Kleiner Perkins

15 Feb 19
Archy Worldys

Georgios Petropoulos Searcher Guntram Wolff Economist The problem of European companies lies in the absence of common innovation, research and education policies, according to researchers at the "World", researchers Georgios Petropoulos and Guntram Wolff. Posted today at 17h31, updated at 17h31 Time to Reading 4 min. Subscribers article Tribune. Big is beautiful This is what […]

15 Feb 19
TechCrunch

Late last month, the venture firm Kleiner Perkins began an official reboot, with a new, $600 million fund, as well as some new faces blazing the trail for the outfit going forward, including Mamoon Hamid and Ilya Fushman, investors who joined Kleiner from Social Capital and Index Ventures, respectively. Their roles at the 47-year-old firm […]

14 Feb 19
VentureBeat
Artificial intelligence (AI) is no longer the stuff of science fiction. Sure, there is still much hyperbole around certain applications of AI (and whether they truly can be called AI), but with smart speakers topping Christmas shopping lists and commercial driverless taxi services now in operation, AI is more science fact than ever. Against that backdrop, a new venture capital (VC) firm officially launched today with $55 million in its coffers for very early-stage startups in the field of AI, machine learning, automation, robotics, and internet of things (IoT). Catapult Ventures is the brainchild of Rouz Jazayeri, a former Intel executive and more recently a partner at Kleiner Perkins; and Darren Liccardo, a former engineering executive at Tesla and drone company DJI. Jazayeri actually helped DJI, one of Kleiner Perkins’ portfolio companies, recruit Liccardo from Tesla, and from this the two began working together on a number of projects. Recently, Liccardo advised Kleiner Perkins on investments around AI, which was the seed for the two to go it alone at Catapult Ventures. Oversubscribed News of the VC firm actually emerged in January 2018, when an SEC filing revealed plans for a new $50 million fund — though not a great deal was known about it. Now that the first fund is officially closed, Catapult has revealed specifics. First up, the fund is made up of money from myriad sources — corporations from across the automotive, aviation, chip, and IoT spheres; institutional investors; and family offices. Moreover, we now know that the fund’s goal is to target seed-stage and pre-seed-stage companies, and serve as the “first institutional, the most helpful, and the most influential investors,” according to a statement issued to VentureBeat. That said, in its short lifespan so far, Catapult has joined the series A rounds in a handful of companies — stealth satellite startup SpinLaunch, which closed a $35 million series A round; a self-service AI platform for developers called Xnor.ai, which raised $12 million; and driverless truck startup Starsky Robotics at its $16.5 million series A round last March. These were outliers though, and were part of Catapult’s early launch phase at the fund’s first closure. Starsky Robotics “All three were companies that we had known about for quite some time before we did our first close,” Jazayeri told VentureBeat. “All three were companies that, had our fund been up and running, we would have been lead investors (or co-lead) in their seed rounds. We still had strong conviction in these teams after our first close, so we made small investments alongside great series A investors. This strategy kick-started our fund with three early investments that helped us tremendously during the second half of our fundraise.” So moving forward, Catapult will be very much focused on pre-series A funding, and so far it has invested in a total of seven startups. Additionally, Jazayeri said that there are separate LP (limited partner) funds under management that can be used for additional follow-on funding if the companies perform well. “We are very fortunate to have found a supportive group of LPs who share the same vision as we do,” he said. “As part of our collaboration, many of these LPs can and will be follow-on investors in the companies we back.” Catapult’s strategy is two-pronged. It’s about getting in as early as it can, and invest in companies that are creating horizontal “core” AI technologies that can be applied to more than one industry. What we’re talking about here is things like sensors, AI algorithms, “next generation compute architectures,” and so on. “It is our mission to first identify innovative companies with large market potential and then guide them successfully through the early stages of their company building,” Jazayeri continued. However, Catapult will also invest in more industry-specific technologies that integrate hardware and software, including industrial manufacturing, agricultural technology, and — as evidenced by Starsky Robotics — autonomous trucking. “We are in an incredibly interesting time where the intersection of technology development across several core hardware and software engineering domains presents an opportunity to leverage systems-thinking in new ways,” added Liccardo. Focus For now, Catapult will be focused entirely on North America, a factor that is influenced largely by its intention to be “hands-on” investors. That is to say, there are inherent challenges to investing in international startups when the investors want to work closely with their portfolio. There are other AI-focused funds out there, of course — just last week, a new Canadian VC fund called Framework Venture Partners launched with $115 million under its belt. In the past year alone, dedicated AI funds have emerged from AI superstar Andrew Ng, Qualcomm, Micron, Base10 Partners, and others. The timing of today’s announcement is notable, though, as it comes in the same week that President Trump signed an executive order to establish the American AI Initiative, which will task federal agencies with devoting more resources to AI training, research, and promotion. “AI is something that touches every aspect of people’s lives,” a White House official said. “What this initiative attempts to do is to bring all those together under one umbrella and show the promise of this technology for the American people.” With all eyes on the AI prize, Catapult Ventures hopes to invest in up to 25 startups from its first fund — startups that are working on genuine applications for their technologies. “We are making targeted investments into founders and technologies that have the best opportunity to create meaningful long-term value with a practical deployment strategy,” Liccardo explained. “We look for founders who create a competitive advantage with interdisciplinary thinking.”
13 Feb 19
ViperPay

2019-02-13 02:26:15 [ad_1] In small-business financing, banks and loan applicants often have different agendas. “Banks are looking for the highest credit quality and larger-dollar loan,” said Greg Ott, the president of Nav, the maker of a financial management app for businesses that announced a new round of venture funding Tuesday. “A small-business owner often has […]

12 Feb 19
Andre Eger

In 2011, Sahil Lavingia left his job as the second employee at Pinterest to build Gumroad, which he dreamed would become a billion-dollar company. He raised about $8 million in his first year. But things didn’t keep growing. At one point he ended up having to lay off 75% of his staff, including his friends, and […]

12 Feb 19
Pallet & Plate

DoorDash is reportedly in the process of raising a $500 million round, reports The Wall Street Journal. The round would value DoorDash at more than $6 billion and possibly up to $7 billion. Temasek Holdings Pte., Singapore’s state investment firm, is expected to lead the round. Last year, DoorDash raised a $250 million round of financing […]

12 Feb 19
E Wealth Training

Mel Feller MPA, MHR, Discusses Planning for First Time Entrepreneurs in Texas
Mel is the President/Founder of Mel Feller Seminars with Coaching for Success 360, Inc. and Mel Feller Coaching. Mel Feller is an Innovator and Business Leader. Mel Feller currently maintains offices in Texas and in Utah. Currently an MBA Candidate.

More and more students, both in undergraduate and graduate institutions, are deciding to launch their own ventures upon graduation rather than taking the traditional route of working for another firm. Likewise, more and more individuals are leaving their jobs to fulfill their entrepreneurial dreams.
Mel Feller, MPA, MHR, is a well-known real estate, business consultant, personal development consultant and speaker, specializing in performance, productivity, and profits. Mel is the President/Founder of Mel Feller Seminars with Coaching For Success 360, Inc. and Mel Feller Coaching, a real estate and business specific coaching company. His three books for real estate professionals are systems on how to become an exceptional sales performer. His four books in Business and Government Grants are ways to leverage and increase your business Success in both time and money! His book on Personal Development “Lies that Will Sabotage Your Success”. Mel Feller is in Texas and In Utah.

12 Feb 19
Mel Feller Entrepreneurial Ideas

Mel Feller MPA, MHR, Discusses Planning for First Time Entrepreneurs
Mel is the President/Founder of Mel Feller Seminars with Coaching for Success 360, Inc. and Mel Feller Coaching. Mel Feller is an Innovator and Business Leader. Mel Feller currently maintains offices in Texas and in Utah. Currently an MBA Candidate.

More and more students, both in undergraduate and graduate institutions, are deciding to launch their own ventures upon graduation rather than taking the traditional route of working for another firm. Likewise, more and more individuals are leaving their jobs to fulfill their entrepreneurial dreams.

Mel Feller MPA, MHR, Discusses Planning for First Time Entrepreneurs
While these ventures may ultimately be very successful (e.g., Google and Microsoft were both launched by students), they face certain challenges in their business plans and capital raising processes. The foremost challenge is overcoming the lack of experience of the management team. A classis chicken-and-egg problem presents itself, when the management team has no past company successes to point to, and cannot prove itself unless given the opportunity to launch the business. While this problem is nearly always the case for graduating students, it also presents itself to many entrepreneurs, particularly those who are launching their first ventures.
To overcome this challenge, these ventures must represent themselves as having a great team by attracting a stellar management team and/or advisors. By attracting a quality management team, even if the team will not start until after financing, it gives investors that confidence that the plan will be properly executed. It also proves that the entrepreneurs have the ability to sell others on their vision. The management team need not be complete before seeking capital, since additional members will most likely be added after capital is raised. For instance, shortly after Google raised capital from Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Omid Kordestani left Netscape to accept a position as vice president of business development and sales, and Urs Halzle was hired away from UC Santa Barbara as vice president of engineering.