Leading Article

21 May 19
Update News Portal

*Warning: this article contains some spoilers for the series – but none for the final episode* Image copyright HBO/Sky Atlantic Female characters in Game of Thrones speak about three times less than male characters in the show, according to new data. Although the hugely popular show ended this week after eight seasons, the debate on […]

21 May 19
Joanna Miller

Intricately woven into human culture –  martial arts has become as diverse as any other aspect that makes up our civilization. In this article, we look at two of the most popular forms known today – Tae Kwon Do and MuayThai. History TaeKwonDo was invented in the 1940s by Korean Martial Artists using karate and […]

21 May 19
My Marbles

I have more experience being me than I have being anyone else, contrary to what I lead myself to believe. However, like most people trying to figure shit out in their mid twenties, every day it feels as if I have to speed-read a new chapter of the Being Rosemary manual, a book which has seemingly endless volume. As I progress, I feel the nostalgic ghost of past experiences follow me through each numerical step that details the many systems of my being. Some of my favorite recent chapters include: What, When, and How Much? Food and Your Body; Where Is All This Tension Coming From? Moving Your Body; No, Stressfully Dicking Around on Your Computer Does Not Constitute Real Rest; and my personal favorite, Breathing. But as I skim the chapters on interacting with other people, I stop and wonder, “If I’m only just learning all this about myself, how can I ostensibly expect to express myself responsibly to others?”

21 May 19
O Society

by Rick Sterling Global Research edited by O Society May 21, 2019 An honest and accurate analysis of the 2016 election is not just an academic exercise. It is very relevant to the current election campaign. Yet over the past two years, Russiagate has dominated media and political debate and largely replaced a serious analysis […]

21 May 19
Where Amazing Things Happen

Personal financial planning is an ongoing process, one that consists of three general activities: Controlling your day-to-day finances to enable you to do the things that bring you satisfaction and enjoyment. Choosing and following a course toward long-term financial goals such as buying a house, sending your kids to college, or retiring comfortably. Building a financial safety net to prevent financial disasters caused […]

