Lilash

11 Dec 18
Der Long Lashes Wimpernserum Erfahrungsbericht 6990

Dies müssen Sie jeden Tag wiederholen. Nach zwei bis drei Wochen, wenn die Wimpern sich langsam lösen bin ich leider IMMER zu faul oder zu beschäftigt sie wieder im Salon entfernen zu lassen und warte einfach, bis sie auf natürlich Weise runterkommen, oder sich der Kleber löst. Wenn wir natürlich ein richtiges Produkt wählen… NANOLASH […]

11 Dec 18
DANNIELLEGRACE

Before I start on this passionate list (lol srsly I luv skincare♥) its no secret that I’ve had a mare with my skin this year so I’ve become even more conscious about what I put on it. I have combination/oily skin that usually treats me quite well only with the odd break out here and […]

22 Nov 18
slimseller

More than half of the world’s population has reported to be suffering from black heads. Black heads are specially a major cause for concern in young women, who try their best to look as good as they can. However black heads are not really a vary serious condition but they are an indication of bad […]

20 Nov 18
slimseller

These days, there is hope for the women who have eyelash hypotrichosis or insufficient eyelashes. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have recently approved a product known as Careprost to treat this problem. When it comes to eyelash growth , careprost buy online usa is always the best choice to growth effectively. Here we […]

17 Nov 18
slimseller

Men will lose hair in a variety of ways with the most common hair loss pattern being a receding hairline around their temples; or it could be more centralized hair loss on the top or even at the back of their heads. What most people fail to realize is that this is closely related to […]

14 Nov 18
GirlinTheTown

Lucky are those who are blessed naturally with long and thick eyelashes. We women try every trick in the book to get them long, full, and beautiful. Using lash lengthening and volumizing mascaras is one easy trick, but most of the times, we end up damaging the few lash hair that we have. This post […]

04 Sep 18
slimseller

Latisse is a prescription eyelash treatment that is applied daily to the eye lid at the base of the eyelashes. This eyelash product includes bimatoprost, which has been used to treat elevated intraocular pressure (elevated pressure inside the eye). The FDA posted an alert on 11/19/2007 which stated that use of the prescription drug bimatoprost […]

24 Aug 18
Woolashes

Everyone wants to have luscious lashes that bring out the natural beauty of their eyes and face. But if you weren’t gifted with naturally-long or full lashes, it’s perfectly okay to supplement your own eyelashes! We love beautifying our lashes too! However, sometimes mascara just won’t cut it, no matter how volumizing it is. And […]

13 Aug 18
FLUKE

It has been almost a year since I last tried an eyelash growth serum and having previously reviewed one from Plume Science I was keen to continue my experimentation with growing my lashes. Local beauty destination Cult Cosmetica offered for me to try the LashFood Phyto-Medic Eyelash Enhancer so I thought it was the perfect opportunity to test this […]

10 Aug 18
Waist Training Center

  Image: http://www.spacenk.com  For the last few years I have been using Lilash lash growth treatment (which is excellent if you’re looking for a great lash treatment) but I have gotten lazy with my application and haven’t applied for a good 3 months now. My lashes have actually kept a lot of the strength and […]

03 Aug 18
Vogenix Self Tanner

[ad_1] KIM Ballesty was recovering from cancer treatment last year when she heard about a serum that could help her eyelashes regrow quickly. “I just finished a round of chemo and radiation and I was given LiLash (a popular eyelash growth serum) as a gift to try and help everything regrow,” Ms Ballesty, from Sydney, […]

03 Aug 18
Vogenix Self Tanner

[ad_1] KIM Ballesty was recovering from cancer treatment last year when she heard about a serum that could help her eyelashes regrow quickly. “I just finished a round of chemo and radiation and I was given LiLash (a popular eyelash growth serum) as a gift to try and help everything regrow,” Ms Ballesty, from Sydney, […]

