the treasure-filled Metropolitan Museum of Art. Billed as one of the greatest Old Master painting discoveries in decades, one would have expected a line out […]

23 Jun 19
News Archives Uk

Agawam Aleksandr V. Radionov and Yekaterina K. Radionova to Laura R. Butman, 241 Meadow St., $ 185,000. Douglas H. Dreyer and Donna M. Dreyer to Christopher Michael Izzo, Melissa Lee Izzo and Melanie A. Sapelli, 12-14 Orlando St., $ 285,000. Janet F. Platosz and Janet F. Bonfitto to Kathleen B. Searles, 157 Corey Colonial, Unit […]

23 Jun 19
Iowa Climate Science Education

by Judith Curry On Tuesday June 25, I will be testifying before the House Oversight and Reform Environmental Subcommittee in a Hearing on Recovery, Resilience and Readiness – Contending with Natural Disasters in the Wake of Climate Change. The announcement for the Hearing is posted [here].  The Hearing starts at 2 pm EDT.  Based on […]

23 Jun 19
Climate Etc.

by Judith Curry On Tuesday June 25, I will be testifying before the House Oversight and Reform Environmental Subcommittee in a Hearing on Recovery, Resilience and Readiness – Contending with Natural Disasters in the Wake of Climate Change.

23 Jun 19
Global News

Ukrainian politicians and foreign diplomats joined thousands marching in a gay pride parade in Kyiv on Sunday, the biggest and most peaceful ever in the former Soviet country.

23 Jun 19
National Post

KIEV — Ukrainian politicians and foreign diplomats joined thousands marching in a gay pride parade in Kiev on Sunday, the biggest and most peaceful ever in the former Soviet country. Crowds of people, many dressed in bright colors, paraded along streets in the center of the Ukrainian capital, holding up banners saying “Diversity is beautiful,” […]