21 May 19
The Scottish Sun
WOMEN are more likely to die of cardiac arrest because people don’t step in to do CPR, experts say. New research found that nearly three-quarters of us would attempt to resuscitate a collapsed man, compared with 68 per cent if it was a woman, in public. Experts claim women are more likely to die of cardiac arrest because people don’t step in to do CPR The Dutch researchers say that this could be because people didn’t recognise that women were having a cardiac arrest, which can lead to delays in calling emergency services. But women themselves may also be unaware of the symptoms, according to the team from the University of Amsterdam. Cardiologist Dr Hanno Tan, who led the research, said: “People may be less aware that cardiac arrest can occur as often in women as in men, and the women themselves may not recognise the urgency of their symptoms. “Women may have symptoms of an impending heart attack that are less easy to interpret, such as fatigue, fainting, vomiting and neck or jaw pain, whereas men are more likely to report typical complaints such as chest pain.” Another reason might be because demographically, there are more elderly women living on their own than men, therefore there isn’t as many people around to see it happen. Survival rate HALF that of men Dr Tan and his team analysed data from all resuscitation attempts made by emergency services between 2006 to 2012 in one province in The Netherlands. They identified 5,717 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests treated during this period, 28 per cent of which occurred in women. Their findings, published in the European Heart Journal, showed that the overall chances of women surviving to being discharged from hospital was about half that of men – 12.5 per cent compared with 20 per cent. [boxout headline=”What are the symptoms of cardiac arrest?”]Cardiac arrest is when the heart suddnely stops beating. Signs and symptoms suggesting a person has gone into cardiac arrest include: they appear not to be breathing they’re not moving they don’t respond to any stimulation, such as being touched or spoken to If you think somebody has gone into cardiac arrest and you don’t have access to an automated external defibrillator (AED), you should perform chest compressions, as this can help restart the heart. [/boxout] Cardiac arrest vs heart attack Cardiac arrest is an electrical fault with the heart, where it goes into an irregular rhythm and stops beating suddenly. The symptoms are usually immediate and drastic and sufferers will suddenly collapse, appear to stop breathing and won’t respond to any stimulation – such as being touched or spoken to. It differs to a heart attack, which is a blockage in the blood supply to the organ, and is usually accompanied by chest pain, shortness of breath and feeling weak or dizzy. The team believe the disparity is down to the lower rate of shockable initial rhythm in women, which is the heart rhythm recorded when someone with cardiac arrest is connected to an electrocardiogram machine. It is very fast – often more than 300 beats a minute – and chaotic. [quote credit=”Dr Hanno Tan ” credit-meta=”University of Amsterdam”]Given the short window available to save the life of the patient, every minute in this early phase counts.[/quote] This fast and irregular rhythm prevents the heart from beating in a coordinated way so that there is no effective pump function, and blood can no longer circulate round the body and to the heart, leading to cardiac arrest. Death occurs within minutes unless the heart can be shocked back to a normal rhythm by means of an electrical current from a defibrillator. If this does not happen, then the shockable initial rhythm dissolves into a “flat line”, which indicates the absence of any electrical activity from the heart. At this point it is too late for defibrillation to work and the only remaining option is chest compression to try to restore circulation sufficiently for the heart to regain its electrical and mechanical activity. [boxout headline=”How to carry out chest compressions”]To carry out a chest compression on an adult: 1. Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers. 2. Using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5-6cm on their chest. 3. Repeat this until an ambulance arrives. Aim to do the chest compressions at a rate of 100-120 compressions a minute. You can watch a video on CPR for more information about how to perform “hands-only” CPR. Source: NHS [/boxout] The ability to recognise and treat a cardiac arrest within minutes is, therefore, crucial to being able to treat patients while they still have a shockable initial rhythm and before their heart stops. The researchers say that raising awareness and providing those who live on their own with wearable devices could tackle the problem with survival differences. Dr Tan said: “As cardiac arrests occur most often outside the hospital setting in the general population, much can probably be gained by raising awareness in society that cardiac arrest is as common in women as in men but may have different symptoms. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON HEART DISEASE” term_id=”8054″ posts_number=”12″ /] “Given the short window available to save the life of the patient, every minute in this early phase counts.” Meanwhile, doctors have previously warned that more women are also dying of heart attacks because they have different symptoms to men. Dr Glen Pyle from the University of Guelph claims that treatment guidelines for heart attacks are based on data collected primarily from men, and a result, “women are also less likely to receive recommended therapies, interventions and rehabilitation opportunities”. [bc_video video_id=”5819489669001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”How to use a defibrillator – know what to do if someone has a cardiac arrest”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
21 May 19
The Irish Sun
WOMEN are more likely to die of cardiac arrest because people don’t step in to do CPR, experts say. New research found that nearly three-quarters of us would attempt to resuscitate a collapsed man, compared with 68 per cent if it was a woman, in public. Experts claim women are more likely to die of cardiac arrest because people don’t step in to do CPR The Dutch researchers say that this could be because people didn’t recognise that women were having a cardiac arrest, which can lead to delays in calling emergency services. But women themselves may also be unaware of the symptoms, according to the team from the University of Amsterdam. Cardiologist Dr Hanno Tan, who led the research, said: “People may be less aware that cardiac arrest can occur as often in women as in men, and the women themselves may not recognise the urgency of their symptoms. “Women may have symptoms of an impending heart attack that are less easy to interpret, such as fatigue, fainting, vomiting and neck or jaw pain, whereas men are more likely to report typical complaints such as chest pain.” Another reason might be because demographically, there are more elderly women living on their own than men, therefore there isn’t as many people around to see it happen. Survival rate HALF that of men Dr Tan and his team analysed data from all resuscitation attempts made by emergency services between 2006 to 2012 in one province in The Netherlands. They identified 5,717 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests treated during this period, 28 per cent of which occurred in women. Their findings, published in the European Heart Journal, showed that the overall chances of women surviving to being discharged from hospital was about half that of men – 12.5 per cent compared with 20 per cent. [boxout headline=”What are the symptoms of cardiac arrest?”]Cardiac arrest is when the heart suddnely stops beating. Signs and symptoms suggesting a person has gone into cardiac arrest include: they appear not to be breathing they’re not moving they don’t respond to any stimulation, such as being touched or spoken to If you think somebody has gone into cardiac arrest and you don’t have access to an automated external defibrillator (AED), you should perform chest compressions, as this can help restart the heart. [/boxout] Cardiac arrest vs heart attack Cardiac arrest is an electrical fault with the heart, where it goes into an irregular rhythm and stops beating suddenly. The symptoms are usually immediate and drastic and sufferers will suddenly collapse, appear to stop breathing and won’t respond to any stimulation – such as being touched or spoken to. It differs to a heart attack, which is a blockage in the blood supply to the organ, and is usually accompanied by chest pain, shortness of breath and feeling weak or dizzy. The team believe the disparity is down to the lower rate of shockable initial rhythm in women, which is the heart rhythm recorded when someone with cardiac arrest is connected to an electrocardiogram machine. It is very fast – often more than 300 beats a minute – and chaotic. [quote credit=”Dr Hanno Tan ” credit-meta=”University of Amsterdam”]Given the short window available to save the life of the patient, every minute in this early phase counts.[/quote] This fast and irregular rhythm prevents the heart from beating in a coordinated way so that there is no effective pump function, and blood can no longer circulate round the body and to the heart, leading to cardiac arrest. Death occurs within minutes unless the heart can be shocked back to a normal rhythm by means of an electrical current from a defibrillator. If this does not happen, then the shockable initial rhythm dissolves into a “flat line”, which indicates the absence of any electrical activity from the heart. At this point it is too late for defibrillation to work and the only remaining option is chest compression to try to restore circulation sufficiently for the heart to regain its electrical and mechanical activity. [boxout headline=”How to carry out chest compressions”]To carry out a chest compression on an adult: 1. Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers. 2. Using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5-6cm on their chest. 3. Repeat this until an ambulance arrives. Aim to do the chest compressions at a rate of 100-120 compressions a minute. You can watch a video on CPR for more information about how to perform “hands-only” CPR. Source: NHS [/boxout] The ability to recognise and treat a cardiac arrest within minutes is, therefore, crucial to being able to treat patients while they still have a shockable initial rhythm and before their heart stops. The researchers say that raising awareness and providing those who live on their own with wearable devices could tackle the problem with survival differences. Dr Tan said: “As cardiac arrests occur most often outside the hospital setting in the general population, much can probably be gained by raising awareness in society that cardiac arrest is as common in women as in men but may have different symptoms. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON HEART DISEASE” term_id=”8054″ posts_number=”12″ /] “Given the short window available to save the life of the patient, every minute in this early phase counts.” Meanwhile, doctors have previously warned that more women are also dying of heart attacks because they have different symptoms to men. Dr Glen Pyle from the University of Guelph claims that treatment guidelines for heart attacks are based on data collected primarily from men, and a result, “women are also less likely to receive recommended therapies, interventions and rehabilitation opportunities”. [bc_video video_id=”5819489669001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”How to use a defibrillator – know what to do if someone has a cardiac arrest”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
21 May 19
Edmonton Journal