03 Aug 18
The Irish Sun
AN eyelash serum that promises longer, thicker lashes has been banned in Australia over fears it may cause infection. The Department of Health down under has banned the sale of LiLash products in salons and spas as some of the ingredients in the serum require a prescription under Australian law. The LiLash brand claims it is safe to use and promises longer, thicker lashes Multiple women have also reported suffering with red, puffy and weepy eyes after using the product. LiLash, which is available in the UK online and in salons, claims it takes three months of consistent daily use to see results. It is supposed to be applied once a day to the eyelids, along the upper lash line, and one 2ml tube or “three month supply” costs £61. The serum contains a growth hormone called prostagladin, which is commonly used to treat the eye condition glaucoma, but requires a prescription in Australia. The product is available in the UK online and in salons It works by lowering the eye pressure to relieve the pressure glaucoma puts on the optic nerve, but when used in a beauty product it can cause irritation. Kim Ballesty was recovering from cancer treatment last year when she heard about a serum that could help her eyelashes regrow quickly. “I just finished a round of chemo and radiation and I was given LiLash as a gift to try and help everything regrow,” Ms Ballesty, from Sydney, told news.com.au. “You try to do anything to make yourself feel back to normal and prettier again.” A three-month supply of the eyelash serum cost £61 Ms Ballesty stopped using LiLash after the recommended three month period because her eyes became red and irritated. “I looked like I conjunctivitis. I had big dark circles under my eyes. It looked like I had been crying,” she said. “My husband would come home and say ‘What’s wrong, have you been crying?’ I had big red puffy eyes that were often stuck together in the morning if I used the serum the night before.” Four days after Ms Ballesty stopped using LiLash, her eyes returned to normal. “It all cleared up and I never touched it again,” she added. Online reviews are mixed. The internet is littered with horror stories about irritated, red eye infections contracted after using LiLash. The serum is supposed to be applied once a day for three months But for every negative comment there is a ringing endorsement from a woman thrilled with her new long, thick lashes.In May the Australian Department of Health banned the product from being sold in salons. Australian Society of Ophthalmologists president Dr Peter Sumich said the growth hormone in eyelash serums was commonly found in many prescription eye products. “Prostaglandin is the growth hormone used to treat glaucoma. It lowers the eye pressure,” Dr Sumich said. “I have patients who have been put on prostaglandin and their lashes start to grow just from using the eye drops. “It definitely causes the lashes to grow longer, thicker, darker and curl upwards. The product has been banned in Australia because it contains prostigladin, a growth hormone commonly prescribed in eye drops to treat glaucoma “I’ve seen patients with long curly lashes start to curl back on themselves. They end up having to trim them because they get so long. “One of my patients was a beautician and she said ‘I want the drops that make your eyelashes grow’, because one of her clients at her salon had glaucoma and all of a sudden she had incredibly long lashes.” While prostaglandin is definitely an effective ingredient, Dr Sumich said it should only be prescribed by a medical professional. “I wouldn’t advise (people use eyelash serums). I understand why they do it, but we have strict regulations in this country and with good reason,” he said. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia said products containing prostaglandin should only be obtained with a prescription. In May the Australian Department of Health banned the product from being sold in salons. The product is marketed as an alternative to more expensive false eyelash treatments An email sent to the “LiLash Pro Community” and obtained by news.com.au informed those that stocked the product that some of the ingredients in LiLash require a prescription. “While there is nothing harmful in our products, Australia’s categorisation of some of our ingredients requires a prescription. Please remove all LiLash and LiBrow (eyebrow growth serum) from your shelves,” the email from LiLash head office read. “The Health Department in Western Australia has visited a few accounts and has removed product from some salons. Rest assured, I have not provided them a list of accounts or any information regarding who is stocking our products. “At this time, I don’t know how they determine who they contact and when. Other territories will follow eventually, so I am notifying all Australian accounts.” [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON COSMETIC SURGERY” term_id=”507″ posts_number=”12″ /] LiLash chief executive Scott Wasserman said his company “did not realise” that prostaglandin was a prescription-only ingredient in Australia. In the US, where Mr Wasserman and LiLash are based, there are no restrictions on prostaglandin. “For all the years we have been selling in Australia we have not had any complaints,” he said. “Our product in its present form has been on the market for 11 years and we’ve not had any reports of untowards effects. These are very safe ingredients. “When you put anything around the eyes you’re going to be prone to a greater degree of sensitivity or irritation.” This story originally appeared on news.com.au and has been republished with permission. We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours  
03 Aug 18
The Scottish Sun