23 Jun 19
Press Telegram
In the past, the right, notably the segment affiliated with religious belief, was closely associated with censorship and control of thought. Today, enforced orthodoxy derives primarily from the left, emboldened by near total control of the media, university curricula and cultural products. Remarkably, a recent study by the Atlantic found that “the most politically intolerant Americans” tend be white, highly educated urban progressives. Conservatives may have once driven intolerance from the pulpit and the press, but they no longer have the ability to exercise thought control in a meaningful way. Long ago, religious zealots embraced feudal ideals, but increasingly it’s the ultra-secular progressives who reprise the role of Medieval Inquisitors. This move toward leftist orthodoxy is not unprecedented. McCarthyism in the 1950s may have been cruelly inquisitional, but not nearly as totalitarian as Stalinism. Unfortunately, it is largely on the left that we find the authoritarian demand for unanimity on virtually all issues. Progressivism’s feudal turn At the heart of intolerance lies with the notion of “absolute truth.” Traditionally, Western liberalism embraced the ideal of healthy debate and interchange about values and objectives. Liberals and conservatives alike took empiricism and rationality seriously. Today these ideals are being undermined by a fevered rush to reject empiricism and complexity. “There’s a lot of people more concerned about being precisely, factually, and semantically correct than about being morally right,” suggests the left’s super-star Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez . This emphasis on intent and “morality” reflects a more Medieval attitude than that of a reasoned politics that grows from facts and evidence. As in the Middle Ages, the new progressives often seek to impose a secular version of the imperial theocracy. Like the Medieval Catholic Church, new school progressives often exhibit hostility to the roots of our own past, whether verities contained in Shakespeare, the writings of the founders or even the notion of disinterested jurisprudence. In the new fundamentalism, as in the old, there can be only one set of truths, while all others are viewed as evil. The green religion The globally ascendant environmental movement follows the Medieval script perhaps more than any element on the left. Theirs is also a movement defined by imminent apocalypse, with mankind’s fate doomed by natural disasters, like fires, sea level rise, or even unusual weather brought about by our own sinfulness. There’s increasingly little debate even about the best ways to address climate issues without undermining the economy. Today, even distinguished skeptics deeply concerned about the impact of manmade warming such as veteran climate scientists like Roger Pielke and Judith Curry or economist Bjorn Lonborg have been essentially driven out from most mainstream media. No longer willing to countenance any dissent, many scientific associations have become open advocates for a particular climate agenda. Modern media all too often reflect what the RAND Corporation calls “truth decay,” that is, substituting assertion over evidence, if evidence diverges from the accepted narrative embraced by journalists. There is, for example, a refusal to confront the long history of exaggerations in environmental prophecies — dating back at least to the late 1960s. But whenever the apocalypse fails to appear at its appointed time, the green priesthood simply pushes the timeline further out again, knowing full well the media will not report on their misleading prognostications. The Inquisition of the Enlightened There’s a price paid when an influential part of society embraces a kind of fundamentalist hysteria reminiscent of the grassroots religious movements common in the Middle East and also plagued Medieval Catholicism. The New Yorker’s Benjamin Wallace-Wells is just the latest climatista to suggest that constitutional democracy as we know it may not be up to meeting the apocalyptic challenge. In many places, the worst intolerance pertains to issues relating to gender or race. Holding up the banner of social justice, campus activists have ejected liberal values for those of Mao’s Red Guards, chasing those with differing ideas, including distinguished professors, off campus, as recently occurred at both Harvard and Cambridge. These tendencies are hardly weakened by the fact that so many college administrations — Oberlin, Evergreen College , Williams — have not only tolerated assaults on those considered, often falsely, as racist or sexist, but seem to embrace them. Some progressives such as Cass Sunstein fear that students raised in current homogeneous college environment “are less likely to get a good education, and faculty members are likely to learn less from one another, if there is a prevailing political orthodoxy. A recent survey of first year reading assignments at 350 schools by the National Association of Scholars found that most are now dominated by contemporary authors, usually focused on progressive topics like racism, Islamophobia, or gender issues. Not on the reading list: Pretty much anyone who wrote before 2000, including Homer, Confucius, Shakespeare, Milton, de Tocqueville, V.S. Naipul or the Founding Fathers. Given their muddled elders, it’s not surprising that many millennials reject the ideal of free and open expression. In 2017, 43 percent of college students approved the banning of extreme speakers, twice the number in 1984. Over two-thirds of older Americans believe that it is extremely important to live in a democracy; but among millennials, less than one-third do. The technological threat [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Free speech’s future prospects are not made brighter by an internet controlled by a handful of tech oligarchs. Nearly two-thirds of readers now get their news through Facebook and Google; as those tech companies systematically destroy the economics of the news business, their dominance will only grow, particularly among the young. Based largely in the Bay Area — a hotbed of progressive sentiment — these firms use algorithms to suppress anything they find mildly disturbing. This has already resulted in the mass de-platforming of largely conservative voices on outlets such as Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube and Twitter. The power over information wielded by the oligarchs, the shaping of the next generation by the progressive professoriate and cultural clerisy represent a clear danger to the future of free thought. It will take a concerted effort by people of good will, both left and right, to demand a return to appreciation of the great thinkers of the past and humankind’s beautiful diversity of thought. We can’t let our cultural legacy be squelched by today’s inquisitors. Joel Kotkin is the R.C. Hobbs Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange and executive director of the Houston-based Center for Opportunity Urbanism (www.opportunityurbanism.org).
23 Jun 19
Pasadena Star News