Nurse, Canada shut down USA 3-0 to clinch Group A Round robin action wrapped up on Tuesday in both Kosice and Bratislava with three games in each venue. All four Edmonton Oilers at the tournament played, in four separate games. As usual, all four logged significant ice time for their respective national sides. It was […]

21 May 19
The Sun
WOMEN are more likely to die of cardiac arrest because people don’t step in to do CPR, experts say. New research found that nearly three-quarters of us would attempt to resuscitate a collapsed man, compared with 68 per cent if it was a woman, in public. Experts claim women are more likely to die of cardiac arrest because people don’t step in to do CPR The Dutch researchers say that this could be because people didn’t recognise that women were having a cardiac arrest, which can lead to delays in calling emergency services. But women themselves may also be unaware of the symptoms, according to the team from the University of Amsterdam. Cardiologist Dr Hanno Tan, who led the research, said: “People may be less aware that cardiac arrest can occur as often in women as in men, and the women themselves may not recognise the urgency of their symptoms. “Women may have symptoms of an impending heart attack that are less easy to interpret, such as fatigue, fainting, vomiting and neck or jaw pain, whereas men are more likely to report typical complaints such as chest pain.” Another reason might be because demographically, there are more elderly women living on their own than men, therefore there isn’t as many people around to see it happen. Survival rate HALF that of men Dr Tan and his team analysed data from all resuscitation attempts made by emergency services between 2006 to 2012 in one province in The Netherlands. They identified 5,717 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests treated during this period, 28 per cent of which occurred in women. Their findings, published in the European Heart Journal, showed that the overall chances of women surviving to being discharged from hospital was about half that of men – 12.5 per cent compared with 20 per cent. [boxout headline=”What are the symptoms of cardiac arrest?”]Cardiac arrest is when the heart suddnely stops beating. Signs and symptoms suggesting a person has gone into cardiac arrest include: they appear not to be breathing they’re not moving they don’t respond to any stimulation, such as being touched or spoken to If you think somebody has gone into cardiac arrest and you don’t have access to an automated external defibrillator (AED), you should perform chest compressions, as this can help restart the heart. [/boxout] Cardiac arrest vs heart attack Cardiac arrest is an electrical fault with the heart, where it goes into an irregular rhythm and stops beating suddenly. The symptoms are usually immediate and drastic and sufferers will suddenly collapse, appear to stop breathing and won’t respond to any stimulation – such as being touched or spoken to. It differs to a heart attack, which is a blockage in the blood supply to the organ, and is usually accompanied by chest pain, shortness of breath and feeling weak or dizzy. The team believe the disparity is down to the lower rate of shockable initial rhythm in women, which is the heart rhythm recorded when someone with cardiac arrest is connected to an electrocardiogram machine. It is very fast – often more than 300 beats a minute – and chaotic. [quote credit=”Dr Hanno Tan ” credit-meta=”University of Amsterdam”]Given the short window available to save the life of the patient, every minute in this early phase counts.[/quote] This fast and irregular rhythm prevents the heart from beating in a coordinated way so that there is no effective pump function, and blood can no longer circulate round the body and to the heart, leading to cardiac arrest. Death occurs within minutes unless the heart can be shocked back to a normal rhythm by means of an electrical current from a defibrillator. If this does not happen, then the shockable initial rhythm dissolves into a “flat line”, which indicates the absence of any electrical activity from the heart. At this point it is too late for defibrillation to work and the only remaining option is chest compression to try to restore circulation sufficiently for the heart to regain its electrical and mechanical activity. [boxout headline=”How to carry out chest compressions”]To carry out a chest compression on an adult: 1. Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers. 2. Using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5-6cm on their chest. 3. Repeat this until an ambulance arrives. Aim to do the chest compressions at a rate of 100-120 compressions a minute. You can watch a video on CPR for more information about how to perform “hands-only” CPR. Source: NHS [/boxout] The ability to recognise and treat a cardiac arrest within minutes is, therefore, crucial to being able to treat patients while they still have a shockable initial rhythm and before their heart stops. The researchers say that raising awareness and providing those who live on their own with wearable devices could tackle the problem with survival differences. Dr Tan said: “As cardiac arrests occur most often outside the hospital setting in the general population, much can probably be gained by raising awareness in society that cardiac arrest is as common in women as in men but may have different symptoms. [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON HEART DISEASE” term_id=”8054″ posts_number=”12″ /] “Given the short window available to save the life of the patient, every minute in this early phase counts.” Meanwhile, doctors have previously warned that more women are also dying of heart attacks because they have different symptoms to men. Dr Glen Pyle from the University of Guelph claims that treatment guidelines for heart attacks are based on data collected primarily from men, and a result, “women are also less likely to receive recommended therapies, interventions and rehabilitation opportunities”. [bc_video video_id=”5819489669001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”How to use a defibrillator – know what to do if someone has a cardiac arrest”] We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368 . You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.
21 May 19
fullSTEAMahead365

The reported negative effects of blue light on the skin is a new concern growing out of our increased dependence on screens: computers, cell phones and televisions among them. The beauty industry is taking notice.

21 May 19
LF

Plastic pollution is defined as the accumulation of the different types of plastic material on land, as well as in water bodies like rivers, oceans, canals, lakes. As a commodity, it is used on a large scale all around the world. Basically, it is a synthetic polymer that consists of many organic and inorganic compounds, […]

21 May 19
Sports News

Last Season Record: 6-9-1 2019 Schedule: 1. @ Chicago Bears (8:20) *Thu 2. vs. Minnesota Vikings (1:00) 3. vs. Denver Broncos (1:00) 4. vs. Philadelphia Eagles (8:20) *Thu 5. @ Dallas Cowboys (4:25) 6. vs. Detroit Lions (8:15) *Mon 7. vs. Oakland Raiders (1:00) 8. @ Kansas City Chiefs (8:20) 9. @ Los Angeles Chargers […]

21 May 19
The Sun
“GIVING up is something a Lauda doesn’t do.” So said the irrepressible Niki Lauda, who has died at the age of 70 after an extraordinary life in the fast lane. Niki Lauda: 1949 – 2019 It couldn’t be a more apt phrase to sum up the Formula One champ. The Austrian will always be known for the most courageous comeback in the history of sport. He was on the starting line 40 days after being given the last rites following a fireball crash at the 1976 German Grand Prix at the Nurburgring. He had been trapped inside the burning wreckage of his car for more than a minute. Part of his ear was burnt off along with his eyelids and eyebrows. Toxic gas damaged his lungs and he slipped into a coma. ‘TO HELL AND BACK’ Niki Lauda’s Ferrari bursts into flames on August 1, 1976 at the German Grand Prix held at the Nurburgring after a crash The F1 hero’s Ferrari is reduced to scrap metal left after the fire that nearly cost Niki Lauda his life It was a miracle he survived at all, yet he was racing again in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza a few weeks later. It was years down the line that he admitted that his nerves were shredded but he refused to let anyone see. Lauda wrote in his autobiography, To Hell And Back: “I said then and later that I had conquered my fear quickly and cleanly. “That was a lie. But it would have been foolish to play into the hands of my rivals by confirming my weakness. At Monza, I was rigid with fear.” Lauda returned to the race for the F1 title mere weeks after his horrific accident The three-times World Champion photographed in 1976 before his track accident Lauda raced with bandages round his head. During the race his wounds reopened and his fireproof balaclava was soaked in blood. It had stuck to the dressings and Lauda had to rip it free after crossing the line in fourth. Astonishingly, the heroic driver would go on to win another two world titles to add to the first he won with Ferrari in 1975. THE RIVALRY THAT PUT F1 ON THE MAP As well as his remarkable return, Lauda was known for his great rivalry with the British McLaren driver James Hunt, a story told in 2013 movie Rush, directed by Ron Howard. Niki Lauda and James Hunt were race rivals but also lifelong friends Following Lauda’s crash, Hunt took the championship by a single point. But Lauda would not be defeated — he made sure he got the title back the following year. The drama of that F1 season is considered by many to have launched the sport’s global popularity. Its twists and turns had something for everybody, with the clinical, brusque Austrian coming back against the odds to continue his duel with the handsome English playboy. ‘WE’D GO OUT DRINKING AND TRY TO FIND THE GIRLS’ Away from the track, they were friends who never missed a chance to take the mickey out of each other. In Japan, on race morning, when Hunt was in bed with a girlfriend, Lauda goosestepped into his room and declared: “Today, I vin the Vorld Championship.” Niki Lauda and James Hunt at the Belgian Grand Prix , Belgium, May 21, 1978 ‘In the old days, to drive 300km an hour side by side towards a corner, if someone makes a mistake, one or both are killed’, said Lauda, explaining his respect for James Hunt Lauda had great respect for Hunt, who died of a heart attack in 1993 aged 45. He said: “We respected each other, because in the old days, to drive 300km an hour side by side towards a corner, if someone makes a mistake, one or both are killed. Hunt was someone you could rely on to be really precise.” Together, the pair enjoyed all the perks of F1 fame, from the parties to the women. Lauda once said: “I had a couple of nights out with James . . . or a lot of them. The only difference was I did it mostly on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, after the race, and he did it on Friday and Saturday, before the race. Niki Lauda with first wife Marlene Knaus The ace recovering with the help of his wife and son after the horrifying F1 fire “We’d go out drinking then try to find where the girls were. James was outstanding, let me tell you.” In London, Lauda would often stay at Hunt’s flat after a night out. “But not together,” he joked. “There were four of us.” After Hunt retired and found himself in difficulty, it was Lauda who stepped in to help. Lauda said: “I met him a couple of times in London and he was completely broke because he had invested his money wrong. I told him, ‘You can’t go on like this’. I lent him some money and told him to stop drinking and get going.” HERO’S SENSE OF HUMOUR The F1 hero called his baseball cap a ‘protection for stupid people looking at me stupidly’ After the accident, Lauda, who possessed a wicked sense of humour, would wear a baseball cap to conceal some of the scars, which he called his “protection for stupid people looking at me stupidly”. He also said: “I have an accident as an excuse to look ugly. Some people don’t have this excuse.” Lauda used to give his trophies away to his local garage because they were “useless”. He added: “I said, ‘If you give me a free car wash for the rest of my life, you can have all of them’, and that is what I did.” LAUDA’S ICY DETERMINATION Lauda’s route to F1 was one that required determination. He came from a grand Viennese family in the paper-manufacturing business who did not approve of his obsession with cars. Niki Lauda came from a grand Viennese family who did not approve of his obsession with cars As a teenager he worked as an apprentice mechanic, spending his wages on cars. In 1968, without telling his parents, Lauda won his first race with a Mini he had bought with his grandmother’s help. By the time he had risen through the ranks to Formula Three, he was heavily in debt. His F1 debut came at the 1971 Austrian GP driving for March, but the team were uncompetitive. Lauda borrowed more money and bought a seat at BRM in 1973, alongside Clay Regazzoni. He so impressed the Swiss driver with his speed and meticulous level of detail that when Regazzoni joined Ferrari, Lauda was also signed. Lauda rose through the ranks to Formula Three and so impressed F1 driver Clay Regazzoni, he signed on to Ferrari with him He retired in 1979 to concentrate on his airline businesses including Lauda Air. But in 1982 he was tempted back by McLaren boss Ron Dennis and a £2.3million salary, the largest fee then seen in the sport. Lauda proved his worth, clinching a third title in 1984 by half a point. A year later, aged 36, he retired from racing for good. RACING CHAMP’S FAST-PACED PERSONAL LIFE His personal life was as fast-paced as his career, with two wives and five children by three women, one the result of an affair while Lauda was married to his first wife, Marlene Knaus. In 2004 he started dating air hostess Birgit Wetzinger, who was 30 years his junior. They had only been together for eight months when Lauda needed a kidney transplant, and, in an extraordinary act of love, Birgit donated one of hers. He had already had one kidney transplant in 1997, with an organ from his brother. In 2004 Niki Lauda started dating air hostess Birgit Wetzinger, who was 30 years his junior Just eight months into their romance, when Lauda needed a kidney transplant, Birgit donated one of hers Lauda and Birgit married in 2008 and a year later she gave birth to their twins, Max and Mia. ONE OF FEW WHO STOOD UP TO BERNIE ECCLESTONE In recent years, Lauda held temporary roles as a consultant at the Ferrari F1 team and in 2001 took charge of Jaguar for a short spell. In September 2012, Lauda became a non-executive director of the Mercedes F1 team, convincing Britain’s Lewis Hamilton to jump ship from McLaren to replace Michael Schumacher. Mercedes also needed the three-time world champ Lauda’s sheer bloody-mindedness in countless meetings with former F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone. There were few people in F1 who would stand up to Ecclestone when it came to racing politics — but Lauda was one of them. Lauda was one of the few people to stand up to Bernie Ecclestone when it came to racing politics Mercedes has gone on to dominate the sport, winning both the drivers’ and constructors’ titles for the past five years and it is currently leading for a sixth. Lauda’s contribution to Mercedes’ success should not be underestimated. He caused them a few PR problems with his straight-talking, calling out Hamilton and former team-mate Nico Rosberg whenever he felt the need, yet it was refreshingly honest. Lauda said there would be “no bulls**t”, a phrase he would frequently drop into an interview, whether or not live on TV. Michael Schumacher and Niki Lauda pictured together at the Grand Prix in Monaco in 1996 LEGEND’S LAST DAYS In July 2018, Lauda was diagnosed with a severe infection that needed a double lung transplant. While the op was a success, in January he caught pneumonia while on holiday in Ibiza and was taken back into hospital in Vienna. Just last week, at the Spanish Grand Prix, team members were hopeful of his return before the end of the season. [article-rail-section title=”most read in sport” posts_category=”321″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] But he died in his sleep on Monday night at the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland, plunging the sport into darkness ahead of this weekend’s Monaco Grand Prix. Lauda was much, much more than a former F1 world champion. He was the personification of heroism. [bc_video video_id=”6039122260001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Niki Lauda shares some moments of befriending and competing against former Formula 1 rival, James Hunt”]
