La Guns

24 Jan 19

Piece my editor asked me to write for Flaunt.com A year ago I moved from my native little Bordeaux to one of the biggest cities in the world, Los Angeles. Once settled in, it didn’t take long for me to venture on dating apps to see what this city is made of. After carefully avoiding […]

24 Jan 19
Ed B on Sports

Madeline was born March 18, 1996 and raised in Los Angeles, California. She began modeling when she was 3 years old, soon after she was discovered by her Theatrical agent “Wendy” in a nail shop in Sherman Oaks and began her theatrical acting career. She has performed in around 60 principal role/national commercials. you may […]

24 Jan 19
San Gabriel Valley Tribune
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
Daily News
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
Whittier Daily News
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
Daily Breeze
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
SCNG
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
Daily Bulletin
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
Pasadena Star News
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
Press Telegram
A plea deal between a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department deputy and federal prosecutors filed on Jan. 11 reveals that the deputy engaged in a pattern of using his badge to steal drugs and money, including an October robbery where he and at least two others stole 1,226 of pounds of marijuana, $615,000 in cash and $30,000 in money orders from a Los Angeles marijuana distribution warehouse. Marc Antrim, 41, of South El Monte, a patrol deputy who was assigned to the sheriff’s station in Temple City, agreed to plead guilty to six federal charges related to drug trafficking, unlawfully detaining three others during the robbery and depriving them of their constitutional rights, brandishing a gun during the robbery and using his status as a law enforcement officer to carry out the crime. One of the accomplices, Kevin McBride, 43, of Glendora also signed a plea deal, admitting to the armed robbery and drug trafficking crimes. Though federal prosecutors have not yet made sentencing recommendations, the plea agreement said Antrim may serve about 13 years in federal prison. Antrim, McBride, and Eric Rodriguez, 32, of Adelanto, who were arrested in November, had previously faced a possible sentence of 40 years. Rodriguez has not signed a plea deal. A judge’s order has kept the three in jail since Nov. 13. The plea deal revealed a pattern of behavior where Antrim used his badge to commit “criminal conduct.” Antrim confessed to at least four other occasions where he seized cash and drugs during unlawful searches. He never reported these seizures to the Sheriff’s Department, the plea deal said. Antrim agreed to forfeit any money, property, or assets gained from, or used in, his “criminal conduct,” including a 2012 Silver Mercedes sedan. According to the plea agreement, the pattern continued in the early morning of Oct. 29, 2018, when Antrim, who was off-duty; McBride, Rodriguez, and unnamed “co-conspirators” robbed a commercial marijuana warehouse in Los Angeles. Antrim drove to the warehouse with McBride and one other individual, using a Ford Explorer SUV taken from a sheriff’s station. Antrim donned a green vest that said “sheriff,” while McBride and the other person posed as law enforcement officials, wearing green jackets with Sheriff’s Department patches or insignia on the sleeve and chest. Law enforcement duty belts were wrapped around their waists. As related by the plea deal, the three carried guns. Antrim had his on-duty handgun. The group entered the warehouse and showed an employee a fake search warrant. The group then forced the two warehouse security guards and the warehouse employee into the backseat of the sheriff’s SUV. They watched as Antrim and the group carried boxes, garbage bags, and clear bags of marijuana from the warehouse, into a Penske truck. During the operation, Los Angeles Police Department officers arrived at the warehouse. McBride and the other individuals ran away, leaving behind their uniforms, while Antrim stayed behind. He was able to lie his way through the officers’ questions, saying he was working as a part of the Sheriff’s Department’s narcotics unit, conducting a lawful search at the warehouse. Once the LAPD officers left, Rodriguez arrived with another individual in a Dodge Ram truck. The group drove off with the drugs and money, stashing them at McBride’s house in Glendora, and later that day, to a storage space in Walnut. Antrim remains an employee of the department and was removed from duty without pay, said Nicole Nishida, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department. Officials at the department declined to comment on the plea deal since the criminal investigation is ongoing. Antrim’s defense attorney, Edward Robinson, confirmed that his client had agreed to the plea deal earlier this month, but declined to comment further on the case. Defense attorneys for McBride and Rodriguez did not immediately return requests for comment. Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, said federal investigators are continuing their probe of the October robbery. The two plea agreements mention several unnamed “co-conspirators.” When asked whether more individuals would be charged in connection to the incident, Mrozek said it is within the realm of possibility. He expects a sentencing date for Antrim and McBride to be set within the next three months.
24 Jan 19
just words and other things i don't know

In Indianapolis, in the year 1990, Farm Aid held a concert that included John Hiatt, Steve Earle, Bonnie Raitt, LL Cool J (who couldn’t make it), Willie Nelson, Neil Young, a Jesse Jackson sermon on uniting urban and rural interest, a Guns ‘N’ Roses performance at the peak of their drug addled worst (it was […]

24 Jan 19
umaine insurance

umaine insurance umaine insurance BEST ANSWER: Try this site where you can compare quotes: https://tinyurl.com/y9odcq58 RELATED QUESTIONS: Does motorcycle insurance cost the same as car insurance? How long does it take for a speeding ticket to affect my insurance rate? “””How much to insure a 94 ford pickup w/ 120,000 miles for a 16y male?””” […]

24 Jan 19
Daily Crossword Puzzle Solver

Welcome to Crossword Puzzle Answers. Our website is dedicated to Crossword Answers. We solve all the clues from publishers such as New York Times, LA Times, USA Today etc. Since you arrived at this particular page you are looking for the answer to New York Times January 24th 2019 Crossword Clues so without wasting your […]

24 Jan 19
Heavyfonía

Coindidencia, destino, llámenlo como quieran. En 1989 todos los hechos convergieron para que una emergente banda de New Jersey lanzara uno de los mejores discos debut de la historia. Acá contamos de qué está hecho el disco homónimo de Skid Row. Puede que la historia de Skid Row haya empezado en Sayreville, New Jersey,  cuando […]

24 Jan 19

When I came to Bogotá for the first time in 2017, I spent ten days trapped inside a large hotel with mostly Europeans and North Americans. We were fed bland, unseasoned chicken, made to wake up way too early, and taught very little about the reality of living and teaching in Colombia. Between daft courses […]