In the past, the right, notably the segment affiliated with religious belief, was closely associated with censorship and control of thought. Today, enforced orthodoxy derives primarily from the left, emboldened by near total control of the media, university curricula and cultural products. Remarkably, a recent study by the Atlantic found that “the most politically intolerant Americans” tend be white, highly educated urban progressives. Conservatives may have once driven intolerance from the pulpit and the press, but they no longer have the ability to exercise thought control in a meaningful way. Long ago, religious zealots embraced feudal ideals, but increasingly it’s the ultra-secular progressives who reprise the role of Medieval Inquisitors. This move toward leftist orthodoxy is not unprecedented. McCarthyism in the 1950s may have been cruelly inquisitional, but not nearly as totalitarian as Stalinism. Unfortunately, it is largely on the left that we find the authoritarian demand for unanimity on virtually all issues. Progressivism’s feudal turn At the heart of intolerance lies with the notion of “absolute truth.” Traditionally, Western liberalism embraced the ideal of healthy debate and interchange about values and objectives. Liberals and conservatives alike took empiricism and rationality seriously. Today these ideals are being undermined by a fevered rush to reject empiricism and complexity. “There’s a lot of people more concerned about being precisely, factually, and semantically correct than about being morally right,” suggests the left’s super-star Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez . This emphasis on intent and “morality” reflects a more Medieval attitude than that of a reasoned politics that grows from facts and evidence. As in the Middle Ages, the new progressives often seek to impose a secular version of the imperial theocracy. Like the Medieval Catholic Church, new school progressives often exhibit hostility to the roots of our own past, whether verities contained in Shakespeare, the writings of the founders or even the notion of disinterested jurisprudence. In the new fundamentalism, as in the old, there can be only one set of truths, while all others are viewed as evil. The green religion The globally ascendant environmental movement follows the Medieval script perhaps more than any element on the left. Theirs is also a movement defined by imminent apocalypse, with mankind’s fate doomed by natural disasters, like fires, sea level rise, or even unusual weather brought about by our own sinfulness. There’s increasingly little debate even about the best ways to address climate issues without undermining the economy. Today, even distinguished skeptics deeply concerned about the impact of manmade warming such as veteran climate scientists like Roger Pielke and Judith Curry or economist Bjorn Lonborg have been essentially driven out from most mainstream media. No longer willing to countenance any dissent, many scientific associations have become open advocates for a particular climate agenda. Modern media all too often reflect what the RAND Corporation calls “truth decay,” that is, substituting assertion over evidence, if evidence diverges from the accepted narrative embraced by journalists. There is, for example, a refusal to confront the long history of exaggerations in environmental prophecies — dating back at least to the late 1960s. But whenever the apocalypse fails to appear at its appointed time, the green priesthood simply pushes the timeline further out again, knowing full well the media will not report on their misleading prognostications. The Inquisition of the Enlightened There’s a price paid when an influential part of society embraces a kind of fundamentalist hysteria reminiscent of the grassroots religious movements common in the Middle East and also plagued Medieval Catholicism. The New Yorker’s Benjamin Wallace-Wells is just the latest climatista to suggest that constitutional democracy as we know it may not be up to meeting the apocalyptic challenge. In many places, the worst intolerance pertains to issues relating to gender or race. Holding up the banner of social justice, campus activists have ejected liberal values for those of Mao’s Red Guards, chasing those with differing ideas, including distinguished professors, off campus, as recently occurred at both Harvard and Cambridge. These tendencies are hardly weakened by the fact that so many college administrations — Oberlin, Evergreen College , Williams — have not only tolerated assaults on those considered, often falsely, as racist or sexist, but seem to embrace them. Some progressives such as Cass Sunstein fear that students raised in current homogeneous college environment “are less likely to get a good education, and faculty members are likely to learn less from one another, if there is a prevailing political orthodoxy. A recent survey of first year reading assignments at 350 schools by the National Association of Scholars found that most are now dominated by contemporary authors, usually focused on progressive topics like racism, Islamophobia, or gender issues. Not on the reading list: Pretty much anyone who wrote before 2000, including Homer, Confucius, Shakespeare, Milton, de Tocqueville, V.S. Naipul or the Founding Fathers. Given their muddled elders, it’s not surprising that many millennials reject the ideal of free and open expression. In 2017, 43 percent of college students approved the banning of extreme speakers, twice the number in 1984. Over two-thirds of older Americans believe that it is extremely important to live in a democracy; but among millennials, less than one-third do. The technological threat [related_articles location=”left” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-section”]Free speech’s future prospects are not made brighter by an internet controlled by a handful of tech oligarchs. Nearly two-thirds of readers now get their news through Facebook and Google; as those tech companies systematically destroy the economics of the news business, their dominance will only grow, particularly among the young. Based largely in the Bay Area — a hotbed of progressive sentiment — these firms use algorithms to suppress anything they find mildly disturbing. This has already resulted in the mass de-platforming of largely conservative voices on outlets such as Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube and Twitter. The power over information wielded by the oligarchs, the shaping of the next generation by the progressive professoriate and cultural clerisy represent a clear danger to the future of free thought. It will take a concerted effort by people of good will, both left and right, to demand a return to appreciation of the great thinkers of the past and humankind’s beautiful diversity of thought. We can’t let our cultural legacy be squelched by today’s inquisitors. Joel Kotkin is the R.C. Hobbs Presidential Fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange and executive director of the Houston-based Center for Opportunity Urbanism (www.opportunityurbanism.org).