21 May 19
The Scottish Sun
“GIVING up is something a Lauda doesn’t do.” So said the irrepressible Niki Lauda, who has died at the age of 70 after an extraordinary life in the fast lane. Niki Lauda: 1949 – 2019 It couldn’t be a more apt phrase to sum up the Formula One champ. The Austrian will always be known for the most courageous comeback in the history of sport. He was on the starting line 40 days after being given the last rites following a fireball crash at the 1976 German Grand Prix at the Nurburgring. He had been trapped inside the burning wreckage of his car for more than a minute. Part of his ear was burnt off along with his eyelids and eyebrows. Toxic gas damaged his lungs and he slipped into a coma. ‘TO HELL AND BACK’ Niki Lauda’s Ferrari bursts into flames on August 1, 1976 at the German Grand Prix held at the Nurburgring after a crash The F1 hero’s Ferrari is reduced to scrap metal left after the fire that nearly cost Niki Lauda his life It was a miracle he survived at all, yet he was racing again in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza a few weeks later. It was years down the line that he admitted that his nerves were shredded but he refused to let anyone see. Lauda wrote in his autobiography, To Hell And Back: “I said then and later that I had conquered my fear quickly and cleanly. “That was a lie. But it would have been foolish to play into the hands of my rivals by confirming my weakness. At Monza, I was rigid with fear.” Lauda returned to the race for the F1 title mere weeks after his horrific accident The three-times World Champion photographed in 1976 before his track accident Lauda raced with bandages round his head. During the race his wounds reopened and his fireproof balaclava was soaked in blood. It had stuck to the dressings and Lauda had to rip it free after crossing the line in fourth. Astonishingly, the heroic driver would go on to win another two world titles to add to the first he won with Ferrari in 1975. THE RIVALRY THAT PUT F1 ON THE MAP As well as his remarkable return, Lauda was known for his great rivalry with the British McLaren driver James Hunt, a story told in 2013 movie Rush, directed by Ron Howard. Niki Lauda and James Hunt were race rivals but also lifelong friends Following Lauda’s crash, Hunt took the championship by a single point. But Lauda would not be defeated — he made sure he got the title back the following year. The drama of that F1 season is considered by many to have launched the sport’s global popularity. Its twists and turns had something for everybody, with the clinical, brusque Austrian coming back against the odds to continue his duel with the handsome English playboy. ‘WE’D GO OUT DRINKING AND TRY TO FIND THE GIRLS’ Away from the track, they were friends who never missed a chance to take the mickey out of each other. In Japan, on race morning, when Hunt was in bed with a girlfriend, Lauda goosestepped into his room and declared: “Today, I vin the Vorld Championship.” Niki Lauda and James Hunt at the Belgian Grand Prix , Belgium, May 21, 1978 ‘In the old days, to drive 300km an hour side by side towards a corner, if someone makes a mistake, one or both are killed’, said Lauda, explaining his respect for James Hunt Lauda had great respect for Hunt, who died of a heart attack in 1993 aged 45. He said: “We respected each other, because in the old days, to drive 300km an hour side by side towards a corner, if someone makes a mistake, one or both are killed. Hunt was someone you could rely on to be really precise.” Together, the pair enjoyed all the perks of F1 fame, from the parties to the women. Lauda once said: “I had a couple of nights out with James . . . or a lot of them. The only difference was I did it mostly on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, after the race, and he did it on Friday and Saturday, before the race. Niki Lauda with first wife Marlene Knaus The ace recovering with the help of his wife and son after the horrifying F1 fire “We’d go out drinking then try to find where the girls were. James was outstanding, let me tell you.” In London, Lauda would often stay at Hunt’s flat after a night out. “But not together,” he joked. “There were four of us.” After Hunt retired and found himself in difficulty, it was Lauda who stepped in to help. Lauda said: “I met him a couple of times in London and he was completely broke because he had invested his money wrong. I told him, ‘You can’t go on like this’. I lent him some money and told him to stop drinking and get going.” HERO’S SENSE OF HUMOUR The F1 hero called his baseball cap a ‘protection for stupid people looking at me stupidly’ After the accident, Lauda, who possessed a wicked sense of humour, would wear a baseball cap to conceal some of the scars, which he called his “protection for stupid people