AN eyelash serum that promises longer, thicker lashes has been banned in Australia over fears it may cause infection. The Department of Health down under has banned the sale of LiLash products in salons and spas as some of the ingredients in the serum require a prescription under Australian law. The LiLash brand claims it is safe to use and promises longer, thicker lashes Multiple women have also reported suffering with red, puffy and weepy eyes after using the product. LiLash, which is available in the UK online and in salons, claims it takes three months of consistent daily use to see results. It is supposed to be applied once a day to the eyelids, along the upper lash line, and one 2ml tube or “three month supply” costs £61. The serum contains a growth hormone called prostagladin, which is commonly used to treat the eye condition glaucoma, but requires a prescription in Australia. The product is available in the UK online and in salons It works by lowering the eye pressure to relieve the pressure glaucoma puts on the optic nerve, but when used in a beauty product it can cause irritation. Kim Ballesty was recovering from cancer treatment last year when she heard about a serum that could help her eyelashes regrow quickly. “I just finished a round of chemo and radiation and I was given LiLash as a gift to try and help everything regrow,” Ms Ballesty, from Sydney, told news.com.au. “You try to do anything to make yourself feel back to normal and prettier again.” A three-month supply of the eyelash serum cost £61 Ms Ballesty stopped using LiLash after the recommended three month period because her eyes became red and irritated. “I looked like I conjunctivitis. I had big dark circles under my eyes. It looked like I had been crying,” she said. “My husband would come home and say ‘What’s wrong, have you been crying?’ I had big red puffy eyes that were often stuck together in the morning if I used the serum the night before.” Four days after Ms Ballesty stopped using LiLash, her eyes returned to normal. “It all cleared up and I never touched it again,” she added. Online reviews are mixed. The internet is littered with horror stories about irritated, red eye infections contracted after using LiLash. The serum is supposed to be applied once a day for three months But for every negative comment there is a ringing endorsement from a woman thrilled with her new long, thick lashes.In May the Australian Department of Health banned the product from being sold in salons. Australian Society of Ophthalmologists president Dr Peter Sumich said the growth hormone in eyelash serums was commonly found in many prescription eye products. “Prostaglandin is the growth hormone used to treat glaucoma. It lowers the eye pressure,” Dr Sumich said. “I have patients who have been put on prostaglandin and their lashes start to grow just from using the eye drops. “It definitely causes the lashes to grow longer, thicker, darker and curl upwards. The product has been banned in Australia because it contains prostigladin, a growth hormone commonly prescribed in eye drops to treat glaucoma “I’ve seen patients with long curly lashes start to curl back on themselves. They end up having to trim them because they get so long. “One of my patients was a beautician and she said ‘I want the drops that make your eyelashes grow’, because one of her clients at her salon had glaucoma and all of a sudden she had incredibly long lashes.” While prostaglandin is definitely an effective ingredient, Dr Sumich said it should only be prescribed by a medical professional. “I wouldn’t advise (people use eyelash serums). I understand why they do it, but we have strict regulations in this country and with good reason,” he said. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia said products containing prostaglandin should only be obtained with a prescription. In May the Australian Department of Health banned the product from being sold in salons. The product is marketed as an alternative to more expensive false eyelash treatments An email sent to the “LiLash Pro Community” and obtained by news.com.au informed those that stocked the product that some of the ingredients in LiLash require a prescription. “While there is nothing harmful in our products, Australia’s categorisation of some of our ingredients requires a prescription. Please remove all LiLash and LiBrow (eyebrow growth serum) from your shelves,” the email from LiLash head office read. “The Health Department in Western Australia has visited a few accounts and has removed product from some salons. Rest assured, I have not provided them a list of accounts or any information regarding who is stocking our products. “At this time, I don’t know how they determine who they contact and when. Other territories will follow eventually, so I am notifying all Australian accounts.” [article-rail-topic title=”MORE ON COSMETIC SURGERY” term_id=”507″ posts_number=”12″ /] LiLash chief executive Scott Wasserman said his company “did not realise” that prostaglandin was a prescription-only ingredient in Australia. In the US, where Mr Wasserman and LiLash are based, there are no restrictions on prostaglandin. “For all the years we have been selling in Australia we have not had any complaints,” he said. “Our product in its present form has been on the market for 11 years and we’ve not had any reports of untowards effects. These are very safe ingredients. “When you put anything around the eyes you’re going to be prone to a greater degree of sensitivity or irritation.” This story originally appeared on news.com.au and has been republished with permission. We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.co.uk or call 0207 782 4368. You can WhatsApp us on 07810 791 502. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours