Kapalua

09 Dec 18
Luxury Travel Diary

Ritz Carlton hotels and resorts offer some of the best luxury hotels and resorts in the world. It is easy to get a discount, special offer, free benefits and ultimately the cheapest rate. We share how to get the best deal on your next Ritz Carlton hotel stay. In a nutshell, never, ever book on […]

05 Dec 18
Marlo's Portfolio

Mea Makamae Ranch, Maui Haiku Sanctuary, Maui 3032 S. Kihei Rd., Maui 199 Plantation Club Dr. Kapalua, Maui

04 Dec 18
sueatthebeach

An Amazing Helicopter Flight in Maui It was difficult getting sunrise photos from our balcony location but this morning we were up early enough to get a few photos of the pool area in the morning just as the sun was rising higher in the sky. It really has a beautiful setting. We heard this […]

03 Dec 18
Luxury Retreats Magazine
Between the private pools, the neighboring golf courses, the ocean views, and of course, the lanais, these homes embody the magic of Maui vacation rentals with their charming hospitality and local feel. All are so comfortable and private, that any of these villas can easily become your home away from home. Wailea’s Andaz Four Bedroom Villa Sleeps 10 Amid the frenzy of South Maui’s massive luxury resort community — the 1,500-acre ocean-view Wailea — sits the Andaz, a high-end, country club-style resort. Not only is the 297-room Andaz a quiet alternative to the many 500-plus room hotels in the area, but this property has a modern decor rarely found in these parts. Its simple clean lines, soft color palette, and use of natural materials evokes a feeling just as warm as Hawaii’s island hospitality. Inside Andaz’s private four-bedroom villa, guests can relax on custom-made furniture or under a 1,000-square-foot lanai in the shadows of palm trees and ocean waves. Within the resort, lessons and classes of all kinds are included: snap away at a photography session, mix it up with a mixology class, or strum a tune during a ukulele lesson. And when you’re content to relax by the pool, choose from one of five — three of the pools are staggered one on top of the other, infinity-style, cascading down toward a lagoon pool. The whole pool area provides ocean views, but the tiered setup is a stunning visual in itself. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE ANDAZ Lahaina’s Maluhia Sleeps 4 For an intimate retreat among two couples or a young family, this Lahaina home is the answer. Outdoor dinners under a backyard lanai with a classy alfresco dining setup underneath it are the norm at Maluhia. Just steps away, a swimming pool and hot tub face the ocean, and lounge furniture sets the scene for admiring distant views. From Maluhia’s property, you can lay eyes on small, neighboring islands Lanai and Molokai, a sight that is especially magical as the sun sets behind them in the evening. A pair of stone-carved maiden statues flank either end of the pool, the fountains cheekily depositing water back in (you’ll understand when you see them). Aside from the statues, guests feel rather secluded even in the villa’s outdoor living areas, shaded on both sides by lush gardens, though still leaving room to peek out toward the water. Seclusion and all, you don’t have to go far to explore West Maui; just five minutes in the car gets you to the nearby Baby Beach, a hit among families with small children because of an offshore rocky breakwater line that keeps its water shallow. Ten minutes lands you in the town of Lahaina, where high-end restaurants like Fleetwood’s on Front St. (owned by American drummer Mick Fleetwood) and the artfully-decorated Lahaina Grill line the famous, oceanside Front Street. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE MALUHIA Kihei’s Hale Uluniu Sleeps 6 Life is simple at Hale Uluniu. In the 3,200-square-foot home, wake up each morning in one of three cozy bedrooms, each with its own bathroom, and allow your eyes to adjust to awe-inspiring surroundings. The two top-level rooms each open to their own private balcony with astounding views of the ocean off Maui’s west coast, and the ground floor master suite has sliding doors that open directly to the L-shaped swimming pool. Spend your mornings lazing by the pool, or walk just 100 feet across your yard toward the stunning white sands of the quiet Uluniu Beach — it’s that close. The beach’s quiet stretch of sand is known for sea turtles that occasionally pop their heads up at shore and for spotting humpback whales, so gather some snorkeling equipment and flotation devices, which are provided at the villa for guest use. Nightlife here equals watching the sunset, so in the evening, retreat back to Hale Uluniu, where tiki torches surround the pool to create a classic Hawaiian ambiance. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE HALE ULUNIU Kapalua’s Coral Residence Sleeps 6 Coral Residence is a sophisticated villa with a beach house feel, extensive amenities, and the space of a single-family home. In true Hawaiian fashion, the home opens to a private ocean-facing lanai through wall-to-wall glass doors. As part of Montage Kapalua Bay, a resort on the shores of Maui’s coastline, Coral is a good fit for young families that want to mingle, but who also want their privacy. A typical day at Montage may begin with a delicious coffee procured from the resort’s Mahana Market. Tropical afternoon cocktails are to be enjoyed at Sunset Patio, and a locally-sourced seafood dinner is served at its signature restaurant, Cane & Canoe. Mornings and afternoons may be spent in the water — Coral Residence is steps away from a calm-water beach and the resort pool. Tennis and golf can also be planned, with courts on-site and two championship courses just a short drive away. Those would be Kapalua Golf’s two 18s: the par-73 Plantation Course (consistently ranked among Hawaii’s top courses and the annual host of the PGA Tour’s Sentry Tournament of Champions) and the par-72 Bay Course (host to more than 20 pro tournaments and home to Maui’s only hole to play over the ocean, its 17th). TAKE A LOOK INSIDE CORAL RESIDENCE Napili’s Napili Cove Sleeps 4 You couldn’t get any closer to the ocean if you tried; Napili Cove is nestled right at water’s edge on Maui’s west coast. The shoreline nearest the villa is rocky but swimmable, and the crescent-shaped Napili Beach is less than a mile away. The beach’s calm waters make it a child’s delight, so bring the whole family out for a day spent sunbathing, swimming, and sea-turtle spotting. Rinsing off afterwards can be done courtesy of the home’s outdoor shower. Aside from a family, this rental home easily accommodates two couples; the villa has two bedrooms of equal size, each equipped with an ensuite bathroom and private balcony with an ocean view. From floor to ceiling, touches of wood in both light and dark shades add character in tandem with predominantly white walls. The home’s contemporary aesthetic is enhanced with decorative artwork. The images gracing the walls depict Hawaii’s crystal-clear ocean water and mesmerizing sunset skies. Step outside onto Napili Cove’s ocean-facing deck, built under swaying palm trees, and you have the real thing. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE NAPILI COVE Lahaina’s Hekili Point Sleeps 8 Just four miles south of Lahaina on the west side of Maui island, there’s a tiny community called Olowalu with a population of 80 residents. The settlement was once a place of refuge for offenders against royals, but later became a farming community, then a sugarcane plantation. Now it has one of Hawaii’s most unusual coral reef systems, filled with hundred-year-old large coral heads, a manta ray cleaning station, and a Blacktip reef shark nursery. One of the very few homes in the area is Hekili Point, a 1930s-style luxury home designed by Glenn Mason, an architect known for restoration work, who expertly combined old-style details like double-pitched roofs and eucalyptus floors with state-of-the-art smart-home technology. Mason’s build was inspired by traditional kama’aina architecture, a style dating back to early-1900s Hawaii and characterized by open plan spaces and wide verandahs, which Hekili Point does. The home’s tranquil oceanfront setting includes monkeypod trees (which have extremely broad canopies), extensive lawn space, and views of the West Maui Mountains, plus Molokini, Kahoolawe, and Lanai islands. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE HEKILI POINT Makena’s Hale Makena Sleeps 8 At Hale Makena, you’ll always feel connected with the outdoors. A retractable wall opens up the great room to the pool deck, easily blending indoor and outdoor spaces. Enjoy incredible views of the ocean and other waterfront Makena homes from the infinity pool or the attached hot tub. At sundown (or any time of day, really) mix up Mai Tais at the pool deck’s private cabana bar and start serving. The Villa Manager is happy to arrange surfing lessons, helicopter tours, a private chef, and more. Or, grab a kayak and head down to the beach inlet below, then paddle out for some entertaining whale watching. The home is close — just a five-minute drive — to the bustling town of Wailea, but far more tranquil than that part of the island. Plus this part of Maui is rich in wildlife. Frequently spotted: turtles, eagle rays, and dolphins. You can see the coral reef from the master suite’s balcony, and two other bedrooms also provide ocean views. The four rooms are strategically placed in each of the home’s four corners for ultimate privacy. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE HALE MAKENA
03 Dec 18
Golfweek

Here are the Top 200 Resort Golf Courses in the United States as listed in Golfweek’s 2019 Ultimate Guide. Each course is listed with its location, architect(s), year opened and an average ranking from all the Golfweek Raters who reviewed it: Rank Course  Location Architect(s)  Year opened  Avg. rating 1 Pebble Beach Golf Links Pebble […]

03 Dec 18
sueatthebeach

A Better Day In Maui When we peaked out the patio around 8 am, the construction workers were back at work early on a Sunday morning. Our stay included a buffet breakfast which was very good except it was right under the area where some of the noisy drilling, sawing work was being done and […]

02 Dec 18
Golf Daily Tips

5:34 PM ET NASSAU, Bahamas — Travel is far more an annoyance than downright drudgery for Tiger Woods, who has his own plane and can arrive and depart when he desires, without the hassle of overhead bin restrictions. And surely he has nothing against the tropical locale that is Hawaii, specifically the island of Maui, […]

02 Dec 18
Sports Daily Tips

5:34 PM ET NASSAU, Bahamas — Travel is far more an annoyance than downright drudgery for Tiger Woods, who has his own plane and can arrive and depart when he desires, without the hassle of overhead bin restrictions. And surely he has nothing against the tropical locale that is Hawaii, specifically the island of Maui, […]

28 Nov 18
The Denver Post
NASSAU, Bahamas — The first stop is Sam Snead and his 82 career PGA Tour victories. The ultimate stop is Jack Nicklaus and his 18 majors, the gold standard in golf. Both milestones are now in play for Tiger Woods, which is not to suggest they are within reach. That they are at least a topic of conversation is a victory in itself considering it took four back surgeries — the last one to fuse his lower spine — for Woods to even compete again. And then he took hopes to another level by winning the Tour Championship for his 80th career tour victory. “I know I can win tournaments again,” Woods said Tuesday. His next chance is at the Hero World Challenge this week, an unofficial event that counts only in the world ranking, his bank account and his confidence. More curious is what Woods will do in 2019 and for how much longer. He turns 43 at the end of the year, and with age comes a dose of practical thinking. His expectations are high by his standards. Given the level of attention he draws, the expectations of everyone around him are sure to be much higher. He was asked if he was close to having the same expectations he did 15 years ago. “It’s not the same. It never will be. I’ll never feel that again,” he said. “To be what, 28 years old? Physically, I’ll never be like that. So expectations are different than they used to be, for sure. Now, can I still win? Can I still compete? Yes. Can I do it for the next 20 years? No. Because that’s not realistic.” Indeed, his expectations at the peak of his career were far different. “Just win. Win everything,” he said. “Because I felt like I could.” [related_articles location=”right” show_article_date=”false” article_type=”automatic-primary-tag”] And now he knows he can win again, a process that took two weeks short of a full year. It began in early October a year ago when he posted a short video of a slow, full swing that was the first sign he could return. He was No. 1,199 in the world ranking when he played his holiday event in the Bahamas last year. He twice had a chance to win on the back nine in Florida. He had the lead on Sunday in a major at Carnoustie, and he challenged Brooks Koepka to the finish at Bellerive in the PGA Championship. He went from being a vice captain to a captain’s pick in the Ryder Cup. Woods returns to the Bahamas at No. 13 in the world, which on paper sounds more amazing than it really is because he was so low in the ranking from having played so little that he essentially was starting from scratch. There was no way to go but up. Woods can’t call this his best year because he had 11 years of at least five victories and nine years with at least one major through 2008, when he won his 14th major at Torrey Pines on a left leg that required season-ending surgery after the U.S. Open. But it was special, measured beyond victories. “Probably the most rewarding, because there was a point … I just didn’t know if I would ever do this again,” he said. “You always hear me say, ‘It’s a process.’ But if you look at this entire year, it literally was a process. You saw me have flashes, and then I would rework a few things here and there. Toward the end of the year, I just became more and more consistent as a tournament player again.” It culminated at East Lake, when he beat Justin Rose and then Rory McIlroy in the final group over the last two days to win the Tour Championship. That was the moment that mattered. And then the moment was gone. Never has a victory this big had a shelf life so short. Woods was in Paris the next day as all the attention shifted to the Ryder Cup, which ended with a European victory and Woods failing to win a match. He says he was exhausted from a long summer. Woods qualified for the Bridgestone Invitational at Firestone at the last minute, meaning he played seven big tournaments in a span of nine weeks, all of them in stifling heat except for Paris. Winning didn’t really sink in until he returned home to Florida and was given a surprise celebration party at his restaurant. He said it has become “our Jupiter tradition,” celebrating victories for PGA Tour players when they win. “Finally, they get to celebrate one of my wins,” he said. The next one? The first step is figuring out where to play. Woods is eligible for the winners-only start to the year at Kapalua, which is a possibility. He might end up dropping a tournament or two in the spring because of the crowded calendar. Three of the majors are on courses where he has won before — Augusta National, Bethpage Black (PGA Championship) and Pebble Beach (U.S. Open). There will be talk of catching Snead and resuming the chase of Nicklaus, all because of one win that a year ago didn’t seem likely.