looking at me stupidly”. He also said: “I have an accident as an excuse to look ugly. Some people don’t have this excuse.” Lauda used to give his trophies away to his local garage because they were “useless”. He added: “I said, ‘If you give me a free car wash for the rest of my life, you can have all of them’, and that is what I did.” LAUDA’S ICY DETERMINATION Lauda’s route to F1 was one that required determination. He came from a grand Viennese family in the paper-manufacturing business who did not approve of his obsession with cars. Niki Lauda came from a grand Viennese family who did not approve of his obsession with cars As a teenager he worked as an apprentice mechanic, spending his wages on cars. In 1968, without telling his parents, Lauda won his first race with a Mini he had bought with his grandmother’s help. By the time he had risen through the ranks to Formula Three, he was heavily in debt. His F1 debut came at the 1971 Austrian GP driving for March, but the team were uncompetitive. Lauda borrowed more money and bought a seat at BRM in 1973, alongside Clay Regazzoni. He so impressed the Swiss driver with his speed and meticulous level of detail that when Regazzoni joined Ferrari, Lauda was also signed. Lauda rose through the ranks to Formula Three and so impressed F1 driver Clay Regazzoni, he signed on to Ferrari with him He retired in 1979 to concentrate on his airline businesses including Lauda Air. But in 1982 he was tempted back by McLaren boss Ron Dennis and a £2.3million salary, the largest fee then seen in the sport. Lauda proved his worth, clinching a third title in 1984 by half a point. A year later, aged 36, he retired from racing for good. RACING CHAMP’S FAST-PACED PERSONAL LIFE His personal life was as fast-paced as his career, with two wives and five children by three women, one the result of an affair while Lauda was married to his first wife, Marlene Knaus. In 2004 he started dating air hostess Birgit Wetzinger, who was 30 years his junior. They had only been together for eight months when Lauda needed a kidney transplant, and, in an extraordinary act of love, Birgit donated one of hers. He had already had one kidney transplant in 1997, with an organ from his brother. In 2004 Niki Lauda started dating air hostess Birgit Wetzinger, who was 30 years his junior Just eight months into their romance, when Lauda needed a kidney transplant, Birgit donated one of hers Lauda and Birgit married in 2008 and a year later she gave birth to their twins, Max and Mia. ONE OF FEW WHO STOOD UP TO BERNIE ECCLESTONE In recent years, Lauda held temporary roles as a consultant at the Ferrari F1 team and in 2001 took charge of Jaguar for a short spell. In September 2012, Lauda became a non-executive director of the Mercedes F1 team, convincing Britain’s Lewis Hamilton to jump ship from McLaren to replace Michael Schumacher. Mercedes also needed the three-time world champ Lauda’s sheer bloody-mindedness in countless meetings with former F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone. There were few people in F1 who would stand up to Ecclestone when it came to racing politics — but Lauda was one of them. Lauda was one of the few people to stand up to Bernie Ecclestone when it came to racing politics Mercedes has gone on to dominate the sport, winning both the drivers’ and constructors’ titles for the past five years and it is currently leading for a sixth. Lauda’s contribution to Mercedes’ success should not be underestimated. He caused them a few PR problems with his straight-talking, calling out Hamilton and former team-mate Nico Rosberg whenever he felt the need, yet it was refreshingly honest. Lauda said there would be “no bulls**t”, a phrase he would frequently drop into an interview, whether or not live on TV. Michael Schumacher and Niki Lauda pictured together at the Grand Prix in Monaco in 1996 LEGEND’S LAST DAYS In July 2018, Lauda was diagnosed with a severe infection that needed a double lung transplant. While the op was a success, in January he caught pneumonia while on holiday in Ibiza and was taken back into hospital in Vienna. Just last week, at the Spanish Grand Prix, team members were hopeful of his return before the end of the season. [article-rail-section title=”most read in sport” posts_category=”4″ posts_number=”6″ query_type=”popular” /] But he died in his sleep on Monday night at the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland, plunging the sport into darkness ahead of this weekend’s Monaco Grand Prix. Lauda was much, much more than a former F1 world champion. He was the personification of heroism. [bc_video video_id=”6039122260001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” caption=”Niki Lauda shares some moments of befriending and competing against former Formula 1 rival, James Hunt”]